Posts Tagged ‘Alice Green’

Friday, April 22, 2016

John Brown Lives! To Recognize Danny Glover, Alice Green, Brother Yu

John Brown Day 2016 PosterActor and activist Danny Glover, Albany civil rights leader Alice Green and youth advocate Brother Yusuf Abdul-Wasi Burgess will be the first recipients of the Spirit of John Brown Freedom Award, to be awarded at the John Brown Day 2016 celebration on Saturday, May 7th, at 1 pm.

The annual event, which is organized by Westport-based human rights and freedom education project John Brown Lives!, will be held at the John Brown Farm State Historic Site in Lake Placid. The public is welcome. » Continue Reading.


Friday, January 18, 2008

Adirondack Region Martin Luther King Jr Day Events

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day is this Monday, January 21, 2008.

According to a press release from Adirondack Progressives: » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, November 22, 2005

The New York State Green Party Belongs Deserves Its Place in the "Two-Party System"

Reprinted from Metroland [original article here, at least until Thursday]. Green Party Members should get involved in the State Committee:

Time for a Two-Party System?

Though some in the suburbs of Saratoga County might disagree, I don’t think of Albany as a particular bastion of liberal politics. It does however, have an active, sordid political landscape, marked, of course, by its famously long Democratic Party dominance.

So it was interesting to realize that given the results of this year’s election, one wouldn’t be crazy to surmise that if Albany does break into a true multiparty give-and-take some time soon, it may not be the Republicans, the country’s presumed “second party,” who take us there.

Granted, if parties had to earn their ballot line separately in Albany, rather than just getting 50,000 votes for their gubernatorial candidate on your line—which in 2002 worked out to about 1.1 percent of the total votes cast—then Republicans, with 6.5 percent of the vote for mayor, would not be in immediate danger of going the way of the Liberals or the Right-to-Life Party. (Or, yes, the Greens, who lost their state ballot line in 2002; they just seem to have managed to stay active as a party despite that, which the other two have not.)

The Republicans also fielded some interesting and committed candidates this year. I suspect that in at least some races their poor showing had less to do with them, and more to do with the legacy of Democratic Party dominance—when you have one party for so long, it becomes a very large tent. There’s little to stop fairly conservatively leaning folks from ending up running on the Democratic line—that’s how one gets elected after all—and therefore getting used to voting on the Democratic line.

This is not an intractable problem, but it doesn’t seem like Albany’s Republicans—who also have been needing to spend some attention trying not to lose ground in the rapidly Democratizing Albany County suburbs—have yet hit on the formula to draw people back.

On the other hand, the results, not to mention the buzz and the attention, of this November’s election point to the fact that in the city of Albany, the Working Families Party and the Green Party are perhaps closer to that formula. They’ve both been working very hard to build their bases and be a presence on local and regional issues outside of elections.

The Working Families Party, of course, has the immense strategic advantage of retaining its ballot line and being willing, usually, to use it to support candidates also running on major party lines (though not in Albany, it should be noted that they have in fact cross-endorsed Republicans). The Greens have their own strength, however, because they are not afraid to stand completely independent, rather than aiming at mostly shifting the Democratic Party in one direction or another.

Especially after conflicts over last year’s district attorney primary, the WFP is careful not to be seen as trying to influence Democratic Party primaries. (The same cannot be said, for example, of the Conservative Party and its mailings about city treasurer Betty Barnette.) Still, the WFP does seem to have gained enough influence and respect that merely making its endorsements for its own line before the Democratic primary carries some weight with voters. Shawn Morris, the WFP candidate for Common Council president, sailed to victory despite her history of being willing to confront the mayor, and ended up getting more total votes in the general election than Jennings did.

And for its part, when the Green Party fields candidates like Alice Green and David Lussier who are willing to do the legwork, they can get impressive results. Alice Green got nearly 25 percent of the vote. She may still be an underdog, but that’s not a dismissible number.

WFP and the Greens endorsed two candidates in common this year—David Lussier in Ward 11 and Russell Ziemba (who also had the Democratic line) in Troy. Reportedly, if Alice Green hadn’t held back on her campaign announcement in order to not steal Archie Goodbee’s thunder, she may have had a chance at the WFP line for mayor as well—and we can all only wonder what might have happened then.

Karen Scharf, chair of the local WFP, and Mark Dunlea, state Green Party chair, both are interested in collaborating more in the future. The two parties are planning to meet and talk about how to follow up on some of the key issues locally. This sounds incredibly promising.

Here’s what I would love to see—I’d love to see the Green Party get their ballot line back in next year’s gubernatorial election, and then locally I’d like to see the two parties more frequently cross-endorse candidates, pooling their strengths and similar commitments to democratic process and reform. But I’d also like to see them maintain their independence, each sometimes taking risks or making commitments to candidates when the other won’t, and generally providing an opportunity for the voters to indicate their support for specific agendas and priorities.

