Posts Tagged ‘Black Bears’

Saturday, April 6, 2024

Urging eclipse travelers to respect the Park, refrain from littering

Jake turkeys strutting

Well, the eclipse is coming Monday, April 8, but don’t put all your eggs in one basket as it may be cloudy or even raining…hate to dampen your parade, but it could happen. Looking at the weather prediction for that day, it looks good on the computer, but you never know. The area that I pick up litter along the highway has been mostly clear of snow for a couple weeks now, but I’m going to wait until after all these eclipse travelers are gone and only hope they take their litter with them.

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Thursday, December 28, 2023

From the Archives: Animals in Winter

Black bear mother and cub hibernating - University of Minnesota
The past few days have been a strange start to our Adirondack winter, with warm temperatures in the 40s and a drizzly rain.
But, don’t be deceived… winter is officially here! So, what happens to the wildlife in the ADKs when the temperatures drop and the snow starts to fall?

Check out some of these great articles from the Adirondack Almanack archives:

 

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Saturday, July 8, 2023

Wildlife sightings out west: Bears, bison, coyotes, mountain goats, moose, deer and elk

 

Coyote

Arrived back in the Adirondacks today [Monday, July 3] after two days of being driven from West Yellowstone to Webster (and another four hours to get home from there today.) Made a stop at the Remsen bog on the way here and some of the showy lady’s slippers were still out. [I] also stopped to check on some of my Loons along the way. Some were still sitting, and others had hatched their chicks and were on the water with their young. So, if you are out and about on the water and see a family of Loons, give them some space and take pictures with a long lens.

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Monday, April 10, 2023

DEC Issues Guidance to Reduce Conflicts with Black Bears

Bear at a feeder in Marathon Ontario - Cornell Lab of OrnithologyOn April 7, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) reminded New Yorkers to remove or secure outdoor food sources that may attract black bears.

New Yorkers who feed birds in areas with bears (which includes most of upstate New York), should begin emptying and cleaning up spilt seed from feeders, and let nature feed the birds from spring through fall. The public is also advised to secure garbage cans in a sturdy building, clean or remove all residual grease and food from grills, and store pet and livestock food indoors. New Yorkers should also consider installing electric fences around chicken coops or apiaries to protect flocks and hives.

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Wednesday, March 29, 2023

Bears

bear cubs

Diminution: I – BEARS, rev.

Author’s note: Spring is almost upon us and the bears will be coming out and eventually down to our villages and towns; will eventually have unhappy altercations with homeowners as food becomes scarce and they get hungrier. They will also get shot and killed — 16 last year alone by the DEC.

This poem is both a memorial to what occurred and an admonition about what is sure to occur again. The question it leaves unanswered — are we willing to do anything to prevent or mitigate that occurrence? 

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Friday, December 30, 2022

Sleeping the Winter Away? 

North County winters pose a challenge to animals who choose to stay here, rather than migrate to warmer climates. Food is scarce. Many survive by sleeping. Well… not sleeping exactly. Hibernating.

Hibernation is a life-saving adaptation. Essentially, it’s the ability to reduce one’s energy needs when resources run low or become unavailable. Many warm-blooded animals would die of starvation if it wasn’t for their ability to hibernate.

Very Few Animals are ‘True’ Hibernators 

    The term hibernation is commonly applied to all types of winter dormancy. But ‘true’ hibernators enter hibernation at the same time every year, regardless of the outside temperature or availability of food. During ‘true’ hibernation, body temperature is lowered to slightly above that of the temperature in the animal’s lair. Respiration is reduced to just a few breaths per minute. Heartbeat becomes barely distinguishable.

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Monday, October 31, 2022

Winter is Coming: What are Bears Up To?

Black bear

Late in the fall months, black bears are in the final stretch of hyperphagia (excessive eating) to ensure they have enough fat stored for the fast-approaching winter months. Some bears will search for food up to 20 hours a day! In years where food sources are less abundant, bears have been known to den-up as early as late October. During especially mild winters, bears may not formally den and will remain active throughout the winter if food sources like acorns or beechnuts are available. Typically bears will begin denning starting in November and through December.

Bear dens can be as simple as a depression on the forest floor, but typically are small cavities in trees or under brush piles. In New York, bears have been known to den under residential porches or other outbuildings. Den sites are typically dry and afford protection from the elements during the long winter season.

Photo at top by Pete Patrick. Photo provided by the DEC.


Sunday, May 16, 2021

The Bear Dance: A Three Part Camp Adventure

American black bearPart I :  Bear Essentials

Wednesday, July 11, 2018, 3:30 pm-  My cell phone rang.   It was my brother Ray, calling from the lean to on Bull Rush Bay.

