Posts Tagged ‘APIPP’

Sunday, August 13, 2017

New Adirondack Research On Invasive Phragmites

Lake Placid Wetland - Phragmites Management TimelapsePractitioners from the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) and researchers from Cornell University published the results of a seven-year study evaluating management of Phragmites australis (Phragmites), an aggressive wetland invasive plant, in the Adirondacks.

Published in the latest issue of Biological Invasions, “Management of invasive Phragmites australis in the Adirondacks: a cautionary tale about prospects of eradication,” documents broad success in controlling the species and suggests that over 70% of infestations within the interior Adirondacks will eventually be successfully eradicated, allowing native species to recolonize.

Since 2010, APIPP has managed 334 infestations of Phragmites in the interior Adirondacks. As of 2016, 212 of these managed sites have been documented as Phragmites-free; 104 have been documented as Phragmites-free for three consecutive years and are deemed eradicated. Researchers point to two primary reasons for this success: Small size of Phragmites infestations upon discovery (average size is less than one acre); and APIPP’s sustained early detection, rapid response, and monitoring efforts. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 1, 2017

APIPP To Receive Lakes Alliance Stewardship Award

Aquatic Response Team - Invasive Milfoil ManagementAdirondack Lakes Alliance Inc., representing lake and river associations throughout the Adirondack region, has named the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP), as the recipient of the 2017 Distinguished Stewardship Award.

This award is presented annually by ALA to an organization or individual advancing significant contributions in protecting and preserving Adirondack waters. APIPP will receive this award at the 2017 Adirondack Lakes Alliance Symposium being held at Paul Smith’s College on August 11th. » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 7, 2017

Invasive Species Awareness Week July 9-15

So far this summer has been rain with just enough sun to grow everything I’ve planted and sprout other seeds I never knew existed. Since I like the weeds and wildflowers (Joe-pye weed, milkweed, bunchberry, and wild wintergreen), I just leave the unidentified plants alone.  I save wildflowers from the center of our yard by transplanting them into flowerbeds or alongside our house, fences, and roadside.

Since not all non-native plants are invasive, it’s important to find out what plants are causing harm to the environment and make sure I’m not contributing to the problem. I don’t want to bring anything into the yard that is considered an Adirondack invasive, I’ve always taken advantage of the Cornell University Cooperative Extension team of master gardeners to answer questions, look at samples, and provide a bevy of useful information. I want my garden to be a safe haven for any pollinators. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Invasive Species Awareness Week Events Announced for the Adirondacks

invasive species awareness weekNew York State’s fourth annual Invasive Species Awareness Week (ISAW) will take place July 9th-15th. The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is collaborating with various partner organizations to offer more than 15 invasive species related events, including  Backcountry Water Monitors Training, Terrestrial Invasive Plant ID & Survey Training, Lake Champlain Water Chestnut Paddle & Pull, and Adirondack Invaders Day at The Wild Center. » Continue Reading.


Friday, June 9, 2017

Invasive Species Trainings in the Adirondacks

AIS-training: Volunteers are shown how to complete survey data sheets to contribute to a region-wide lake monitoring program led by APIPP's Aquatic Invasive Species Program Coordinator Erin Vennie-VollrathThe Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is offering a series of free training sessions to help protect Adirondack woods and waters from the harmful impacts of invasive species this summer. These workshops are open to the public.

Participants can learn to identify, survey for and manage invasive species currently threatening the Adirondack region, such as Japanese knotweed and Eurasian watermilfoil, as well as those that pose significant risk to the region, but have not yet arrived, such as hydrilla and mile-a-minute weed. » Continue Reading.


Monday, July 11, 2016

Invasive Species Awareness Week Events Underway

Invasive Species Awareness Week eventsNew York State’s third annual Invasive Species Awareness Week is taking place through July 16th.

The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) and its partners have organized a lineup of free invasive species related events to be held during Invasives Week for all ages and interests. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Adirondack Forest Pest Summit Planned For Monday

Hemlock woolly adelgidThe Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) and the Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK) are co-hosting an Adirondack Forest Pest Summit, a free conference meant to help raise awareness about invasive insects negatively affecting New York forests. The event will take place at the Tannery Pond Community Center in North Creek from 10 am to 4 pm on Monday, July 11th.

Forest pests such as hemlock woolly adelgid, emerald ash borer, and Asian long-horned beetle have the potential to cause major environmental and economic damage to the Adirondack region. These forest invaders are often spread by accidental transfer of firewood or nursery stock from an infested area. Prevention, early detection, and rapid response are critical to successfully combating any invasive species. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, December 2, 2015

A Return To The Pharaoh Lake Wilderness

Cathy Pedler's family on the summit of Pharoah Mountain around 1900Although I’ve been working in Albany with the Adirondack Mountain Club over the past two years, the Adirondack Park is relatively new to me.  It’s not new to my family. I am beginning to discover a long familial history with the Adirondacks.

My father recently found an old photo album documenting trips from Philadelphia in 1900 and 1903 when my great-grandmother visited Schroon Lake and hiked Pharaoh Mountain with her family. They traveled to NYC and then made their way north on the Hudson by riverboat.

This summer I traveled back to the area my family visited 115 years ago. I walked to the shore of Schroon Lake for the first time and paddled Lost and Berrymill Ponds in the Pharaoh Lake Wilderness. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, October 21, 2015

On The Search For Invasive Species At Limekiln Lake

Limekiln LakeHydrilla. Eurasian watermilfoil. Parrot feather. Yellow floating heart. I listened to the captivating and often funny Scott Kishbaugh of the Department Environmental Conservation go through 14 aquatic invasive plants at the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program’s Aquatic Invasive Plant Identification and Survey Techniques training. This past June, the Speculator Pavilion was packed with eager volunteers excited to survey their lakes for invasive plants that cause economic, ecologic, and societal harm. The four-hour workshop gave us the education we need to scope out invaders in ponds, rivers, and lakes. » Continue Reading.