Posts Tagged ‘Adirondack Land Trust’

Tuesday, February 22, 2022

Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation, Adirondack Land Trust, Eagle Island, Inc. welcome new hires

Three Adirondack-area nonprofit organizations including The Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation, Adirondack Land Trust, and Eagle Island, Inc. welcomed new staff members during the month of February.

The Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation expands their team:

 

The Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation is pleased to welcome two new members to its staff – Susan Harry as its Philanthropy Director, and Jay Locke as its Finance and Operations Director. Since becoming a nonprofit organization in 2017, the Adirondack Loon Center has experienced steady growth and expanded its loon conservation and educational programs across the Park.

“We are very excited to have Susan and Jay join our team, as they greatly increase our capacity to do more for Adirondack loons,” said Dr. Nina Schoch, Executive Director of the Center. “They bring a wide depth of experience and knowledge that will significantly enhance our loon research and conservation projects in the Adirondacks.”

Susan has worked professionally and as a volunteer for many wildlife conservation organizations. She is passionate about protecting the environment for future generations to enjoy. Susan raised awareness and support for the Kenyan Lewa Wildlife Conservancy’s conservation efforts to protect the African Black Rhino, which led to Susan receiving the 2010 Anna Merz Honorary Award.

Her wide experience in fundraising and grant management will greatly expand the Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation’s capacity for sustaining its Adirondack loon conservation and research programs. When Susan is not with loons on the water, she enjoys exploring the Adirondacks by hiking with her golden retrievers, cross-country skiing, and snow-shoeing.

Jay brings a broad background in data management, grant administration, and fundraising to the Loon Center. He previously worked with the Open Society Foundations in NYC, where he provided funding and technical advice on impact evaluation and data management to not-for-profit organizations across the world. Prior to OSF, he supported data analysis projects for the United Nations Development Program in Eswatini, served in the Peace Corps in Kenya as a community economic development advisor, and worked in internal audit for a Fortune 500 company in Atlanta. Jay is a licensed CPA and wildlife rehabilitator, and enjoys birdwatching, identifying lichens, and playing guitar.

Jay and Susan are excited to apply their professional expertise and passion for wildlife conservation in their new roles at the Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation. The Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation is a 501(c)3 non-profit that conducts scientific research and engaging educational programming to promote and inspire passion for the conservation of Common Loons in and beyond New York’s Adirondack Park. To learn more about the Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation visit www.adkloon.org or www.facebook.com/adkloon, or contact the Center at [email protected] or (518) 354-8636. 

 

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Monday, November 22, 2021

No farmland, no food

Holly Rippon-Butler photo by Meqo Sam Cecil
Holly Rippon-Butler is Land Campaign Director for the National Young Farmers Coalition, owner of Farmers Cone Creamery, and an Adirondack Land Trust board member. Following are her remarks from the Adirondack Land Trust’s 2021 annual meeting on the relationship between farmland and the unique Adirondack food system.

I grew up on my family’s dairy farm in Schuylerville, NY, just outside of the Adirondack Park. My first experiences with the Adirondacks were hiking in the mountains and exploring lakes and streams. It wasn’t until I was older and living in the Champlain Valley that I began to appreciate the rich agricultural landscape that is woven into the fabric of the Park as well.

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Kid next to water
Sunday, October 31, 2021

New staff added to Adirondack nonprofits

now hiringHere’s a round up of recent new hires at nonprofits around the Adirondack region:

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Tuesday, October 19, 2021

Ray Curran and Dan Spada Named Adirondack Land Trust Volunteers of the Year

Dan Spada (left) and Ray Curran explore a first-growth Adirondack forest. Photograph provided by Adirondack Land Trust

KEENE, NY — The Adirondack Land Trust recognized two scientists as 2021 Volunteers of the Year for their work to engage people in conservation through natural history.

Friends Ray Curran, of Saranac Lake, and Dan Spada, of Tupper Lake, (pictured here) are volunteers together in many endeavors, including the Northern Forest Atlas, Adirondack Botanical Society, Adirondack Orchid Survey, New York Flora Association, Northern Current music festival, and the Adirondack Land Trust.

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Monday, September 6, 2021

250 acres added to Forest Preserve on Moxham Mountain

moxham

Acquisition Increases Public Access and Recreational Opportunities
The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Adirondack Land Trust today announced the addition of 250 acres to the Forest Preserve on Moxham Mountain between Minerva, Essex County and North Creek, Warren County. The acquisition will increase public access to the south side of Moxham Mountain for hiking and rock climbing.

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Wednesday, February 24, 2021

Private land owners to speak on importance of conservation

The Adirondack Park is known for its Forever Wild Forest Preserve, but a good majority of conservation efforts are done by private landowners themselves.

At 10 a.m. on Tuesday, March 2nd, three landowners who have put in the effort to conserve their land will talk about their motivations, the methods they used and the challenges that they face in doing so. They will also discuss some of the benefits of private conservation.

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Monday, February 1, 2021

Adirondack Land Trust plans events to showcase Northern Forest Atlas

This winter the Adirondack Land Trust is hosting an online discussion and a field trip showcasing the Northern Forest Atlas, a collection of graphic tools for naturalists of all abilities.

