Posts Tagged ‘ADK’

Sunday, September 11, 2022

ADK releases new edition of winter outings guidebook

snowshoe and ski guidebookADK (Adirondack Mountain Club) has released a new edition of its winter guidebook, Ski and Snowshoe Trails in the Adirondacks, by Tony Goodwin. 

First published in 2003, the second edition of ADK’s winter guidebook is a comprehensive collection of fifty popular and lesser-known adventures for all ability levels throughout the Adirondack Park. It includes the iconic trips like Mount Marcy and the Whiteface Mountain Toll Road, as well as lesser-known destinations, such as Hoffman Notch, Berrymill Flow, and Moxham Mountain.

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Tuesday, September 6, 2022

Summit stewards see rebound in hiker numbers 

summit stewards

In its 2022 midseason report, the Adirondack High Peaks Summit Stewardship Program reported a modest rebound in hiker contacts between May and July. The program stated that summit stewards spoke to an average of 81 hikers per day over that time period on Marcy, Algonquin, Wright, and Cascade, the four peaks with the most coverage by stewards. By comparison, the 2021 average was 62 hikers a day.

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Thursday, August 4, 2022

Uihlein Foundation supports Cascade Welcome Center projects 

cascade welcome center sign

The Henry Uihlien II and Mildred A. Uihlein Foundation Trust has awarded the Adirondack Mountain Club a $30,000 grant for facility improvements at Cascade Welcome Center. The grant will fund upgrades to the building’s infrastructure and visitor information area, including new windows, an electronic interpretive display, and improved public restrooms. A portion will also be used to purchase trail maintenance equipment needed for the upcoming winter ski season.

Acquired by ADK in April, Cascade Welcome Center is a visitor and education center that addresses high use in the High Peaks region, connects kids and families to nature, and improves access to the outdoors for all. Currently it offers visitor information, public restrooms, and free guided nature walks throughout its 200-acre property. In the winter season, it will offer 12 miles of groomed cross-country skiing and snowshoeing, including rentals and retail.

To learn more about Cascade Welcome Center, go to ADK.org, email cascade@adk.org, or call 518-837-5047.


Monday, July 25, 2022

ADK, The Nature Conservancy improve access at Silver Lake Bog Preserve

 

July 25, 2022 — Black Brook, NY — The Nature Conservancy’s Silver Lake Bog Preserve’s nature trail is now more safe, sustainable, and accessible after a month of work by ADK’s professional trail crew. Part of a multi-year effort to make the Silver Lake Bog Preserve more accessible to all, The Nature Conservancy in the Adirondacks contracted with ADK to rebuild a bridge, reroute unsustainable trail sections, and establish a formal trail to the bluff viewpoint, which includes wooden ladders to increase safety.

The Silver Lake Bog Preserve is a publicly accessible 98-acre property that features a boardwalk that winds through an ancient peatland bog, the unsung hero of carbon capture, hardwood forests, and spectacular views of the surrounding landscape. The improved trail travels 1.5 miles through the Preserve and features a 200-foot bluff overlooking Silver Lake and Whiteface Mountain.

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Wednesday, June 29, 2022

Mt Jo Long Trail project enters year two with community support

Lake Placid, NY —Professional and volunteer trail crews organized by ADK (Adirondack Mountain Club) are returning to Mt Jo this summer to continue building a new sustainable trail to the summit.

Serving over 15,000 hikers a year, Mt. Jo is an iconic mountain in North Elba that is often visited by first-time outdoor recreators and used as a classroom for ADK’s fourth grade school outreach program. After assessment, it was determined in 2020 that one of the two approaches to the summit—the Long Trail—had exceeded standards for sustainability and safety.

In response, ADK determined a new route, rallied support from donors and volunteers, and broke ground on the trail in 2021. Last November, the Town of North Elba backed the project by awarding ADK a $50,000 grant from the Local Enhancement & Advancement Fund (LEAF) to improve accessibility on the trail.

