Posts Tagged ‘Astronomy’

Friday, December 6, 2013

Photographing The Night Sky Over Whiteface

Night Sky over WhitefaceNight photography has always fascinated me.  Photography is all about light and I can’t help but wonder how long that light has journeyed through space before hitting the sensor on my camera.  The following were the camera settings used: f3.5, 30sec, ISO 3200.


Friday, November 29, 2013

Ed Kanze: Artemis, Greek Goddess of Nature

ed_kanze_orionThe Greeks had gods, lots of them. In their cosmology women ruled the heavens and the earth along with the men. Join me and listen as I meet Artemis, the Greek goddess of nature.

As Orion learned, she’s a mixed bag—a friend of nature but not always a friend of men, especially ones who find her attractive…Learn more in this week’s edition of All Things Natural with Ed Kanze. » Continue Reading.


Kid next to water
Saturday, November 16, 2013

Hunting With The Phases Of The Moon

ADK ALM 1If I had to pick a single three-day period to hunt whitetail deer, the full moon in November would be it. November’s full moon is this Sunday the seventeenth. Many of my elders have talked about the November full moon – the hunters full moon – as the peak of the deer mating season. I myself have taken some of my best whitetails on this upcoming weekend and I’m eager to get another shot this year.

I’ve found that animals in their natural habitats generally tend to be more active during a full moon. I’ve found this true with mammals as well as fish. Becoming familiar with the moon phases and the role they play in deer hunting is sure to improve your chances. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 18, 2013

International Observe the Moon Night in Bolton

International Observe the Moon Night in the AdirondacksMoon enthusiasts, stargazers, and anyone else interested in learning more about space will be interested in International Observe the Moon Night, sponsored by the Lake George Land Conservancy, and held at Up Yonda Farm Environmental Education Center in Bolton Landing, on Saturday, October 12 from 6 – 8 pm.

International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN) is an annual event that is dedicated to encouraging people to ‘look up’ and take notice of our nearest neighbor, the Moon. From looking at the Moon with a naked eye to using the most sensitive telescope, every year on the same day, people from around the world hold events and activities that celebrate our Moon. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, May 19, 2013

Photo: Northern Lights Across Brant Lake on Saturday

Brant Lake Northern Lights (5-18-2013) Carl Heilman PhotoA large sunspot has been active on the sun lately, and I happened to be up to see the glow of the aurora across Brant Lake in the wee hours of the Saturday morning. The moon was just setting on the horizon about 1 AM and I knew the skies would soon be nice and dark for capturing the gentle glow of the northern lights. This was a 50 sec. exposure with an f /2.8 11 mm wide angle lens on my Nikon D300S using an ISO of 800.


Saturday, April 20, 2013

Adirondack Night Sky: The Lyrid Meteor Shower

Lyrid_meteor_shower_radiant_pointIf you have spent any time on Facebook, or other social media sites, you may have come across an image that states:

“During the night On April 22 2013, people on Earth will have a chance to see one of the rarest meteor shower. During the night you will be able to see thousands of these falling stars until April 23, 2013, these meteors will have best visibility during the night of April 22, 2013. There is a predicted number of about 20 meteors an hour with possible surges of 100 per hour.”

I’m all about spreading the news of meteor showers and getting people to go out and look up. Experiencing a meteor shower is quite enjoyable, and gives your kids a reason to stay up late and see something extraordinary. What I don’t like however, is the false alarm of it being “one of the rarest meteor showers” since it’s an annual occurrence making it not all that rare.

The Venus Transit last June was a rare event with it’s two occurrences in 8 years and then another 105 years until the next one with another 8 year spread before it takes 121 years for the next cycle; that’s a rare event. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, November 29, 2012

Outside Story: The Science of Sunsets

It seems each autumn, I start noticing sunsets more. They are so pink, so orange, so bright. I’ve always chalked up my autumnal sunset attention to my mood shifting with the changing season; perhaps I’m feeling a little wistful at summer’s end and reflecting on nature’s splendor more than usual. But according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the colors we see during sunsets really are more vibrant in fall and winter than they are in spring and summer – seasonal melancholia has got nothing to do with it.

The intensity of sunset and sunrise colors has to do with Rayleigh scattering. I spoke with meteorologist Chris Bouchard of the Fairbanks Museum and Planetarium in St. Johnsbury, Vermont, who kindly dropped some knowledge on this scattering business.
» Continue Reading.


Thursday, October 18, 2012

Adirondack Astronomy: Cassiopeia Constellation

High in the northeastern sky after sunset is the constellation Cassiopeia. On a clear night during the fall and winter you can watch as it makes its way across the sky. Cassiopeia can be seen a few different ways depending on it’s location in the sky; as it rises it can look like the number three, and as it reaches the meridian – straight overhead – it looks like the letter ‘M’, and the letter ‘E’ as it sets to the northwest later in the season.

