Posts Tagged ‘apples’

Thursday, October 27, 2022

Building a Better Apple 

Where Do Apples Come From? 

Apples are the most-consumed fruit in the United States. The annual estimated total value of the American apple industry is $23 billion, with just five cultivars; Fuji, Gala, Granny Smith, Honeycrisp, and Red Delicious; making up two-thirds of production. Of these, Honeycrisp is easily the most valuable; having nearly twice the value per pound, if not more, than any of the others.

A few of weeks ago, I was sharing a couple of Honeycrisp apples with a friend and his granddaughter. As the youngster devoured a slice of apple… and then ate another… and another… and another… enjoying the juicy sweetness of each crunchy bite, she asked, “Where do apples come from?”

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, September 11, 2022

September Harvest of the Month: Apples

applesApples are one of the most historically, culturally, and economically significant fruits on earth. It’s estimated that humans have been eating apples since 50,000 BCE. Today, there are currently over 7,500 known cultivars of apples, ranging from small, green and tart, to big red sweet globes. The modern apple is thought to have been domesticated in modern-day Kazakstan 4,000-10,000 years ago. 

Apples are not native to New York State or the United States at all. However, today there are over 42,360 acres of apple orchards in the state of New York, which is second in the US behind the state of Washington for apple production. The United States (5M tons/year)  is second only to China (50M tons/year) in apple production. 

So how did the United States become a leader in growing a fruit that is relatively new to the area? 

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, October 17, 2021

The Real Johnny Appleseed

apples

There’s little in life more pleasing than biting into a fresh, crisp, juicy, mouth-watering, slightly sweet, slightly tart, apple. And what could be healthier? Apples contain vitamins C and A, antioxidants, potassium, pectin, fiber, and no cholesterol. They can be eaten fresh, baked, or stewed. They can be juiced or turned into cider; made into sauce, butter, jelly, vinegar, and wine; or cooked into pies, crisps, crumbles, cakes, doughnuts; even meat dishes. They make delightful confections when coated with candy (sugar syrup), caramel, or toffee and nuts, too.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, October 31, 2020

Eat local: Farmhouse Apple Crisp

Farmhouse Apple Crisp


This has to be one of my favorite comfort food recipes of all times. When I was growing up, my mom would make apple crisp in a giant pan. As soon as the crisp came out of the oven, my sisters and I would descend on the hot pan like ravenous vultures, happily devouring every last crumb. Although this version won’t make the giant pan-sized apple crisp that my mom made, it will allow you to enjoy the exact same delicious apple crisp that my sisters and I did, and still do to this day. Enjoy!

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Saturday, September 19, 2020

Local food: Easy Chunky Applesauce

SnapDragon Apples courtesy Kevin Maloney Dept of HorticultureOnce you have eaten fresh, homemade applesauce, there is no going back to the sad, canned stuff! This recipe is simple, quick, and will make your kitchen smell incredible while it is cooking. Although you can use any type of apple, if you use apples that are bursting with flavor – especially ones picked fresh from your local orchard – then your applesauce will taste even better! If you would like to substitute stevia or another sugar substitute for the brown sugar, use one teaspoon of stevia for the 3 Tablespoons of brown sugar called for in this recipe. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, October 10, 2019

Applefest at Ironworks, Penfield Homestead on Sunday

Ironville Works MapThis weekend is the final seasonal celebration for the “birthplace of the electric age.” Located at the old Crown Point Iron Company Works in Ironville, the Penfield Homestead Museum is hosting its annual celebration of everything apple. Though apples may be one of the reasons to go to the Penfield Homestead, also plan to visit the museum dedicated to preserving the history of the North Country’s ironwork industry during the 19th century. » Continue Reading.


Monday, September 23, 2019

It’s Apple Season!

SnapDragon Apples courtesy Kevin Maloney Dept of HorticultureThere’s little in life more pleasing than biting into a crisp, juicy, slightly sweet, slightly tart, fresh-off-the-tree apple. And what could be healthier? Apples contain vitamins A and C, antioxidants, potassium, pectin, fiber, and no cholesterol. They can be eaten fresh, baked, or stewed; turned into juice or cider; made into sauce, butter, jelly, vinegar, wine, and delightful confections when coated with candy (sugar syrup), caramel, or toffee and nuts; or cooked into pies, crisps, crumbles, cakes, doughnuts; even meat dishes.

New York’s apple harvest is underway. And it’s shaping up to be a good one. Early season varieties are now available at area orchards, farm stands, pick your own locations, and farmers’ markets. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 5, 2018

Local Agriculture: Prairie’s Orchard

prairies orchard signWhen Dan and Brandyn Prairie purchased their home on County Route 24 (the Brainardsville Rd), Malone in 2013, Dan really wanted to utilize the open field behind their home to grow a crop. After a lot of thought, he ended up narrowing his choices down to either planting a vineyard or an apple orchard. Dan eventually settled on growing apples, not only because of their profitability potential but also because it would be something the family enjoyed doing together. In the spring of 2014, Prairie’s Orchard was established with the planting of sixty Macintosh and sixty Honey Crisp trees. Since then, more trees have been planted each spring with plans to continue to do so. » Continue Reading.


