Posts Tagged ‘Blue Mountain Lake’

Monday, September 21, 2009

Harvest Festival at The Adirondack Museum

The Adirondack Museum will hold its annual Harvest Festival next Saturday and Sunday, October 3rd and 4th, from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. The Museum offers free admission to year-round residents of the Adirondack Park in the month of October including the Harvest Festival.

As a part of festival the Museum is sponsoring a food drive in support of Warren-Hamilton Community Action. Donations of non-perishable food items will be collected in the lobby of Visitor Center from September 29 through October 6.

Circle B Ranch in Chestertown will be providing rustic wagon hay rides through around the museum grounds as wel as pony rides.

Traditional folk music eill be provided by Roy Hurd and Frank Orsini both days at 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.

Other Harvest Festival highlights include cider pressing, a blacksmithing demonstration, barn raising (for young and old), as well as pumpkin painting
and crafts inspired by nature. Regional artists and crafters will offer unique handmade items for sale. Kids can enjoy a variety of harvest-themed games and activities.

For more information call (518) 352-7311, or visit
www.adirondackmuseum.org.


Monday, September 7, 2009

Antiques Show and Sale at the Adirondack Museum

The Adirondack Museum will play host to its annual Antiques Show and Sale on September 19 and 20, 2009. The event features forty-six antiques dealers offering examples of vintage furnishings and collectibles, including regional roadside advertising and painted American country furniture – also known as “rustic country.” A a complete listing of the antiques dealers who will exhibit at the show and sale can be found at the “Exhibits & Events” section of the Adirondack Museum’s web site at www.adirondackmuseum.org. In preparation for the show, the museum will be closed to the public on September 18, 2009. The museum will be open from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. each day and visitors can take in the Antiques Show and Sale for the cost of regular general admission to the museum grounds.

The weekend will begin with an Antique Show Preview Benefit on September 18, 2009 from 2:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m.; hors d’oeuvres and beverages will be served. Preview
Benefit tickets are $100 and include admission to the Antiques Show and Sale
on Saturday and Sunday. The admission price supports the museum’s exhibitions and programs. To reserve preview tickets, call (518) 352-7311, ext. 119.


Saturday, August 8, 2009

Adirondack Arts Center to Sponsor LGBT Event

The Adirondack Lakes Center for the Arts–The Arts Center in Blue Mountain Lake is hosting Out in the Adirondacks at Great Camp Sagamore, August 21st – 23rd. According to the Arts Center this will be the first event of its kind–a destination weekend in the beautiful Adirondack Mountains for the “out” population and their supporters that celebrates the diversity of the human experience.

The weekend includes a concert by singer/songwriter Catie Curtis, a one-man comedic show by actor/comedian Steve Hayes, an old-fashioned square dance, open mic, and more. The family-friendly lodging, food, and entertainment package will cost $249. According to their website, the Arts Center is revitalizing its mission established over forty-two years. The Center was the first community arts center in the Adirondack Park.


Thursday, August 6, 2009

Adirondack Music Scene:Rock and Roll, Classical, Celtic, and Folk

It’s incredible, wherever you go during the summer music fills the air. Like today, if you were lucky enough to get to the Saranac Lake Block Party early you’d have heard a number of live acts in Berkley Square. Last night at the Shamrock out in Gabriels there was a wonderful jam with contributions from three musicians who are normally too busy to make it out to a jam like that. We regulars were treated to beautiful harmonies and some of the best fiddle playing I’ve heard all year. For this non-scheduled stuff all you can do is show up and be happily surprised. However, this week there are some scheduled shows worth putting in your planners.

Starting tonight on the Waterhole patio in Saranac Lake at 6 p.m. the band Ironwood will be playing. I found myself singing along to a few of their songs after just one listen. Bouncy perfect patio rock and roll.

Possible new hot spot every Friday in North Creek: Cafe Sarah is encouraging musicians to show up starting around 5:30 until 9 pm. There is no formal set-up just now but it may evolve into a regular open mic. Thus far a few different musicians have shown up and had an impromptu jam. So, get the word out. You can call (518) 251-5959 for more details if their website is down.