At 10 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 9, Northern Forest Atlas Director Jerry Jenkins will present a virtual introduction to the atlas’s free online resources, including photographs, videos and other digital tools. Jenkins will also give a brief botany lesson from northernforestatlas.org.

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Monday, January 4, 2021

Adirondack Land Trust Buys Last Unprotected Shoreline on Thirteenth Lake

The Adirondack Land Trust has purchased 17 acres of land on the Thirteenth Lake’s 4.5-mile shoreline, marking the conservation of the last unprotected shoreline on Thirteenth Lake. The Lake is a headwater of Upper Hudson River and the largest body of water within the Siamese Ponds Wilderness.

New York State Forest Preserve borders the land on one side, while the Garnet Hill Property Owners Association borders the other. The latter is taking advantage of restrictive use covenants to ensure its lake shore property is protected.

The Adirondack Land Trust will be working along side the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation to integrate the Thirteenth Lake land into the 114,010-acre Siamese Ponds Wilderness, allowing for it to become public, and thereby protected under the Forever Wild clause of the NYS constitution.

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Sunday, November 22, 2020

HISTORICAL PROFILE: Coon Mountain of Westport

Continuing my hikes and bushwhacks to various peaks in the Adirondacks and exploring their history,  I paid a visit to Coon Mountain in the Town of Westport, Essex County. From the trailhead located off a dirt road called Halds Road, I made the short, 0.7-mile hike along the leaf-littered trail to the bare-rock lookout point. From the lookout, I found a nice view of Lake Champlain and North West Bay (below), and the Green Mountains of Vermont across the lake. I should note that the true summit of Coon Mountain is about 0.25-miles north-northwest of the lookout point and requires a bushwhack to get to.

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Saturday, July 25, 2020

Adirondack Land Trust to Host Virtual Conservation Series

The Adirondack Land Trust has announced three live, virtual programs to be held in August. The programs will feature land-protection staff, scientists studying the Adirondack Forests, and a conservation intern who will discuss the ups and downs of conservation fieldwork during COVID-19. The events will be free and open to the public. If you wish to register, or view more information you may do so by visiting the Adirondack land Trust Website.

The schedule is as follows:

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Friday, June 5, 2020

Adirondack Land Trust marks National Trails Day, hosts events

The Adirondack Land Trust invites everyone to get outside this spring and summer. While the organization had planned a volunteer work event for National Trails Day on Saturday, June 6, instead they offer a few ideas to recognize the event in a more socially distanced way:

—If you don’t feel safe clearing heavy brush or downed trees, simply take gloves and a trash bag with you to collect litter next time you walk in your local natural space.
—Learn how to identify and remove invasive garlic mustard.
—Conserved green spaces don’t protect themselves; consider making a gift to your local land trust.

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Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Upper Saranac Shoreline Protected Along Canoe Route

newly conserved land on Upper Saranac Lake courtesy Adirondack Land Trust The Adirondack Land Trust purchased five acres of forest along the shore of Upper Saranac Lake to ensure that a mile-long stretch of shoreline between Indian Carry and Indian Point remains forever wild.

The tract features 570 feet of rugged lakeshore edged by boulders and northern white cedars. The Adirondack Land Trust is expected to work with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) to transfer the land to the state to close a gap in the Saranac Lakes Wild Forest, which is protected under the “forever wild” clause of New York’s constitution as part of the Adirondack Forest Preserve. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 19, 2020

New Adirondack Land Trust Board Members

adirondack land trust new board membersThe Adirondack Land Trust has announced the addition of three new board members who bring expertise in private land conservation, farmland access for young farmers, and communications.

The mission of the Adirondack Land Trust is to forever conserve the forests, farmlands, waters and wild places that advance the quality of life of our communities and the ecological integrity of the Adirondacks. The land trust has protected 26,628 acres since its founding in 1984. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Adirondack Land Trust Staff Grows by Two

The Adirondack Land Trust has hired two conservation professionals to fill the new positions of philanthropy assistant and land protection manager. Kathy Woughter is expected to play a role in building support for the Adirondack Land Trust’s mission and work to connect people to conservation work, with a focus on young and diverse constituents.

Before moving to the Adirondacks this year, Woughter worked in higher education in Western New York, most recently as Vice President of Student Affairs at Alfred University. Woughter has won awards as an ally for diversity and cultural unity. Her husband Bob is the principal of Keene Central School. » Continue Reading.


Monday, June 3, 2019

2,400-Acre Eagle Mountain Preserve Established

Sunset at Copper Pond by Brendan Wiltse PhotographyAn expanse of 2,434 acres of Adirondack foothills at the headwaters of the Boquet River, including streams, ponds, and mature forest, has been protected.

The new Eagle Mountain Wilderness Preserve part of a large, intact forest that connects the High Peaks to lower elevation lands near Lake Champlain. Surrounding protected areas include New York State’s Jay Mountain Wilderness and Taylor Pond Wild Forest (home to the local landmark, Poke-O-Moonshine Mountain), as well as other privately conserved lands.

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