Posts Tagged ‘beavers’

Saturday, March 30, 2024

Songbirds compete with strutting turkeys at feeders

Falls at Bug Lake

Well, we finally had a week of winter (all at the same time) and even got the snowmobilers out and about until they wore it down to dirt on most of the trails. Many folks to the south of us in the Capital District got ice at the end of the snowstorm, which took down many powerlines, putting many out of power for a couple of days…and some longer. In most places, the temperature got into the single digits and didn’t get above freezing during daylight hours.

Ice was out of many lakes and with these cold temperatures along with the snow that cooled down the surface water temperatures, they all refroze. As of today, March 26, most are still covered with ice and the only open water is in the Moose River and the channel in Inlet where lots of waterfowl moved to find food. I had a Belted Kingfisher over my frozen pond just before the storm, and he wasn’t going to catch any fish there. I did find some Mallards in the beaver ponds on the outlet of Eighth Lake.

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Wednesday, January 3, 2024

Beavers Changed His Life Forever

Paul Schaefer presents the beaver gavel to Governor Mario M. Cuomo

Paul Schaefer once told me that his mentor, “Forever Wild” advocate and organizer John Apperson, would occasionally dress in fur to be more noticeable when, during lobbying of the state legislature, Apperson opposed threats to Lake George, the Forest Preserve and its constitutional protection. Schaefer learned from Apperson how and when to be most noticed and effective.

 

For example, as an elder in the wilderness movement Schaefer once stood up (or down) Governor Mario Cuomo. The governor had just signed the Environmental Protection Fund legislation in the summer of 1993. The setting was Split Rock Farm above Lake Champlain. The dignitaries had all spoken and Cuomo was the last to speak. Completing his speech, Cuomo ( like the rest of us in attendance) was completely taken aback when Paul Schaefer rose and moved to the podium. Cuomo was forced to sit in Schaefer’s now unoccupied chair to listen to what Paul had to say. However congratulatory (of the governor) his remarks, Schaefer had the last word.

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Saturday, November 25, 2023

Grandson Nathan shares tech-savvy skills, glimpsing Beaver Brook bridge project

Sunrise on Old Forge Pond

Winter keeps trying to put a white coat on our landscape, but it melts the next day. The cloud cover made for some nice sunrise and sunset photos. The waxing moon is just a slice of itself which may be hidden in the clouds tonight [Nov. 19]. It was beautiful right out our upstairs windows last night [Nov. 18]. Don Andrews caught one of those nice sunrises over [the] Old Forge Pond one morning. My grandson, Nathan, got a super sunset over Utica the night before. That shot will probably be his screensaver for a while until a better one comes.

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Thursday, October 1, 2020

‘Beaver fever’: French Emigres in Castorland 

Castorland was the location of a courageous but heartbreaking attempt to settle the western edge of the Adirondacks in the late 18th century.

But little would be known of this history if it had not been for William Appleton, Jr. who, in 1862, stumbled across the Journal of Castorland in a Paris bookstand. Castorland…the English translation means ‘Land of the Beaver’… was overseen by Simon Desjardins and Peter Pharoux, who kept a detailed record of the Paris based La Compagnie de New York (Company of New York) from July 1793 until April 1797.

Two years before Appleton discovered the journal, Franklin Hough had published a highly regarded History of Lewis County, New York, in which he dismissed Castorland as ‘unrealistic and overly romantic.’ But Hough, at the time, was unaware of the journal’s existence and had little knowledge of what the New York Company actually experienced. Hough then spent three years translating the document with the intention of revising his History of Lewis County, but he died before that mission was completed.

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