Friday, as usual there is almost too much going on. First at the Waterhole starting at 6 pm there will be some version of The Dust Bunnies opening for Rich Merritt and Matt Russell who used to play in my living room 20 years ago! These guys are excellent musicians and fun entertainers.

Also on Friday starting at 7 pm in Blue Mountain Lake, the Lake Placid Sinfonietta will be performing “Rhapsodies in Blue” at the Adirondack Museum. The grounds open at 5:15 pm so guests can picnic. Bring blankets, lawn chairs, and food (beer and wine will be available for sale) to enjoy this gorgeous setting before the evening of Strauss, Bach, Grieg and Beethoven, just to name a few, begins. They do have an alternate venue in case it rains. There is a $20 general admission charge and, if you’re really into it, a pre-concert reception with the conductor for $75.

Also in Saranac Lake at O’Reilly’s Pub located below Morgan’s 11 on Main St. a group of very talented musicians will be performing at 8 pm. They are calling themselves “Lap The Dasher” and I have no doubt they will be gathering fans of Irish music for a long time to come.

Saturday JEMS Day on the Village Green in Jay: There will be performers all day starting at 10 am and then to cap it all off Sven Curth will be performing his fantastic combination of funkabilly and blues starting at 6:30 pm.

Saturday one of the best singers around, Martin Sexton, is giving a solo performance at LPCA in Lake PLacid at 8 pm. I’ve had the pleasure of seeing Mr. Sexton a few times now and I am thoroughly amazed by his voice. He’s been very generous with his time to help out great venues such as The Wild Center in Tupper Lake and BluSeed Studios in Saranac Lake. Now he’s giving a full concert and I truly hope the community goes out to support his talent. Tickets are $23 in advance and $25 on the day of the show.

Also on Saturday in Saranac Lake Lucid is playing at the Waterhole. They are supposed to start around 9:30 pm. What I’ve been hearing online sounds like great rock/blues with the sax and keys giving them a funk/jazzy sound as well. If you miss them on Saturday you can catch them at the Essex County Fairgrounds in Westport on Wednesday the 12th.

On Sunday in Schroon Lake The Adirondack Folk Festival starts at noon and goes until 5 pm. Many excellent folk musicians are participating this year — people like Roy Hurd, Sara Milonovich, Joan Crane, Jamcrackers, Frank Orsini, John Kirk, Trish Miller and Ed Lowman.

Tuesday the 11th in Lake Placid, Porter Batiste Stoltz will be performing at Mid’s Park on Main Street. This band is from New Orleans and tours nationally. This is part of The Pines Inn – Songs At Mirror Lake and it’s free!

Drawing of the band Lucid at Mezzanotte in Syracuse. Wish I could tell you who the artist is but… well, looks like Lou something to me – if you know please drop me a line. Thanks!


Thursday, July 30, 2009

ADK Music Scene: Classical, Country, Blues and Reggae

Tonight at St. Bernards Church in Saranac Lake the Elegua Duo performs from 8 – 9:30 pm. Classical musicians, Claire Black and Ginevra Ventre, pianist and cellist respectively, will be recording for NCPR. Some of the composers they embrace are Beethoven, Chopin and Britten. They will then be in Westport on Friday from 7:30 – 9 pm for the Essex Community Concert Series and Blue Mountain Lake for an interactive children’s workshop. The workshop will be held at The Adirondack Center for The Arts from 3:30 – 5 pm.

Also tonight in Saranac Lake at 6:30 pm, pianist and accordionist Radoslav Lorkovic is going to be in Berkley Square. He is so accomplished – throwing different styles of music into his original compositions; classical, blues, swing and zydeco to name a few. I’m excited that he’s in town and changed my plans to be at his concert.

Tonight in Westport at Ballard Park, Meadowmount Classical presents an evening of Chamber music at 7 pm. As a child my folks used to take me to Meadowmount concerts and despite being antsy on occasion, I loved going. They gave me a deep appreciation and understanding of classical music even though I haven’t studied it formally. I also think those concerts helped teach patience and respect for the silent moments in music and therefore in life.