There are five stars that make up the letters and numbers I mention in the main constellation of Cassiopeia; Segin, Ksora, Cih, Schedir, and Caph. These five stars resemble the chair in which the queen sits in looking out towards the rim of the Milky Way.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, September 9, 2012

Astronomy: The September Night Sky

Here are some objects for the unaided eye for the month of September. All of these objects, although small, should be visible without the help of binoculars or a telescope, so long as you have clear dark skies. If you do have a pair of binoculars, or a small telescope you can enhance many of these views.

Light pollution is a killer for seeing these objects with your unaided eye. To find out how dark your location is, use the Google Map Overlay of light pollution. If you are in a blue, gray or black area then you should have dark enough skies. You may still be able to see some of these objects in a green location. If you aren’t in a dark sky location you may still be able to see these objects with a pair of binoculars or telescope. » Continue Reading.


Monday, August 6, 2012

The Night Sky in August: Featuring A Blue Moon

Here are some objects for the unaided eye for the month of August. All of these objects, although small, should be visible without the help of binoculars or a telescope, so long as you have clear dark skies.

Light pollution is a killer for seeing these objects with your unaided eye. To find out how dark your location is, use the Google Map Overlay of light pollution. If you are in a blue, gray or black area then you should have dark enough skies. You may still be able to see some of these objects in a green location. If you aren’t in a dark sky location you may still be able to see these objects with a pair of binoculars or telescope. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 12, 2012

Adirondack Astronomy: The Night Sky in July

Here are some objects for the unaided eye for the month of July. All of these objects, although small, should be visible without the help of binoculars or a telescope, so long as you have clear dark skies.

Light pollution is a killer for seeing these objects with your unaided eye. To find out how dark your location is, use the Google Map Overlay of light pollution. If you are in a blue, gray or black area then you should have dark enough skies. You may still be able to see some of these objects in a green location. If you aren’t in a dark sky location you may still be able to see these objects with a pair of binoculars or telescope.

You can find help locating the night sky objects listed below by using one of the free sky charts at Skymaps.com (scroll down to Northern Hemisphere Edition and click on the PDF for July 2012). The map shows what is in the sky in July at 10 pm for early July; 9 pm for late July. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 31, 2012

Astronomy: The June Adirondack Night Sky

Here are some objects for the unaided eye for the month of June. All of these objects, although small, should be visible without the help of binoculars or a telescope, so long as you have clear dark skies.

Light pollution is a killer for seeing these objects with your unaided eye. To find out how dark your location is, use the Google Map Overlay of light pollution. If you are in a blue, gray or black area then you should have dark enough skies. Planets and the moon can be seen in red, and orange zones.

You can find help locating the night sky objects listed below by using one of the free sky charts at Skymaps.com (scroll down to Northern Hemisphere Edition and click on the PDF for June 2012). The map shows what is in the sky in June at 10 pm for early June; 9 pm for late June.

If you are not familiar with what you see in the night sky, this is a great opportunity to step outside, look up, and begin learning the constellations. The sky is beautiful and filled with many treasures just waiting for you to discover them. Once you have looked for these objects go through the list again if you have a pair of binoculars handy, the views get better!

» Continue Reading.


Monday, May 21, 2012

Adirondack Astronomy: Transit of Venus Events Planned

Coming up in the month of June is a rare astronomical event. The second planet to the sun, Venus, will pass between us, and the sun. Venus transits have a strange pattern of 121.5, 8, 105.5, 8 years, and the one prior to the transit in June of 2004 was 121.5 years ago in 1882. The next pair of transits wont happen again for another 105.5 years, so this will be the last chance any currently living human get’s to witness this event.

The reason transits don’t happen more frequently is due to the orbits of Venus and Earth not being on the same plane. Venus’ orbit is slightly inclined to the orbit of Earth, so when Venus passes between Earth and the Sun every 1.6 years Venus is either slightly above or below the Sun. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Astronomy: The May Adirondack Night Sky

Here are some objects for the unaided eye for the month of May. All of these objects, although small, should be visible without the help of binoculars or a telescope, so long as you have clear dark skies.

Light pollution is a killer for seeing these objects with your unaided eye. To find out how dark your location is, use the Google Map Overlay of light pollution. If you are in a blue, gray or black area then you should have dark enough skies. You may still be able to see some of these objects in a green location. Snow will add more light pollution due to light reflecting off of it.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Astronomy: The April Adirondack Night Sky

Skymaps.com (scroll down to Northern Hemisphere Edition and click on the PDF for April 2012). The map shows what is in the sky in April at 10 pm for early April; 9 pm for late April.

If you are not familiar with what you see in the night sky, this is a great opportunity to step outside, look up, and begin learning the constellations. The sky is beautiful and filled with many treasures just waiting for you to discover them. Once you have looked for these objects go through the list again if you have a pair of binoculars handy, the views get better! » Continue Reading.



Kid next to water

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