Posts Tagged ‘Black Bears’

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

Early Bear Hunting Seasons Opening

black bearBlack bear hunting seasons open this weekend in the southeastern part of the state and next weekend in the North Country.

In northern New York, the early bear season runs from Sept. 14 to Oct. 18 in WMUs 5A, 5C, 5F, 5G, 5H, 5J, 6C, 6F, 6H, and 6J. Bowhunting season for bears also begins on Sept. 14, in the other Northern Zone units (WMUs 6A, 6G, 6K, and 6N). Muzzleloader season then opens in all northern WMUs on Oct. 19, followed by the regular firearms season for bears on Oct. 26.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 8, 2019

Injured Bear Cub Rescued Along Route 3

tranquilized bear cub courtesy DECAccording to a press release issued by DEC, on July 28th, a motorist called DEC to report that he had struck a bear cub on Route 3 in the town of Franklin.

ECO James Cranker reported that he responded and located the cub in a tree alongside the busy highway. The cub seemed dazed and was favoring an injured front leg. ECO Cranker said he followed the bear a short distance into the woods, while being alert for the presence of an adult bear in the vicinity. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 1, 2019

Viewpoint: Respect Adirondack Wildlife

2013 at Limekiln Lake paddlers disturb nesting loonsI have been fortunate to see a moose on four different occasions since I’ve moved to the Adirondacks. I’ve only seen one bald eagle. My family jokes that I’m a bald eagle repellent as they seem to see bald eagles as frequently as I see squirrels.  That said, if my children tell me there is a bald eagle over the nearby river, if possible, I am in my car hoping to catch a glimpse. I’m in awe of the wildlife experiences I have and am grateful for each one.

I bring my camera everywhere and certainly appreciate anyone else who wants to witness one of the many wonderful wildlife residents of the Adirondack Park. I don’t appreciate when people start treating Adirondack wildlife as if they were zoo animals. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, July 13, 2019

Tips For Keeping Bears Out Of Your Stuff

black bearNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has issued guidance to reduce the potential for human-bear conflicts.

Conflicts between people and bears typically increase in summer months due to the dispersal of young bears from family groups, the onset of the breeding season, and a lull in natural food availability prior to the ripening of local berries and other natural food sources.

These conditions occasionally cause bears to travel through unfamiliar areas. Bears will take advantage of anything they consider a food source as they travel, adding to the potential for conflict. The most common attractants are poorly stored garbage, bird feeders, messy grills, and pet food left outdoors. Once a bear finds these foods, it will often continue to return to the area in hopes of finding the same food again. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Remove Bird Feeders, Don’t Attract Bears

black bear The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has reminded New Yorkers to take steps to prevent bears from easily accessing food sources like bird feeders and garbage.

Due to poor natural food availability last fall, many black bears went into their dens with low fat reserves. As they begin to emerge from winter dens, they have already begun seeking out food sources around homes. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, October 4, 2018

Bear Poaching Case In Clinton County

According to a press release issued by the Department of Environmental Conservation, on September 24, DEC’s Dispatch Center received a tip from a concerned citizen regarding an individual that had shot multiple bears during the early bear hunting season.

The caller reported that a sow and her two cubs were killed on September 22nd. The case was assigned to ECO Chris Lagree, who reported that the bears were taken illegally less than a mile from his own residence. ECO Lagree interviewed the suspect at his home in Plattsburgh, at which time Lagree says the suspect admitted to taking the sow and cubs in addition to another bear, and to having shot the bears over a bait pile. » Continue Reading.


Friday, September 7, 2018

Lake George Bear Activity Prompts DEC Enforcement Warning

black bearWhat follows is a notice from the NYSDEC:

Due to number of residents still feeding birds and failing to secure their garbage, and the amount of nuisance bear activity in the Town of Lake George, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is shifting from an educational mode to an enforcement mode.

Residences with bird feeders and other bear attractants will be given a written warning. If they fail to heed the warning they will be issued a ticket that could result in a maximum penalty of $250 fine and 15 days in jail. » Continue Reading.


Friday, June 29, 2018

Nuisance Bear: Avoid Slant Rock Area

Slant Rock Lean-to Map Eastern High Peaks Wilderness Adirondacks With AlertHikers should avoid camping at Slant Rock Lean-to area in the High Peaks this weekend and beware of a nuisance bear with an ear tag that has been active in Eastern High Peaks Wilderness recently.