Tonight, last but not least, at the Elizabethtown gazebo; Larry Stone, Julie Robards and Max Van Wie will be playing at 7 pm. Julie is a great bluegrass musician, you can catch her with the band Stacked Deck (which Larry is also part of) and Larry plays some great blues/swing/country with his band Stoneman Blues Band. They’re so talented individually that as a duo they must put on a good show. If you miss them tonight, catch them tomorrow from 7 – 9 pm at the Deers Head Inn also in Elizabethtown.

In Saranac Lake on Friday at the Waterhole Pie Boys Flat begins at 10 pm. It’s Rugby Weekend so you know it’s going to be crazy. I listened to these guys online and I think they’ll do a fine job keeping everyone pumped and jumping with their blend of reggae, funk and rock.

Also on Friday in Plattsburgh Crow Party is playing at the Monopole at 10 pm. A great hard-hitting blues band as far as I’m concerned – my only complaint with these guys is that even though they purposely compose short songs, I sometimes wish they’d just keep playing. When the groove is really working and people are up and dancing more of the same is better than fine, it’s fantastic. Russ Bailey, Franz Pope and Matt Rabideau are all excellent musicians! Call 563-2222 for more information.

On Saturday Blues For Breakfast is playing at North Creek Station and is a Jerry Garcia tribute band. August 1st also happens to be Jerry Garcia’s birthday. I found out about this show from Nate Pelton’s website adkmusic.com. Thanks, Nate!

Looking into next week: On Monday, August 3rd at 11 am, Earthtunes will put on a interactive performance for children and adults at The Wild Center in Tupper Lake. Playing mandolin, viola and guitars, Steve Mayone and Barb Herson use different musical styles to teach their audiences about the environment and how to care for it.

On Tuesday, August 4th, The Pines Inn Songs at Mirror Lake series continues with Spiritual Rez. A 7-piece funky reggae band is giving a free 7 pm concert a Mid’s Park in Lake Placid. These concert are usually of a very high quality and excellent. I like what i’ve been listening to online of these guys.

photo: Russ Bailey of Crow Party


Monday, July 20, 2009

An Adirondack Midsummer Night’s Dream

Shakespeare in the Park is a city summer tradition. People pack a picnic and a blanket and go to their local green space to watch live drama under the trees. Now the Adirondack Lakes Center for the Arts has taken the concept to state park scale.

The Arts Center will present 45-minute outdoor productions of A Midsummer Night’s Dream at parks and beaches in twelve Adirondack towns. This regional adaptation of the play is as Elizabethan as Elizabethtown.

“In the original version the nobility of a town go into the woods for a night and strip away the trappings of society and find out what it’s like to be a human being,” says Arts Center Director Stephen Svoboda. “In our production the young lovers are going to be sophisticated summer people who come up to the Adirondacks in their Gucci shoes, not expecting this rustic world. The male faries will be romanticized lumberjacks and the female fairies have a Sixties hippie feel with long flowy fabric, and really they’re sort of the embodiment of nature. Then the Mechanicals are the acting troupe in the play; in our version they’re going to be these Beatnik actors from New York City all in black with their bug spray, and since a lot of these performances will be on a lake, they’ll show up in a canoe, lost in the wilderness.”

The production is appropriate for all ages and is free. “It’s really accessible to the audience, something that our summer residents and year-round residents can relate to,” Svoboda says.

See the Arts Center’s Web site for details and locations. Here is a general schedule:

July 25th 2 pm THENDARA 

July 25th 7 pm TUPPER LAKE

July 26th 2 pm BLUE MOUNTAIN LAKE

July 26th 7 pm LONG LAKE

July 28th 7 pm OLD FORGE 

July 29th 2 pm RAQUETTE LAKE

July 30th 2 pm MINERVA

July 30th 7 pm INDIAN LAKE

July 31st 2 pm Hudson River Pavilion, NORTH CREEK

July 31st 7 pm PAUL SMITHS/SARANAC LAKE
August 1st 2 pm INLET 

August 1st 7 pm SPECULATOR


Friday, July 17, 2009

Barrels, Buckets, and Casks: Coopering at Adk Museum

Coopering is the ancient art of making casks, barrels, vats, buckets, and other circular or elliptical wooden vessels bound together by hoops. Historically, wooden barrels were used for the storage and transportation of all sorts of goods. Coopering was a valuable skill. David Salvetti will demonstrate the art of coopering at the Adirondack Museum at Blue Mountain Lake on July 18, 19 and 20, 2009. The
demonstration will be held in the Mark W. Potter Education Center from 10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. and is included in the price of general admission.

