Posts Tagged ‘archeology’

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Crown Point Landscape and Archaeology Talk

michael roetsOn Tuesday, October 25 at 7:30 pm, the Whallonsburg Grange Hall will present “Landscape Preservation and Archaeology of Crown Point: An Overview and Recent Discoveries,” with archaeologist Michael Roets. This is the fifth lecture in the fall Lyceum series entitled “Living on This Land.”

This lecture will discuss the history of the site and the preservation of the ruins of two National Historic Landmark colonial fortifications. The visible above ground features of the site will be explored and discussed in relation to historical documents and the findings of archaeological excavations. » Continue Reading.


Friday, April 8, 2016

Fort Fever Talk Explains Ticonderoga Redoubts

redoubt event fort tiFort Ticonderoga’s final Fort Fever lecture for 2016 takes place on Sunday, April 10, at 2 pm with “Building 18th-Century Redoubts” presented by Assistant Military Programs Supervisor Nicholas Spadone.

From theory to practice, the lecture will examine the construction of redoubts along the Ticonderoga peninsula. This program looks at the science and geometry used in the layout process closely followed by American officers. Participants will be able to explore the literature that influenced young officers to make such fortifications in a brand new American Army.

“Building 18th-Century Redoubts” will begin with a presentation in the Mars Education Center and conclude with a walking tour of Fort Ticonderoga’s redoubts, the largest surviving network of Revolutionary War earthworks in North America. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, November 22, 2015

A Lake George Steam Whistle Recalls A Bygone Era

Lake George - The Adirondac - Lake George Mirror File PhotoFor some folks, the bright notes they hear whenever Shoreline Cruises’ Adirondac circles Bolton Bay have a familiar ring.

That’s because they’re piped from an old fashioned brass steam whistle that once belonged to the Pamelaine, the private steamboat of Bolton Landing’s own Mason ‘Doc’ Saunders.

The Adirondac’s pilots blow the whistle in honor of Saunders, who died in 2006. Back in the day, that is, in the 1960s and 70s,  Lake George experienced something of a steamboat revival, and Mason Saunders quickly became its ringmaster. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, July 25, 2015

The Search for William Wood’s Cabin on Raquette Lake

Wood's Cabin 1851 Jervis McInteeMy last article identified the most likely location of the original cabin built by Matthew Beach and William Wood in the mid-1830s on Raquette Lake. Wood remained on Indian Point until 1859, but sometime between 1844 and 1846 he had a falling out with Beach and built a separate cabin (shown in this 1851 sketch from Jervis McEntee’s diary). » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 5, 2015

An Adirondack Mystery: What Is It?

Danker Farm  Foundation 1Hiking through any abandoned “working landscape” in the Adirondacks you are likely to come across evidence of the people that were here before: a lilac bush deep in the forest, an old butternut tree, perhaps an odd patch of daylilies, and, of course, old cellar holes and stonewalls.

The old Danker Farm in Johnsburg is just such a place. It probably hasn’t been used for any real farming for almost a century now. Like most abandoned farms in the Adirondacks, its pastures and fields have grown up to a chaotic mixture of poplar, white pine, fir, maple, beech and white birch. And, like most old farmland, the property is littered with old stone foundations and crumbling stonewalls. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, October 31, 2013

The Story of Two Graves: Nat Foster and Peter Waters

peter waters by bridge DSCF0717In January 2010, the Weekly Adirondack reported that the St. Regis Mohawk nation agreed to be a “consulting party” for the East Side Pumping Station project, a station to be built along the Moose River behind the American Legion building in Old Forge. The tribe was contacted because a member was buried in the proximity, on the opposite side of the river, about one hundred eighty years earlier. That person, Peter Waters (a.k.a. Drid), was shot fatally by Nathaniel Foster, Jr. on September 17, 1833 at a location known alternately as Murderer’s Point or Indian Point, where the channel from Old Forge meets First Lake.

Less than twenty years (1850) afterwards, the events preceding the shooting and its aftermath were described in great detail, including trial testimony, by Jeptha Simms in Trappers of New York, which remains the primary source for that part of John Brown’s Tract history today. While the events surrounding the shooting have become a part of history and folklore, influenced by changing attitudes about Foster and toward Native Americans, another parallel story can be told about the graves of these two men. The remains of the two men who were opposing forces when alive, shared unsettled treatment after their burial. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Timbuctoo, Minority Voices in Nature Poetry Programs Set

Some of the nation’s most acclaimed poets from widely diverse backgrounds will read their work as it deals with nature about writing at Paul Smith’s College VIC on August 7th

The natural world is everywhere, and we all react to it differently. How does race influence a poet writing about the natural world?  For example, a tree, for a southern black writer may have sinister qualities due to the history of lynching that a northern white writer would never consider. Acclaimed poets Cornelius Eady, Aracelis Girmay and Chase Twichell will all read their work. Following the reading will be a discussion led by poet Roger Bonair-Agard. This is expected to be a provocative discussion on race, religion, and how these factors affect one’s relationship with the natural world. The program starts at 7 p.m.; the cost is $5. » Continue Reading.