Posts Tagged ‘Adirondack Pollinator Project’

Thursday, June 24, 2021

Pollinator Week Article Collection

In recognition of Pollinator Week, we’ve compiled a selection of articles about pollinating birds and insects and the important roles they play.

National Pollinator Week: Who are the pollinators?

An article from last years pollinator week by Jackie Woodcock. Jackie show cases a few insects, birds, flowers, and lizards, explaining how each organism plays a roll in the pollination process.

National Pollinator Week 2020

Another article from last year’s pollinator week by the Adirondack Almanack, meant to highlight the critical importance of pollinators to biodiversity, food supply, and the economy.

Celebrate Spring by Planting Natives for Pollinator

An article from pollinator week 2019, while the sale advertised within is no longer going on, the information on planting and growing pollinator gardens is still valuable.

Creating Backyard Habitat for Pollinators

In this 2018 article, the Adirondack Pollinator Project presented two lectures by Kim Eierman, and environmental horticulturist specializing in ecological landscapes and native plants. The lectures are no longer available but the article still contains valuable information.

Wild Pollinators and Crop Viability

In this article by Richard Gast, he explains in depth the process of pollination and its uses. The article also provides more information from the Northeast Pollinator Partnership.

10 Ways You Can Help Pollinators

In this article from 2020, Jackie Woodcock explains the trouble that pollinators find themselves in, and 10 ways that you can be of assistance to them.

More to explore:

 

 


Tuesday, June 22, 2021

Calling all junior gardeners

This summer, AdkAction’s Mobile Pollinator Garden Trailer, or “Pollinator-Mobile,” will travel around the Adirondacks, helping plant eleven community pollinator gardens as part of their hands-on pollinator conservation efforts – and Mountain Lake PBS is bee-yond excited to get in on the action!

Join us on Friday, June 25th anytime from 2 to 4 PM! Kids can lend a hand and plant pollinator-friendly wildflowers in the garden, and then take home a seed packet to start their very own! Everyone leaves with a PBS KIDS activity bag and book to keep the fun and learning going at home.

Click here for information and to register


Sunday, June 20, 2021

Celebrate Pollinator Week with Activities in the Adirondacks

pollinator gardenAdkAction’s Adirondack Pollinator Project is pleased to announce the annual celebration of Pollinator Week, June 21-27, recognizing the invaluable role pollinators play in supporting biodiversity, food availability, and the economy.

An estimated one third of all foods and beverages is dependent on pollinators. In New York State alone, $350 million per year is accrued in services provided by bees and other pollinators. The work of pollinators ensures full harvests of crops and contributes to healthy plants everywhere. Vital pollinator populations are declining due to pesticide use, disease and parasite problems, and loss of food and nesting habitat.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, May 15, 2021

AdkAction to fund 11 new pollinator gardens

Pollinator Garden This summer, AdkAction’s Mobile Pollinator Garden Trailer (also affectionately known as the Pollinator-Mobile) will rove the Adirondacks, planting community pollinator gardens and leaving blooms, bees, and butterflies in its wake. Eleven new garden sites in and around the Adirondacks have been chosen to receive gardens as part of our hands-on pollinator conservation efforts.

What is a pollinator garden?

A pollinator garden is one planted mostly with flowers that provide nectar or pollen for a broad range of pollinating insects. Native flowering plants are best, and pesticides and other chemicals are avoided. These habitats can be beautiful and they attract birds and other wildlife in addition to pollinators. This year’s pollinator gardens will include bee balm, milkweed, white turtlehead, mountain mint, phlox, and other pollinator-friendly pesticide-free native plants.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Native Plant Sale and Community Gardens to benefit Adirondack Pollinators

pollinator plant saleAdkAction’s Adirondack Pollinator Project, in partnership with Lake Placid Land Conservancy, The Wild Center, and Paul Smith’s College is delighted to announce the start of its fourth annual Pollinator-Friendly Native Plant Sale, and the opening of applications for this year’s Community Pollinator Garden Assistance Program.

Pollinators sustain our ecosystems and produce our natural resources by helping plants reproduce, but are facing many threats, including habitat loss, pesticides, climate change, and disease. The Adirondack Pollinator Project envisions a future where pollinators thrive, native habitat abounds, and residents and visitors are engaged pollinator advocates. Both the plant sale and garden assistance program work to increase native habitat that will help rebuild the monarch butterfly population, attract hummingbirds, and strengthen native bee and moth populations.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, October 28, 2020

Leaf it Alone: Fall tips to help overwintering pollinators

Editor’s note: The following content was provided by AdkAction

When crisp fall weather arrives, and the last flowers of the late-blooming perennials have gone, it’s easy to forget that being a pollinator steward is a year-round job. However, there is much that can be accomplished in the fall to ensure that your local pollinators will thrive in the spring and summer.

While migratory pollinators such as Monarch butterflies and the Rufous hummingbird travel great distances to escape northern winters, many insect pollinators such as moths, butterflies, and bees stay right here all winter long, in a variety of developmental stages that allow them to endure the cold.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, June 22, 2020

National Pollinator Week 2020

The Adirondack Pollinator Project (APP) is once again celebrating National Pollinator Week, June 22-28, to highlight the critical importance of pollinators to biodiversity, food availability, and the economy. Pollinators help produce approximately 1/3 of the food we eat. In New York State alone, bees and other pollinators provide some $350 million in pollination services each year. This year’s programs are being delivered digitally.

