Posts Tagged ‘autumn’

Thursday, November 30, 2023

Poem: Letting Go

Maple tree

 

Letting Go

A hard frost comes: the Solomon’s Seal
is changed from green to straw.
The yellow maple leaves, genteel,
obey November’s law.
Like bats or butterflies they flit,
but always down they come.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, October 5, 2023

Enchanting Autumns in the Adirondacks

As summer’s warmth begins to wane, and the days grow shorter, a remarkable transformation takes place in the heart of the Adirondack Mountains. The mystical season of fall arrives, casting a spell of enchantment over this vast wilderness. In the Adirondacks, autumn is a symphony of color, a time when the forested hillsides burst into brilliant hues, and the landscape undergoes a profound change. Join us as we delve into the magical world of Adirondack autumns, where trees paint the landscape with their vibrant foliage, and wildlife prepares for the harsh winter ahead. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, September 16, 2023

Old Forge Library to host Autumn Equinox celebration, Meet-the-Candidates event

Old Forge, NY- Old Forge Library staff has recently announced that they will host a casual Meet-the-Town of Webb-Candidates event on the evening of Tuesday, September 19 to celebrate National Voter Registration Day, and an Autumn Equinox Celebration which is slated for Thursday, September 21. See below for more details about these events.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Conservation Minute: Wildlife Friendly Yard Clean-up Tips

Chickadee by Marie Read

Your yard is part of the natural landscape and can offer food and cover for insects, mammals, and birds. Leaving the leaves where they fall adds nutrients back to the soil and provides great cover for insects seeking shelter from the cold and snow.

The leaf litter also provides an extra layer of insulation and protection for native, ground and cavity nesting bees and wasps. Some native butterflies and moths have even adapted their chrysalis to mimic the look of dead leaves and seeds. They will overwinter in the leaf litter and hatch in early spring, providing pollination services for early blooming flowers. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, October 12, 2019

A Close Look at Science of Fall Colors

Fall Foliage by Adelaide TyrolWhere I live, autumn typically starts in late August, when pockets of red maples start to turn scarlet around the marshes and lakes. Uh oh. As they say in Westeros, “winter is coming.”

But not before we get to enjoy fall. Yes, a Northeastern autumn is a postcard cliché. Yes, the tour buses and land yachts full of leaf peepers clog the roads. But, really, who can blame them? No matter how many you’ve seen, fall in the Northeast is still one of nature’s most awesome spectacles.

And, so, so ephemeral. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, September 27, 2018

Adirondack Fall Foliage Report – Leaf Peeping Etiquette

Fall Foliage ReportsThe leaves have begun changing and are expected to change dramatically over the next several weeks. Autumn leaf color is already happening at higher elevation areas of the central Adirondacks. Color will broadly widen through the rest of the Adirondack Park in the next few weeks, ending along the Lake George and Lake Champlain valleys.

If driving on busy roads, do not slow down to look at the leaves. This is unsafe for traffic behind you. Find a safe pull over to view the leaves.

If you are headed into the woods or onto the waters, help protect the Adirondacks by learning and practicing the seven Leave No Trace principles.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Gore Mountain Harvest Fest October 6-7

Northwoods Gondola during Harvest Fest 2017Gore Mountain’s 2018 Harvest Fest has been set for October 6-7, and will display an array of premier Adirondack artisans, peak scenic foliage views, autumn-themed food and drink, and a wide variety of recreational activities. There is live music and free admission for all.

Harvest Fest presents an Adirondack slope-side shopping village of 90+ artists featuring: handcrafted items such as furniture made of locally reclaimed wood; NYS wines and spirits; up-cycled book origami; original paintings and photography; all-natural bath and beauty products; Adirondack decor and primitives; hand-painted fabrics, knit scarves and accessories; handmade jewelry and pottery; locally produced specialty foods and more. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Early Fall Leaf Color: The Science

Seems like competitiveness may be part of human DNA. But it does not always pay to be first.

No prize awaits the fastest car that passes a radar patrol, or the first person to come down with the flu at the office. And for trees, the first ones to turn color in autumn are not envied by their peers. If trees experience envy, which no one knows. The first trees to show orange and red and drop their leaves are telling us to get quotes from a tree-removal company, because they are not going to last.

The reason that some trees turn color ahead of their compatriots has to do with their balance sheets. Trees are meticulous accountants, and tend to be good savers that never live beyond their means. When it’s no longer profitable to operate, they start closing down for the season. » Continue Reading.


Friday, September 22, 2017

Fog Descending On Swamp Maples

fog on maplesIn the Northern Forest, the edge of autumn feels like no other time of year. The cool nights and warm afternoons call mid-May to mind, but the dawn woods are quiet and splashed with yellow and red. As the days teeter between summer and fall, I wonder if they belong to either of these seasons or to a season all their own.