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Tuesday, June 28, 2022

ADK: Summit Stewards Return to High Peaks

Lake Placid, NY The Adirondack High Peaks Summit Stewardship Program has started its 33rd season of protecting New York’s alpine ecosystem. Summit stewards will be educating hikers on high peaks summits—namely Marcy, Algonquin, Wright, and Cascade—through Indigenous People’s Day. During this time, they will also be focused on expanding the program’s photopoint monitoring, which is key to showcasing the link between educational outreach and alpine vegetation recovery.

“We are excited to continue the important work of protecting New York’s alpine ecosystem,” said Kayla White, ADK Stewardship Manager. “The Summit Stewardship Program has been and continues to be one of the best examples we have of an outreach effort that has successfully shown people how to protect sensitive ecosystems while they enjoy them.”

Since the program’s founding in 1989, summit stewards have educated over 600,000 hikers about alpine vegetation and how to protect it. The result has been a remarkable recovery in vegetation on alpine-carrying summits in the High Peaks region, a trend that has held despite increases in visitor use over the last decade.

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Thursday, May 5, 2022

How Your Contributions Will Shape Cascade Ski Center

cascade ski center

Last month, ADK moved into Cascade Ski Center. After a year of negotiating, signing paperwork, and visioning, it felt a little surreal to enter the great room not as a visitor, but as part of an organization that now can tap into this property’s incredible potential.

Almost concurrently, we concluded a month of community engagement where we heard from over 100 people who took the time to share their feedback with us through group sessions, individual meetings, and emails. Representing everything from ADK members to local ski areas to state agencies, we heard from a diverse array of stakeholders who all shared in our enthusiasm for Cascade Ski Center’s potential. I want to thank each and every one of them for their time and input.

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Tuesday, March 1, 2022

ADK Purchased Cascade Ski Center . . . Now What?

cascade ski center

It’s a rare day that I’m not asked, whether it’s by email, phone, or even after being stopped in the grocery store: what is ADK going to do now that it has purchased Cascade Cross Country Ski Center? Great question. 

Let’s start with what we know: ADK’s intent broadly is to use Cascade Ski Center and its location to improve local recreational offerings, reach more visitors with educational outreach, and support local and state visitor use management goals. Within this framework, we already plan to continue offering groomed cross-country skiing and snowshoeing with rentals and retail in the winter months. In the summer, we will offer information services and restrooms to the general public.

What happens beyond that and the degree to which we align our efforts with certain initiatives will depend largely on your input as community members and stakeholders. There is a great deal of potential for what could be done there, ranging from meeting space for community groups to mountain biking to birding programs. We must also consider what needs to be done to ensure that the property facilitates access for everyone, regardless of background, to our incredible public spaces.

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Monday, November 22, 2021

Town of North Elba supports crucial community trail project 

mount jo

Lake Placid, NY — The Town of North Elba has awarded ADK (Adirondack Mountain Club) a $50,000 grant from the Local Enhancement & Advancement Fund (LEAF) to improve accessibility on the Mt. Jo Long Trail.

Serving over 15,000 hikers a year, Mt. Jo is an iconic mountain in North Elba that is often visited by first-time outdoor recreators and used as a classroom for ADK’s fourth grade school outreach program. However, the Long Trail—one of two approaches to the summit—is severely damaged, creating challenging conditions for hikers. 