Friday, May 5, 2017

Rulf’s Orchard 65th Anniversary Celebration

What started as a small dairy farm in 1952 with 12-acres of apple trees has now grown to be an farmstand destination in Peru, NY. Over the past 65 years, Rulf’s Orchard has expanded from its modest roots to include seasonal vegetables, Pick-U-Own Blueberries and Strawberries, a corn maze, year-round bakery, and a pumpkin patch. It’s the fresh apples and cider that always have my family coming back. This Saturday, the staff and owners of Rulf’s are throwing their own anniversary party to commemorate their 65th anniversary.

According to Rulf’s Office Manager Amanda Whisher, they are finally able to show off their new building and showcase the greenhouses. Though the new addition was completed in September, the staff at Rulf’s wanted to wait until spring to celebrate their latest transition. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Growing and Buying Heirloom Apples

heirloom applesAs Eve so famously discovered, apples are alluring. These brightly colored orbs tempt us with crisp flesh and juicy sweetness. It’s no wonder that apples have spread throughout the temperate regions of the world.

The mother of all apples, malus sieversii, which originated in the rugged mountains of Central Asia, has given rise to thousands of varieties over time, bearing names ranging from regal to whimsical, including Maiden’s Blush, Blue Pearmain, Bellefleur, Duchess of Oldenburg, and Seek No Further. Apples first arrived in the Americas in the 1600s, and by the early nineteenth century were being grown to make everything from cider, sauce and pies to apple butter. » Continue Reading.


Monday, November 30, 2015

Clarkie: The Life of a Northeastern Black Bear

Black Bear and CubsLast week, a black bear in a blaze orange collar showed up in our yard. Two cubs followed close behind. The sow paused to observe the house, then led her cubs up across our field and down into a small stand of apple trees beside the road. There the family feasted on piles of old apples lying in the grass. They appeared to take a methodical approach, working their way from one tree to the next.

Inside our house, the scene was not nearly as calm. There were rushed attempts at photography, foiled by warped window glass. There was my two-year-old son, precariously balanced on the back of a chair by the window, shrieking “BEAR” and occasionally, “SHOES” – his way of demanding to go outside. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Fruit Tree Pruning at Sugar House Creamery

treepruning_newMy husband and I planted two apple trees the year we moved into our farmhouse. That was the first and only year that we’ve gotten any apples. We haven’t even seen a blossom since. We drive past our neighbor’s trees loaded with fruit and wonder what we can do.

Our first step has been to install fences. We’ve worked hard to keep the grazing deer from completely obliterating the small trees. The next step was to attend a tree-pruning workshop. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 26, 2015

Christmas Trees, Fruit Trees At Friday Farm Talk

Saratoga Apple1Warren County Soil & Water’s next“Farm Talk” will focus on growing Christmas trees and fruit trees. The first presentation of the night is “Christmas Tree Farming: We’ll get you in the Spirit” with Mark Brown of Brown’s Tree Farm. The second presentation of the night will be “Planning a Small Fruit Tree Farm: Where do you start?” with Nate Darrow of Saratoga Apple.

The talks will be held this Friday, March 27th, from 6 to 8 pm at the DEC’s Warrensburg Office, 232 Golf Course Road, in Warrensburg. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, December 7, 2013

After I Pick the Fruit: The Lives of Migrant Women

UnknownA large percentage of the farm workers who harvest New York State’s apples, potatoes, onions, and other fruits and vegetables are immigrants working long hours with no overtime pay, few benefits, low salaries, often substandard housing, and no right to collective bargaining, as those rights fought for over fifty years ago in California by Cesar Chavez were excluded from being applied here.

Illegal immigrants comprise approximately five percent of this workforce. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, September 22, 2013

Cabin Life: Fall Has Arrived

ApplesThe fire is crackling, the dew is settling and the full moon is so bright that I can clearly see the two does quietly munching on fallen apples in the lower field.  They don’t seem to mind that Pico and I are outside, and quite frankly, I’m happy that they don’t.

Fall is here.  About half of the hardwoods around have either lost all their leaves or are changing color as we speak.  I think it’ll be a poor year for fall colors.  Too many trees have already changed, and there are still plenty that are solid green.  The colors are changing too slowly for there to be any real “peak” this year.

The other very noticeable change is the amount of daylight we are having.  It’s starting to get dark around seven-thirty, as opposed to the nine or nine-fifteen of a few months ago.  It’s more tolerable now, with the solar panel powering a couple of nice LED lights.  But still, winter is coming and it won’t be all that long. » Continue Reading.



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