Posts Tagged ‘Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program’

Sunday, July 10, 2011

Dispelling the Myths About Invasive Species

What follows is a guest essay by Hilary Smith of the Adirondack Invasive Plant Program a founding member organization of the Adirondack Forest Preserve Education Partnership (AFPEP).

Some of the latest regional invasive species news has chronicled the detection of a new population of didymo, also known as “rocksnot.” Now in five rivers in NY, the closest of which is Kayaderosseras Creek with headwaters that lie in the southern Adirondacks, didymo is literally one step away from invading renowned trout streams such as the Ausable. A single celled alga that blankets riverbeds, didymo is easily spread on the felt soles of waders. » Continue Reading.


Monday, June 13, 2011

Adirondack Invasive Species Training Offered

Participants in the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program’s 10th annual aquatic invasive plant training program will learn aquatic plant identification tips and survey techniques for both native and aquatic invasive plants.

The training is free, but space is limited. Please RSVP by June 17 to hsmith@tnc.org and provide your name, contact info, training location and lake of interest.

Sessions are from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

June 28, Darrin Fresh Water Institute, Bolton Landing
or
June 30, Wanakena Ranger School on Cranberry Lake » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, April 5, 2011

Funding Boosts Invasive Species Program

The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) received a private foundation grant of $170,000 for invasive species prevention and control in 2011. One of the primary uses of funds will be to pilot a terrestrial regional response team, a four person seasonal crew that will manage terrestrial invasive plants in priority areas across the Adirondack region.

APIPP also directed funds to lend aid to three other projects including the Town of Inlet’s Regional Inlet Invasive Plant Program to control Japanese knotweed in various communities, Paul Smith’s College Watershed Stewardship Program to intercept aquatic invasive species at boat launches and the Lake George Asian Clam Rapid Response Task Force to control the first infestation of Asian Clam detected in the Adirondack Park. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 22, 2010

Adirondack Forum Will Consider Invasive Species

Registration is now open for a free Adirondack Forum on Invasive Species. The Forum, a one-and-a-half day event, will be held August 10-11 at Paul Smith’s College. You will learn how you and your community can be prepared for harmful invasive species invading Adirondack lands and waters.

The Forum will highlight initiatives underway in the region; showcase local successes and challenges as told by community members; feature up-to-date information about new invasive species; and identify important next steps that groups must collectively take to have a real and lasting impact on this challenging environmental and economic issue. » Continue Reading.


Monday, July 12, 2010

Adirondack Invasive Species Awareness Week Events

Adirondack Invasive Species Awareness Week is underway and groups around the region have stepped up to help spread the word about harmful invasive species.

Coincidentally, the New York State Invasive Species Council has just sent a report entitled A Regulatory System for Non-Native Species to Governor Patterson and the legislature for review. The new report by the NYS Invasive Species Council introduces a process for assessing level of threat, assessing socioeconomic value, and assigning each invasive species into a distinct category for appropriate action. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, July 10, 2010

Council Releases Plan to Combat Invasive Species

The New York State Invasive Species Council has submitted its final report to Governor David Paterson and the State Legislature. The report, titled “A Regulatory System for Non-Native Species,” recommends giving the Council authority to develop regulations for a new process that will prevent the importation and/or release of non-native invasive species in New York’s waterways, forests and farmlands. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, June 24, 2010

New Invasive Identified in Lake George Watershed

An invasive terrestrial plant, Mycelis muralis, commonly known as wall lettuce, has been identified growing alongside 9N near Dunham’s Bay in Lake George, according to the Lake George Association. Wall lettuce is one of several newer species that was placed on a watch list earlier this spring by the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program. This is the first time that the plant has been known to exist within the Lake George Watershed, although it has likely been growing for a few years without having been identified. Citizens are asked to contact the LGA if they believe this plant may be growing on their property, so that the organization can assess the spread of its growth. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, June 25, 2009

Milfoil Discovered in Lake Placid

The Board of Trustees of the Lake Placid Shore Owners’ Association (LPSOA) today reported that a strain or strains of milfoil have been discovered at three sites on Lake Placid. Over the past week, two separate samples were removed from Paradox Bay and one from East Lake. Biologists working with the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) have tentatively identified two of the samples as Variable Leaf Milfoil (VLM).

The University of Maine Cooperative Extension describes Variable Leaf Milfoil as “an aggressive aquatic plant that can form dense mats that congest waterways and crowd out native aquatic plants. Thick growth of this plant can impair recreational uses of waterways including boating, swimming and fishing. Dense growth of variable-leaf milfoil degrades the native habitat of fish and other wildlife, and may also provide breeding areas for mosquitoes. The main method of dispersal of this plant appears to be fragmentation. Plant fragments are moved around by people, animals and water currents.” » Continue Reading.


Sunday, May 3, 2009

Adk Invasive Program Wins EPA Environmental Quality Award

The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) was one of 26 projects across New York State to receive the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s highest honor: the Environmental Quality Award. The award ceremony was held last week in Manhattan in conjunction with Earth Day. Founded in 1998 and housed by The Nature Conservancy in Keene Valley, APIPP is leading the charge to protect Adirondack natural resources from the damaging effects of invasive species by engaging partners and finding solutions through a coordinated, strategic, and integrated regional approach. Unlike many places, the opportunity exists in the Adirondacks to hold the line against invasive species and prevent them from wreaking havoc on natural resources and economic vitality. » Continue Reading.



RSS Latest News Headlines

  • An error has occurred, which probably means the feed is down. Try again later.

RSS Latest News Headlines

  • An error has occurred, which probably means the feed is down. Try again later.

Recent Almanack Comments

Wait! Before you go:

Catch up on all your Adirondack
news, delivered weekly to your inbox