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Monday, November 1, 2021

Adirondack 46ers give back to ADK trails program 

summit steward46ers support ADK professional trail crew for 21st consecutive year 

For the twenty-first consecutive year, the Adirondack 46ers have pledged support for ADK’s (Adirondack Mountain Club’s) professional trail crew by announcing a $46,000 donation to fund trail projects in the High Peaks Wilderness for the 2022 season. This is in addition to a 2020 commitment to donate $25,000 a year to ADK for the Adirondack High Peaks Summit Stewardship Program through 2023. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 28, 2021

ADK and DackMap work to bring information online for hikers 

DackMapDackMap Update Includes Online Parking Capacity, Virtual Trailhead Check-ins for High Peaks Region 

ADK and DackMap are excited to announce an updated version of the cellphone application that includes real-time information for hikers visiting the High Peaks Wilderness. After announcing a partnership back in March, ADK and DackMap have worked together to improve the app so that it reaches Adirondack Park visitors well in advance of their arrival. The update includes:

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Monday, June 28, 2021

ADK Resumes Free Naturalist Series at Heart Lake

ADK naturalistsAdirondack Mountain Club (ADK) is resuming its summer naturalist programming at Heart Lake. Visitors are welcome to explore the natural world of the Adirondacks through hands-on activities by attending one or all of the following Naturalist led interpretive programs, which will begin today, June 28, and run through August. All programs are free and open to the public.

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Sunday, March 28, 2021

New trails aim to undo mistakes of the past

poko moonshine trailwork

“The shortest distance between two points is a straight line”   – Archimedes

The early Greek mathematician posed this rule for flat surfaces, which the Adirondacks are anything but. Yet this was the scheme for our first mountain trails  –  hardly layouts, but ad hoc routes to get hikers and particularly Fire Observers,  to the summits ASAP.  After twisting past down trees, boulders, cliffs, or water, their lines would straighten right back out.  Trails out West more gently curve along the contours and switchback to ease their ascents, but not those here. Most of our old direct goat paths are still in place.

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Wednesday, March 24, 2021

Elizabeth ‘Bessie’ Little: Suffragette and charter member of ADK

Elizabeth W. Little was born in 1884, probably in the grand home that her grandparents built in Menands on the south side of the Menand Road in the 1860’s.

She was the daughter of Charles W. Little and Edith Elizabeth Herbert.  Elizabeth was the youngest of three daughters born to the C.W. Little family.   Elizabeth’s grandfather was Weare C. Little,  who was born in Bangor, Maine but moved to the Albany area and established a very successful book publishing and selling business on State Street in Albany by 1828.  By 1868, Weare C. Little’s name appears in the Albany City Directories as residing at Menands.   Tax records of 1870-71 show that he owned 46 acres of land with buildings in Menands.

The W.C. Little’s publishing company was very profitable, enabling him to purchase the 46 acres of very desirable land on the south side of the Old Menand Road just west of the present day entrance to the Sage Estate.  His land continued westward up the old Menand Road to a point about opposite of the present day intersection with Schuyler Road.

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Wednesday, March 10, 2021

ADK’s Support of Sustainable Trails

trail workIn 1921, nearly a hundred years ago, a few dozen people met with the idea of forming an organization that would help facilitate public access to the Adirondack wilderness through trail building. A year later the Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK) was formed and, soon thereafter, ADK completed the Northville-Placid Trail. In the years that followed, ADK has not only worked to educate the public on how to steward public lands but also advocated for their protection at the highest levels, including in the various New York State courts. And, as other advocacy groups came into the picture, it became the norm to join forces in our collective strength to litigate against anything that ran afoul of Article 14 of the NYS Constitution, the Forest Preserve’s “forever wild” provision. 

In response to impending construction on the proposed Class II Community Connector Snowmobile Trails—the center of today’s controversy—ADK went out and began counting trees along the intended corridor to assess the legality of this work and in anticipation of reconvening with the other Adirondack groups on how best to proceed. However, before we could, a lawsuit was singularly commenced. From the perspective of our traditional cooperation, this challenge was not off to a good start. Sadly, the arguments presented went well beyond challenging the proposed construction under the existing standard (3 inch dbh) that had served us well in balancing the Park’s wild nature with “facilitating meaningful public access and enjoyment.”

Instead, petitioners advocated for a new standard that will actually do considerable harm to the natural resources of the Forest Preserve. 

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