“Hey- I’m in camp for the day.   Pepper’s with me. Two food bins are missing from the lean to and  the Yeti is tipped over.”

We ran down the list of potential culprits- vandals, raccoons, bears.  Missing food bins didn’t fit any known raccoon MO. It would have taken Racczilla to tip over that Yeti.  Scratch raccoons.  That left two suspects- vandals, or bears.

I said “Vandals would have stolen the Yeti, and the beer.  Bears leave drag marks.  Be careful, especially with that pup!  Keep your eyes peeled for drag marks. Call me back.”

3:42 pm.  My phone rang again.

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Tuesday, March 23, 2021

Pack up that birdseed, as bears are coming out of hibernation


black bearPublic Encouraged to Remove Birdfeeders, Feed Pets Indoors
The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) reminds New Yorkers to avoid conflicts with bears by taking down bird feeders and securing garbage.

DEC has already received a few reports of bear sightings across the state. As bears emerge from their dens, they use their sensitive noses to find food. Human-related food sources such as bird feeders, pet food, and garbage can attract bears and lead to potential conflicts. Feeding bears either intentionally, which is illegal, or unintentionally through careless property management, has consequences for entire communities, as well as the bears themselves.

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Saturday, September 5, 2020

Weekend read: black bears

black bearBear stories. We all have them and often enjoy telling them.

This week, there was plenty of bear activity in the news. Take the viral video from Indian Lake. And we posted a story by Tim Rowland about a search party in Old Forge that was launched to locate a missing teen. When she was found right away, she told the rescue team that she encountered an angry mama bear and cubs while jogging and in her efforts to put some distance between them, the teen ran up a tree and spent the night in the tree.

Which prompted some questions, including “What’s the best way to handle bear encounters?” You can read that one and weigh in here.  Tell us your best bear story, too, in the comments here or email me at editor@adirondackalmanack.com.

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Tuesday, September 1, 2020

Scare from a bear: When does a charge becomes a chase?

Missing Old Forge teen claims she was chased by bear, spent night in tree

The weighty canon of Adirondack bear lore grew a little thicker recently, when an Old Forge athlete put her running shoes to good use to scamper out of the path of a momma bear intent on protecting her cubs.

According to the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, a 19-year-old woman later identified by state police as Rachel Smith, set out on a five-mile run on Big Otter Trail in the HaDaRonDah Wilderness Area on the evening of Aug. 18 and did not return.

What happened next is sure to be retold many times in a region that values its bear culture — from the famed Bear Fight Up in Keene to the hiker whose camp was ripped apart because his lunch included a salmon sandwich.

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Tuesday, July 14, 2020

The cycle of killing habituated bears continues

black bearSeveral campsites and lean-tos were temporarily closed in the High Peaks Wilderness on July 5 due to an aggressive black bear that had been roaming the area looking for human food.

A day later the state Department of Environmental Conservation captured and later killed the animal.

As DEC officials have often said to me in these situations, “A fed bear is a dead bear.”

What does that mean? It means if a bear gets food from humans too many times, it will get habituated to the food. The bear will then continue to seek out food from campers, especially when natural food sources aren’t available such as during dry years. In some cases, the bear will then get too close to people and be considered dangerous. In these situations, bears don’t win. Instead, they are killed.

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Friday, June 19, 2020

DEC Issues Guidance to Reduce Bear Conflicts

In June, black bear movement increases as the breeding season begins and yearling (one-year-old) bears disperse to find their own space. Inevitably some of these bears, particularly yearlings, wander through places these animals would not normally inhabit, like suburban or urban neighborhoods.

Bears have an acute sense of smell and may attempt to consume anything they perceive as edible, including improperly stored garbage, birdseed, livestock, pet food, and barbecue grill grease traps. Once a bear has discovered a food source, it may return or seek similar foods at neighboring properties, learning bad behavior that can damage human property and may lead to the death of the bear.

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Sunday, March 22, 2020

Preparing for Black Bears in Spring

black bearIt’s not too early for New York homeowners to think about bear-proofing their properties. While most of our bears are still in their dens, the mild winter weather has allowed some of them to stay on foot searching for food. » Continue Reading.


Monday, February 17, 2020

DEC Announces 2019 Bear Hunting Stats

black bearNew York State bear hunters took 1,505 black bears during the 2019 hunting seasons, the state’s Department of Environmental Conservation is reporting.

Hunters took a record 1,179 bears in the Southern Zone, while hunters in the Northern Zone took only 326 bears, the fewest since 2011.

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