The bear is approaching hikers and campers in an attempt to obtain food. The bear has been seen in the Slant Rock area, which is located along the popular Phelps Trail in the Johns Brook Valley. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 10, 2018

iSeeMammals: Black Bear Citizen Science

Bear at a feeder in Marathon Ontario - Cornell Lab of OrnithologyAs I write this at my home, there’s snow on the ground. But spring is almost here. In fact, as I opened the door to leave my house this morning, I was greeted by a sure sign of spring; the patently pungent smell of skunk! And I couldn’t help but wonder if the little stinker, indeed, missed or misted its adversary.

It never ceases to amaze me how animals can spend the winter months in hibernation (deep sleep) or torpor (a state of decreased physiological activity during periods of extreme cold; light hibernation) in order to survive months of harsh weather and scarcity of food. They’re waking up now, and coming out of their dens and lairs looking for (in the case of skunks, mates and) something to eat. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 10, 2018

DEC Announces 2017 Bear Hunting Results

black bearNew York State bear hunters killed 1,420 black bears during the 2017 hunting seasons according to statistics compiled by the State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).

Hunters took an estimated 1,037 black bears in New York’s Southern Zone, nearly the same number as in 2016, but slightly more than the recent five-year average. Bowhunters took 330 bears, on par with the recent average, but less than the 537 bears taken during the regular season. The early season, which DEC initiated in 2014 to reduce bear populations in a handful of management units in the Catskill region, resulted in 150 bears. » Continue Reading.


Monday, December 11, 2017

Early Adirondack Hunting: More Deer, Less Bear Killed So Far

Hunters have been more successful at killing deer around New York State, but less successful at hunting bear in the Northern Region through the first several weeks of big game seasons in 2017 than last year, according to Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).

DEC says that early reports from New York hunters through Dec. 3, show approximately 18 percent more deer were killed in the Northern Zone and 14 percent more deer in the Southern Zone compared to the same period in 2016.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, October 20, 2017

Bear Denning: Bears Are Making Their Beds

bear den The fields around our home are something of a bear buffet from mid-summer through fall: wild blueberries in July followed by blackberries, then apples come September, with beechnuts falling from the trees skirting the mown area. In our 13 years here, we’ve seen a mother bear noshing on fallen apples while her cubs scampered around in the tree above her, heard bears climbing and snapping the occasional apple branch while we lay in tents 20 yards away during a backyard campout, and even witnessed two cubs playing in our kids’ sandbox.

I’ve often wondered where the neighborhood bruins – otherwise known as American black bears (Ursus americanus) – den up for the winter. How do they decide where – and when – to hunker down for the cold season? » Continue Reading.


Thursday, September 7, 2017

Early Adirondack Bear Hunting Seasons Start Soon

black bearEarly bear hunting seasons are about to begin across New York State. Hunting is generally permitted on Forest Preserve land in the Adirondack Park. Hunting accidents are rare, but hikers should wear bright colors and keep pets leashed as a precaution.

During the Early Bear Season, hunters may use a bow (with appropriate bowhunting eligibility), crossbow, muzzleloader, handgun, shotgun, or rifle (where allowed).  Because of the likelihood of warm weather, DEC is telling hunters they should be prepared to skin and cool dead bears as soon as possible to protect the quality of the meat. DEC suggests hunters skin and quarter the bear in the field, then pack out the meat in game bags to a waiting cooler of ice. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 27, 2017

High Bear Activity In Dix Mountain Wilderness

black bearDEC has warned campers and hikers that black bears have been active stealing food from campers, hikers, and rock climbers in two locations in the Dix Mountain Wilderness.

Campers and hikers are encouraged to keep all food, toiletries, and garbage in a bear resistant canister to avoid attracting black bears.

Campers are also advised to avoid cooking and eating after dark. Prepare and eat food away from the tent site.

If approached by a bear, do not give it food. Make noise and try to scare it away. Call the DEC Regional Wildlife Office at (518) 897-1291 to report encounters with bears. » Continue Reading.


Friday, June 2, 2017

Black Bear Count Needs Citizen Scientists

American black bearHere’s an opportunity to be a scientific researcher, even if you have an English degree. New York Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Unit at Cornell University and the Department of Environmental Conservation are launching a project that enlists citizen scientists to collect data about black bears.

Using the iSeeMammals app, which you can download here, participants go on hikes and record signs of bears through photos, by setting up a fixed camera and recording information. You can create an account online or on your Apple or Android phone. » Continue Reading.