That could bring Albany the power of a viable second party, with the variety and protection against calcification provided by active third parties. Who knows, it might even provide the climate for the Republicans to get back in the game.

—Miriam Axel-Lute

[email protected]


Tuesday, November 8, 2005

Adirondack Region Elections


Wednesday, October 26, 2005

Ralph Nader supports Adirondack native Alice Green in race for Albany Mayor

ADK Almanack has been following the campaign of Albany mayoral candidate and progressive ADK native Alice Green – yesterday Ralph Nader was in town to support her candidacy, demand the current mayor Gerald Jennings, a.k.a. sun-tan man, debate her and to oppose the Abany Convention Center debacle.

Democracy in Albany has mixed feelings about the Nader-Green appearance, but did like one thing that Nader said:

“The mayor is a back-door escape artist who doesn’t want any exchange with organized citizenry,” said Nader, who said the city’s one-party domination means “that you don’t have an election, you have a coronation.”

That sounds like another fine institution about 45 minutes north.


Tuesday, October 11, 2005

Adirondack Native Alice Green – Albany’s Next Mayor? Esmond Lyons Who?

Adirondack native Alice Green has been getting some good press lately. Capital News 9 reports that she is opposing a new corporate giveaway convention center and Times Union recently gave her good placement on her plan for a criminal justice center. The popular Albany political blog Democracy in Albany has been giving her generally good marks all around.

Closer to home – the Glens Falls Post Star, which we suggested should be required to register as a PAC, has been busy ignoring independent candidates. Matt, of Matt’s Angry Letters, has finally cancelled his subscription and Brian the Fairly Young Contrarian has been giving them hell as well. Meanwhile… the local Glens Falls Democrats have had a webpage since the campaigns began that offers NOTHING, that’s not a rhetorical nothing, that’s an absolute nothing – apparently that’s their plan for the city.

The question is – what will the independent candidates do about it? How about filing a complaint with election officials? Demonstrating at their offices? Something! Anything! Clearly the Post Star is out of control, undemocratic, and illegally promoting certain candidates.


Wednesday, August 3, 2005

See Alice Run. Hear Alice Run. Esmond Who?

In case you missed it, Adirondack native and Green Party Albany mayoral candidate Alice Green was featured on WAMC. At the same time, the Glens Falls Post Star is hosting a “debate” with only the most conservative TWO of the FOUR people who are running for Mayor of Glens Falls (get it while you can since it looks like that’s the only place you’ll find it). I’ll bet Metroland wants to take that “Best of 2005” award back now. I know independent candidate Esmond Lyons wishes they would – he’s had what amounts to no coverage from the folks at the ComPost Star.

UPDATE: Matt reports by e-mail that:

Since May 1st , the number of stories in the Post-Star per candidate is as follows;

Bud Taylor 68
Pete McDevitt 39
Esmond Lyons 22
William Berg 20
Leroy Akins 20
This is the number of stories published since May 1st in which the candidate in question is mentioned (not to be confused withe being written about or covered). It should be noted that the Democrat and the two independents running are mentioned less than a third as often as Bud Taylor and half as often as his SAME-PARTY “opponent”. The truth, in total, is that most stories that mention Bud or Peter are actually ABOUT them, primarily. The mention of the the other three candidates is usually just a casual mention that they’re running as a tag line tacked on to the end of the story. They are denied voice and are often neither quoted nor consulted.

Amazing.

UPDATE AGAIN: baloghblog has endorsed Independent and Green minded Jacob Roberts for Mayor of Syracuse. Who says there aren’t choices? Now if we could only get the local media to recognize them.


Thursday, July 14, 2005

Progressive ADK Native Annouces for Albany Mayor

The Almanack is happy to hear that our good friend Alice Green is running for Mayor of Albany against the sun-tan man and his Democratic Machine (which is not as dead as we’re led to believe) and on the Green Party line. Alice, is known and loved in the Essex County area for her sponsorship of The Paden Institute and Retreat for Writers of Color and her work with the progressive / radical historical activist group John Brown Lives! [Tech Heads! They need a site! Volunteer!].

She was instrumental in getting the NY Green Party ballot status when she ran for Lt. Governor with “Grandpa” Al Lewis a few years back. They’ve since lost it again, thanks to the undemocratic alliance between the two major parties who have worked long and hard to squash citizen involvement. The usual corporate suspects are already lining up in opposition.

Alice has a long history of hard work for the under-represented – we know, just like Esmond Lyons in Glens Falls, that she’d make a great mayor. She’ll be talking with former NYS Green Party Chair Mark Dunlea on his WRPI radio program tonight at 5 pm.

Alice needs 1,500 valid signatures to get on the ballot, and petitioners to help her. The petitioning period
started Tuesday (July 12) and ends August 23. She will also need donations, and people to help with various campaign tasks, phone banking, literature drops, registering new voters, etc.

You can reach the campaign at 463-8653 or [email protected].

Send donations to:

Friends of Alice Green
PO Box 8481
Albany, NY 12208



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