Posts Tagged ‘AWI’

Monday, August 9, 2021

Adirondack Watershed Institute releases 2020 stewardship report

 Boat stewards serve on the frontlines to prevent the spread of invasive species in Adirondack waterways. Photo provided by Adirondack Watershed Institute.

Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute (PSC AWI) released its Annual Stewardship Program report for the 2020 boating season. The publication summarizes data on aquatic invasive species (AIS) spread prevention and highlights achievements from the previous summer field season.

The report, which can be found on adkwatershed.org/publications, states that six species of aquatic invasive species were found on boats in the Adirondacks in 2020, none of which were new to the region.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, August 10, 2020

Wiltse joins PSC, AWI staff

Adirondack scientist, photographer, and conservation advocate Brendan Wiltse has joined Paul Smith’s College as Visiting Assistant Professor with its new Masters of Science program and Water Quality Director with the college’s Adirondack Watershed Institute (AWI). Brendan is a graduate of Paul Smith’s College and earned his Ph.D. from Queen’s University in Ontario.

Brendan comes to the college from the Ausable River Association (AsRA) where for 6 years as Science and Stewardship Director he contributed to the group’s efforts to protect the Ausable River watershed through science and community engagement.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, May 22, 2020

Boat inspection program starts up this weekend

Adirondack Watershed Institute steward watches over the Second Pond boat launch near Saranac LakeStarting this Memorial Day Weekend, Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute’s (PSC AWI) Stewardship Program will begin its work at public boat launches throughout the Adirondacks.

In partnership with NYS’s Department of Environmental Conservation, boat stewards will be assisting to CLEAN. DRAIN. DRY boats in the essential work to help protect the state’s waters from aquatic invasive species like hydrilla, water chestnut, and spiny waterflea.

In 2019, stewards talked with more than 250,000 water recreationists about aquatic invasive species and what can be done to prevent their spread. They also kept a lookout for invasive species at the waterbodies where they worked.

» Continue Reading.



Wait, before you go,

sign up for news updates from the Adirondack Almanack!