Posts Tagged ‘Adirondack wildlife’

Monday, November 27, 2023

Small Wonders: The Adirondack Squirrel Trio

Painting of a chipmunk on someone's hand

By Jackie Woodcock

Nestled within the landscape of the Adirondack Mountains, a lively trio of small mammals steal the spotlight. In the midst of the mountains, the enchanting dance of grey squirrels, red squirrels, and
chipmunks is not merely a wildlife spectacle but a therapeutic symphony for the soul. These charming creatures, belonging to the Sciuridae family, contribute to the rich tapestry of wildlife in the wilderness around us. The Adirondack’s pristine landscapes and diverse ecosystems, provide a serene backdrop for observing these small wonders. Nature has an innate ability to soothe the mind and nurture the spirit. Throughout the seasons my Husband and I Watch the agile leaps of grey squirrels, the fiery guardianship of red squirrels, and the ground-level antics of chipmunks that together create a balm for the stresses of life.

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Tuesday, May 2, 2023

If You Care, Leave It There: Respecting Wildlife Reminder

Fawn in grass.

As the weather warms up, it’s common to encounter local wildlife while walking, hiking, or biking. When you see these critters, leave them be and do your best not to disturb their natural routine.

Fawns are a great example of animals that may appear around your lawn, garden, or local trails. Newly born whitetail deer spend many of their early days hidden and protected among tall grass, leaf litter, or other natural and man-made shelters. You may find them laying in a flower bed, alongside a trail, or even curled up in an open field. Mother deer will return to their fawns regularly to nurse but may delay their next visit if they detect human activity nearby.

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Monday, May 9, 2022

DEC Shares Safety Tips on Spring Recreation in the Adirondacks


Mud Season Muddy Trail Adirondacks (Adirondack Mountain CLub Photo)The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) reminds visitors to recreate responsibly in the Adirondacks this spring to help protect State lands for future generations. Spring is an excellent time to get outdoors and enjoy warming temperatures, but it can also pose many risks to outdoor enthusiasts, wildlife, and natural resources. DEC encourages visitors to public lands to recreate responsibly to protect themselves and the resource.

Practice the Seven Principles of Leave No TraceTM: Leave No Trace™ principles provide a framework for safe and sustainable recreation. Based on outdoor ethics rather than rules, the principles provide guidelines that can be tailored to a variety of outdoor activities and an individual’s specific experience. Before heading out to visit State lands, DEC encourages outdoor adventurers to review and familiarize themselves with these principles to help be prepared, stay safe, and minimize damage to shared lands and waterways.

Follow the Muddy Trail Advisory: Hikers are advised to avoid hiking on high elevation trails above 2,500 feet until further notice. Despite recent warm weather, high elevation trails are still covered in slowly melting ice and snow. These steep trails feature thin soils that become a mix of ice and mud as winter conditions melt and frost leaves the ground. Sliding boots destroy trail tread, damage surrounding vegetation, and erode thin soils, increasing the likelihood of washouts; rotten snow and monorails are a safety hazard even with proper equipment; and high elevation and alpine vegetation are extremely fragile during this time.

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