Posts Tagged ‘Birding’

Tuesday, February 27, 2024

Birding & Wellness Webinar with Bridget Butler, Feb. 28

Bridget Butler

In the midst of this unprecedented time, people are in need of daily practices to cope and to maintain their well-being. What would it look like if we used interest in birds to reduce stress and anxiety? Join Bird Diva Bridget Butler for a presentation and discussion exploring how birding can boost well-being and stave off stress and anxiety. All are welcome to join a “Birding and Wellness” Zoom webinar on Wednesday, Feb. 28 at 7 p.m.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, November 5, 2023

Old Forge Library added to Adirondack Land Trust’s Birding For All Program

Bay-Breasted Warbler

Keene, NY — The Adirondack Land Trust welcomes Old Forge Library to Birding for All, a program that donates a backpack, binoculars, and reference materials to a library’s circulating collection to facilitate local bird watching.

“Birding for All offers a chance for people to try birding for themselves and meet our winged friends,” said Old Forge Library Director Linda Weal. “This is a perfect fit with our library’s mission to provide learning opportunities and materials to people who live in Old Forge.”

Each Birding for All backpack contains Vortex Viper HD 8X42 binoculars; Sibley Birds East, a field guide for identifying birds; Adirondack Birding, a guidebook of places to spot birds in the region; materials on how to use and care for binoculars; and a notebook for users to record and share bird sightings and their experiences while using the backpack. Each backpack and its contents exceed $725 in value. The program is designed to expand access to birding by removing cost barriers to participation.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, September 30, 2023

Recording birds in two counties while away for Grandson Jacob’s wedding

Great Granddaughter Milly picking roses

Fall weather has finally hit here in the North Country, with the first frost on Thursday, [September] 21, but it was light enough that my wide leaf plants didn’t get hit. My bed of nasturtiums, which have very big leaves and hundreds of flowers, wasn’t touched. Not too many bees (or other bugs) doing any pollinating this time of the year to make seeds for next year. I did see my last hummingbird on Friday morning [September 22] which gave us a new record for Eight Acre Wood by seven days longer than ever before. We were down Rochester way [on] Saturday and Sunday, [September 23 and 24,] so that record will have to stand for now. Maybe they have adapted to global warming faster than we know, staying this late.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, March 31, 2023

Adirondack Interpretive Center announces roundup of Spring events

AIC spring 2023 events.

Newcomb, NY – The Adirondack Interpretive Center (AIC) has recently announced a lineup of events to kick off the Spring season including a series of free “mud season movies,” early migrant bird walks, and a one-day introduction to fly fishing workshop. The 2023 mud season movies will be shown every Saturday in April at 1:30 p.m. at the Adirondack Interpretive Center, Newcomb Campus. (More information on the mud season movies in the image above.) The film series is sponsored by the Adirondack Park Institute.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, January 25, 2023

Be a ‘Snow Birder’ This Winter

Barred owl

While the chilliest months of the year may seem like the hardest time to venture outdoors, it can be a great time to go birding. Layer up and head out to your backyard, local park, or other public space and observe some of the bird species that you may not normally see during warmer months. Winter raptors (PDF)—including snowy owls (PDF)short-eared owls, barn owls, and hawks—migrate south from the Canadian tundra and can be observed near open bodies of water and large grasslands. Some species of woodpeckers may be easier to hear or see in their winter homes. Black-capped chickadees remain in northern climates due to their ability to survive the ultra-cold weather. Winter is also the best time to observe bald eagles!

Use a website like eBird to see what species have been detected near you. The free Merlin Bird ID app can help you identify unfamiliar birds and add even more new species to your lists.
If you do brave the cold and snow, properly preparing for winter conditions is essential for a more enjoyable and safe experience. Check out our YouTube video on layering for winter, and read up on some of our winter hiking safety tips that can be used for any outdoor trip.

Check out the New York State Birding Trail to find locations across the state to go birding.

Photo of barred owl by Fred McCagg. Photo courtesy of the NYS DEC.