Although our four-season calendar makes perfect astronomical sense, its simplicity masks the constant change of the northern year. In a 1991 New York Times essay, W. D. Wetherell offered a more nuanced approach to classifying seasons, describing springtime in the Connecticut River Valley as a progression of four phases: “the start of Red Sox coverage in the newspapers; maple syrup season; the day the ice disappears on the lakes; [and] the smelt run.” But he also acknowledged the competing chronology of cabin fever, mud season, and black fly season. » Continue Reading.


Monday, November 30, 2015

Clarkie: The Life of a Northeastern Black Bear

Black Bear and CubsLast week, a black bear in a blaze orange collar showed up in our yard. Two cubs followed close behind. The sow paused to observe the house, then led her cubs up across our field and down into a small stand of apple trees beside the road. There the family feasted on piles of old apples lying in the grass. They appeared to take a methodical approach, working their way from one tree to the next.

Inside our house, the scene was not nearly as calm. There were rushed attempts at photography, foiled by warped window glass. There was my two-year-old son, precariously balanced on the back of a chair by the window, shrieking “BEAR” and occasionally, “SHOES” – his way of demanding to go outside. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Amy Ivy: The Last of the Fall Chores


unnamedWe had such a long spell of nice weather this fall that I should have no excuse for not having gotten all my fall outdoor chores finished by now. But I suspect I’m not the only one with a few more to-do items on my list. Here are some tips and suggestions:

We are at the very end of the limit for getting spring flowering bulbs planted. Check your sheds and closets for any lingering bulbs that you bought earlier but still haven’t gotten in the ground. I have a little more garlic to plant as well. It’s late, but I’m optimistic the bulbs will have time to root in before winter. Dig up any tender bulbs that can’t survive the winter. This includes gladioulus, canna lilies and dahlias. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, November 2, 2013

Preparing For Winter: Chipmunk Game Theory 101

chipmunkTwo chipmunks vie for seeds on our front lawn. One lives directly underneath the bird feeder. Another hails from the far side of the house, address unknown.

The chipmunks appear identical to me: same size, same stripes. Same interests, namely seed hoarding, aggressive chittering, jumping into the bushes and back out again, and brazen stiff-tailed standoffs with the dog.

However, some aspects of these chipmunks’ behavior are probably distinctive. Experiments have demonstrated that a chipmunks’ choosiness about what food they collect, how fully they stuff their cheek pouches, and even how quickly they stuff food in there all relate to the distance between a foraging site and a home burrow. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, October 27, 2013

Adirondack Amphibians: The Tadpoles of Winter

tadpolesFall is in full swing: foggy mornings, cold rains, and falling leaves. Time to talk about…tadpoles!? That’s right, while we may be accustomed to discussing tadpoles in spring and summer, they’re still around and they’re gearing up for winter.

Imagine your local pond. Under a slate gray autumn sky, the pond is mostly quiet. Only an occasional peep (called the “fall echo”) escapes from the reeds, where previously an amphibian chorus declared its presence. Yet despite the chill and silence, frog life continues. Most of the summer’s broods hopped onto land at least a month ago. Others will hibernate in the coming months as polliwogs.

So how do tadpoles “decide” when to change into frogs? And why do some of them stay in tadpole form all winter? » Continue Reading.


Monday, October 21, 2013

Adirondack Moose and Winter Ticks

Moose Calf Suffering from Tick InfestationLast week, an article appeared in the Science Section of the New York Times exploring the decline in the moose population in many sections of North America. While several potential causes for this widespread die-off were cited, much attention was given to the role of the winter tick in impacting the health and well being of this large, hoofed mammal.

As a rule, ticks are not considered to be a serious problem in the Adirondacks, especially in the more mountainous areas of the Park. However, the thought of a devastating tick infestation developing across our region is unsettling to outdoor enthusiasts that prefer to hike, camp and explore when the weather is cool. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, October 20, 2013

A Mouse In The Outhouse

Fall ColorsWinter is approaching, and rather more quickly than I would really like.  Sure, I’ve got the new stove and a shed chock full of dry hardwood, but I have to admit that I’ve really enjoyed our summer-like fall.  “They” are calling for snow next week, but we’ll see what happens.

I had an inkling that this was coming anyway.  Yes, I know that it’s October and that it’s a reasonable assumption to think that we’ll be getting snow soon.  But last Friday, I got home from work and opened the front door.  I let Pico and the cats out to enjoy the sunshine and warm weather.  But when I went inside the cabin, I found a sight that told me winter was right around the corner. » Continue Reading.



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