The Adirondack Pollinator Project is a project of AdkAction in partnership with The Wild Center, The Lake Placid Land Conservancy, and Paul Smith’s College, with the mission of inspiring individual and collective action to help pollinators thrive. Creative digital program offerings throughout National Pollinator Week will allow people of all ages to learn about pollinators, gardening with native plants, and more.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, May 29, 2020

The Adirondack Pollinator Project: 2020 Plant Sale

AdkAction’s Adirondack Pollinator Project will be offering its annual “Pollinator Plant” sale again to help the hummingbirds, butterflies and bee population.

They have teamed up with Cook & Gardener Nursery and chose plants that can thrive in the Adirondacks. The plants offered have been sourced or grown from seeds to ensure no contact with neonicotinoids (a class of insecticides harmful to pollinators) and will help efforts to rebuild the monarch butterfly population, attract hummingbirds, and reinforce the native bee and moth population.

Plant orders are available online until June 15,  or while supplies last.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, June 3, 2019

Adirondack Pollinator Symposium Wednesday in North Creek

pollinator symposium 2019AdkAction’s Adirondack Pollinator Project is set to hold a Pollinator Symposium on June 5 at Tannery Pond Community Center, 228 Main Street in North Creek.

The Symposium will be aimed at equipping farmers, groundskeepers, public park managers, gardeners, and local government agencies with the knowledge to help preserve and build crucial pollinator populations in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 16, 2019

Pollinator Symposium Set For June

pollinator symposiumAdkAction’s Adirondack Pollinator Project is set to hold a Pollinator Symposium June 5 at Tannery Pond Community Center in North Creek, on Wednesday, June 5th, from 10 am to 4 pm.

The Pollinator Symposium will be aimed at equipping farmers, groundskeepers, public park managers, gardeners, and local government agencies with the knowledge to help preserve and build pollinator populations in the Adirondacks.  » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Celebrate Spring by Planting Natives for Pollinators

pollinatorsAdkAction’s Adirondack Pollinator Project has announced its second Pollinator Plant Sale. With the assistance of Cook & Gardener Nursery, these native pollinator plants and cultivars have been selected to thrive in the Adirondacks.

The plants have been sourced or grown from seed to ensure that they are free of neonicotinoids, a class of systemic insecticide that research shows is a major factor in Colony Collapse Disorder and loss of pollinator biodiversity. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Creating Backyard Habitat for Pollinators

Kim EiermanOn June 11 and 12, 2018, the Adirondack Pollinator Project is set to host two free public lectures by Kim Eierman, an environmental horticulturist specializing in ecological landscapes and native plants.

Attendees will have the opportunity to learn how to create habitat for pollinators in their own backyards. After the lecture, a one-hour reception will give guests the chance to ask questions and begin planning their own pollinator gardens. Free packet of wildflower seeds will be distributed and there will be a limited supply of pollinator plants for sale. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 6, 2018

Adirondack Pollinator Project Plant Sale Underway

monarch on echinaceaAn online Pollinator Plant Sale hosted by the Adirondack Pollinator Project is underway, and will continue through May 31st.

All flowers are local to the Adirondacks and were selected for their ability to attract pollinators, like bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. The plants are being cultivated without the use of pesticides by locally-owned Cook & Gardener Nursery in Plattsburgh. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Pollinator Science Lectures Planned For Wild Center, View

pollinators programAdkAction will host Dr. Christina Grozinger, associate professor of entomology at Penn State University and the director of the Penn State Center for Pollinator Research at The Wild Center and View Arts on Wednesday and Thursday, July 19th and 20th for a lecture titled, “The Global Pollinator Crisis.”

Receptions will be held at 6 pm, and the lectures will begin at 7 pm. The Wild Center lecture requires an RSVP, both lectures are free and open to the public.

Grozinger will explain the importance of pollinators such as bees to agricultural production. She will also discuss the various reasons for the global declines in pollinator populations that have been documented in recent years, including pesticides, parasites, viruses, reduced genetic diversity, poor management practices of managed pollinator populations, and habitat destruction. She will highlight ongoing research at Penn State University, where scientists are seeking to better understand the impacts of these factors on pollinator health, and to find solutions that could be implemented locally, nationally, and globally. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Pollinator Project Passing Out 30,000 Wildflower Seed Packets

Adirondack Pollinator ProojectADKAction has spent the past three years helping spread the word out about the importance of milkweed. With the distribution of over 20,000 free seed packets now Adirondack roadsides, gardens, and community parks are thriving with the Monarch butterflies only food source.

According to ADK Action Executive Director Brittany Christenson, the organization began the Milkweed project at the time when the plight of the Monarchs was also receiving a lot of national press. At the time, some people couldn’t even recognize Monarchs, let alone understand that milkweed was the only plant where Monarchs laid eggs.

“The timing of the project was perfect,” says Christenson. “After talking with people we feel that we were able to help get the word out. People are aware of the Monarch’s issue and know what they can do to help. Now we are focusing our attention on a broader range of pollinators.” » Continue Reading.