Sunday, September 18, 2022

DEC: Fall bird migration underway, all regions of NYS Birding Trail completed

Fall Bird Migration is Underway:

Fall migration is an exciting time for birding. With migrants on the move your favorite birding site can change within a few days, with different species traveling in and out. Every spring and fall, thousands of raptors migrate, and birders may see or hear eagles, kestrels, Sharp-shinned Hawks, Ospreys, Broad-winged Hawks, and Peregrine Falcons among others. The NYS Birding Trail highlights several hawk watches including Bear Mountain Hawk Watch at Bear Mountain State Park, Hook Mountain Hawk Watch, and Mount Peter Hawkwatch Trailway, all within the Hudson Valley segment.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, September 3, 2022

Final Three Segments of NYS Birding Trail Completed

On August 25, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos announced the grand opening of the final three regions of the New York State Birding Trail, highlighting the state’s world-class and wide-ranging birding opportunities. The Adirondacks-North Country, Catskills, and Southern Tier segments bring the total number of birding trail locations across the state to more than 300, providing a variety of quality birding experiences for New Yorkers and visitors to enjoy.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 21, 2022

DEC announces 2022 ‘I BIRD NY’ challenges

Birder at Washington County Grasslands provided by DECOn June 17, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos announced the start of the 2022 “I BIRD NY” challenges for beginning and experienced birders. Two levels of challenges provide the opportunity to identify birds and learn about birdlife and offer a chance to win birding equipment. With the launch of many New York State Birding Trail segments this year, DEC will be increasing the chances of winning if participants find birds on a New York State Birding trail site.

“No matter where you live, birdwatching is a fun, easy, affordable activity that can be enjoyed by people of all ages, abilities, identities, and backgrounds,” said Commissioner Seggos. “This summer is a great time to start birding or take your birding skills to the next level by observing birds in the diverse variety of habitats and locations the New York State Birding Trail offers.”

New York State’s wide-ranging habitat types, from the Atlantic Ocean’s sandy beaches to majestic Catskill and Adirondack peaks, Great Lakes shorelines, and everything in between create a birder’s paradise that supports more than 450 different bird species throughout the year. New York offers a wide variety of options in Birding Trail locations with ongoing new sites being added, making it even easier for New Yorkers to get started with this fun activity.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, May 15, 2022

Ausable River Association announces Spring series of free guided watershed tours

The Ausable River Association (AsRA) has announced the schedule for their free, guided interpretive outdoor programs in the northern Adirondacks this spring.
“We are excited to grow our popular guided watershed tours this year,” said Kelley Tucker, AsRA’s Executive Director. “We’re offering guided tours in all seasons this year, and our spring tours will focus on native wildflowers, birds, bats, and other Adirondack species.”
“This year’s programs include 15 guided trips to locations in the Ausable, Boquet, and Saranac River watersheds,” said Tyler Merriam, Donor Outreach Manager.
Three spring programs kick off the season. The first is a birding walk in a private preserve along the West Branch Ausable River. Dr. Larry Master, conservation biologist/zoologist and past Ausable River Association board chair, and Derek Rogers, ace birder and Stewardship Director with the Adirondack Land Trust, will lead this tour.

Saturday, April 23, 2022

Bird watching with old and new friends on Sanibel Island

It sounds like the Catskills and Adirondacks are going to again be blanketed with six to twelve inches of wet snow which might take down some trees that have started to bud out. This won’t be good for the birds that have already moved north. Many are being hit with the bird flu and those that have died (or are dying) will be eaten by predatory hawks and owls which will in turn catch the flu and also die…not a good deal in the bird world.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 19, 2022

Watchable Wildlife – From Backyard Birding to the NYS Birding Trail

birds at feeder

Soon it will be time to put the bird feeders away as spring is approaching. But fortunately, birding and watching wildlife are year-round activities. Whether you are birding in your backyard or visiting a location on the New York State Birding Trail – here are some tips to help you get the most out of watching and enjoying birds:

» Continue Reading.


Monday, February 14, 2022

Be a ‘Snow Birder’ This Winter

grosbeaks

While the chilliest months of the year may seem like the hardest time to venture outdoors, it can be a great time to go birding. Layer up and head out to your backyard, local park, or other public space and observe some of the bird species that you may not normally see during warmer months. Winter raptors (PDF) including snowy owls (PDF)short-eared owls, barn owls, and hawks migrate south from the Canadian tundra and can be observed near open bodies of water and large grasslands. Some species of woodpeckers may be easier to hear or see in their winter homes. Black-capped chickadees remain in Northern climates due to their ability to survive the ultra-cold weather. Winter is also the best time to observe bald eagles!

Use a website like eBird to see what species have been detected near you. The free Merlin Bird ID app can help you identify unfamiliar birds and add even more new species to your lists.

If you do brave the cold and snow, properly preparing for winter conditions is essential for a more enjoyable and safe experience. Check out our latest YouTube video on layering for winter, and read up on some of our winter hiking safety tips that can be for any outdoor trip.

Stay tuned for future announcements on the New York State Birding Trail to find locations across the state to go birding.

Photo of grosbeaks by Randy Fredlund.


Tuesday, January 25, 2022

Winter Birding Weekend in Long Lake

Red Crossbill bird, part of winter birding weekend Enjoy a weekend of birding events this Saturday and Sunday, Jan. 29-30 in Long Lake.  Participants will look for winter irruptive species – Red Crossbills have already irrupted – along with Winter Finches, White-winged Crossbills, Pine Siskins, Purple Finches, and American Goldfinches. These species have been found gritting (eating sand and salt off the road to help with seed digestion), and foraging on cones.

Trip Leader and Birding expert, Joan Collins, will lead field trips on both days.  Both Saturday and Sunday morning, participants will meet outside the Adirondack Hotel at 1245 Main St., Long Lake at 7 a.m. Located near the bridge over Long Lake on Route 30. Participants must take their own vehicles for this event.

Trip Leader Joan Collins, President of Adirondack Avian Expeditions & Workshops, LLC, leads birding trips year-round, is a New York State licensed guide, an Adirondack 46er, and has climbed all the Adirondack fire tower peaks. She is a past President of the New York State Ornithological Association and current Editor of New York Birders. She is a past Board of Directors member of the Audubon Council of New York State, and past President of Northern New York Audubon Society. Joan has published several journal, magazine, and newspaper articles on wildlife and conservation topics in various publications. She authored several warbler species accounts, in addition to serving as a peer reviewer for The Second Atlas of Breeding Birds in New York State. Joan is a frequent keynote speaker and teaches classes on ornithology topics.

Registration is required to attend the field trips and the field trips are free.  Call the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department at 518-624-3077 to pre-register.  There is a maximum of 25 participants for each field trip.

The Winter Birding Weekend is sponsored by the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department. For more info visit mylonglake.com

 


Monday, September 27, 2021

Birdwatching in the Adirondacks

Birder at Washington County Grasslands provided by DEC

By Hicham Aboutaam

Anyone who is a bird lover and an avid birdwatcher undoubtedly already has the Adirondacks on their bucket list. There are over 100 species of birds in the Adirondacks and the chance to enjoy everything from boreal birds and birds of prey to perching birds and waterfowl. The area is a feast for the eyes and the other senses. For the uninitiated, or the person who has not yet had the chance to enjoy birdwatching in the area, here is a quick guide to experiences I have had and advice I’ve garnered over time.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, June 15, 2020

Breeding Bird Atlas Update

Do you birdwatch in Upstate New York? If so then you can contribute to the Breeding Bird Atlas, (the BBA).

On its third iteration, the purpose of the BBA is to observe breeding birds of New York State from 2020-2024 in order to observe comparisons between the past and future NY BBAs to see how locations and population sizes change over time. The data collected is important for conservation programs for birds and their habitats. Everyone is encouraged to participate from 2020-2024, amateur and advanced birdwatchers alike can contribute as little or as much as they want.

Learn more about the BBA to get started.


Photo Credit: Beth Cooper



Wait! Before you go:

Catch up on all your Adirondack
news, delivered weekly to your inbox