David Salvetti’s love of woodworking began at age seven – with simple
projects such as birdhouses. In 2005, at the age of fourteen, woodworking became something more. The Salvetti family visited the Adirondack Museum in July of that year. The rustic furniture on exhibit fascinated David. Inspired by what he saw, Salvetti cut a sapling on the family’s property and built a twig chair. Another chair
followed in 2006 – winning “Best in Show” (4-H Youth Division) at the Oswego County Fair. David entered the white birch chair in the 2007 New York State Fair, Adult Arts and Crafts competition – winning another blue ribbon. David’s prize-winning rustic chair is on display at the Adirondack Museum and will become part of the permanent collection.

David Salvetti’s exploration of traditional woodworking techniques has led him to build his own shed, making shingles to cover the structure by hand. He has learned to make watertight wooden buckets without nails, adhesives, or modern sealants. He demonstrates his skills at Fort Ontario State Historic Site in Oswego, N.Y.

Coopering is part of a summer-long series of craft and trade demonstrations at the Adirondack Museum. To see a complete listing, visit the museum’s web site www.adirondackmuseum.org and click on “Special Events.”

Photo: Wooden sap bucket, ca. 1800s. Collection of the Adirondack Museum.


Wednesday, July 1, 2009

"In Search of the Picturesque" at Adirondack Museum

Nineteenth century armchair travelers and well-to-do American tourists eagerly read published travel guides and narratives, which often featured paintings reproduced as engravings. These images helped advance an artist’s reputation and marketability, and also shaped travelers’ expectations of the Adirondack wilderness. The Adirondack Museum‘s Chief Curator Laura Rice will lead visitors in search of the picturesque through the museum’s paintings, prints, rare maps, and photographs, many of which have never been exhibited during an illustrated program entitled “In Search of the Picturesque: Landscape and Tourism in the Adirondacks, 1820-1880” at the Adirondack Museum on Monday, July 6, 2009.

The first offering of the season in the Adirondack Museum’s Monday Evening Lecture series, the presentation will be held in the Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. There is no charge for museum members. Admission is $5.00 for non-members.

Rice will discuss how guidebook authors reinforced visual messages by using painterly language to describe scenes travelers would encounter along a given route. The visual and descriptive imagery promoted the Adirondacks as a public treasure, contributed to a national understanding of wilderness as evidence of God’s hand in creation, and fostered the development of wilderness as a national icon and reflection of the American character.

The Adirondack Museum introduced a new exhibit in 2009, “A ‘Wild, Unsettled Country’: Early Reflections of the Adirondacks,” that showcases paintings, maps, prints, and photographs illustrating the untamed Adirondack wilderness discovered by early cartographers, artists, and photographers.

Laura Rice joined the staff of the Adirondack Museum in 2003. She had previously served as a Curator, Museum Educator, and Consultant at a number of other museums. Ms. Rice holds a Master of Arts degree from the University of Pennsylvania in American Civilization with an emphasis on Museum Studies. She is the author of the award-winning book Maryland History in Prints: 1752 – 1900, a history of the state of Maryland based on selected images in the Maryland Historical Society Print Collection.

Photo: Untitled: Wolf Jaw Mountain, by Horace Wolcott Robbins, Jr., 1863.


Monday, June 22, 2009

Summer Events at the Adirondack Museum

Summer is a great time to check out the Adirondack Museum – here are a few events you won’t want to miss. You can see all the events we write about here at Adirondack Almanack by clicking the events link at right.

Paddle Making Classes with Caleb Davis
Friday, July 10 or Friday, August 7
Make your own traditional cherry or white ash paddle in a one-day class.
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. each day, including a 2-hour break for lunch on your own, and the chance to explore the museum. Limited space, pre-registration is required. $100 non-refundable fee due at registration. 518-352-7311 ext. 115.

Brown Bag Lunches
12:00 – 1:30 p.m. To reserve a space, please call 518-352-7311 ext. 181.

July 13 – “Mapping in the Adirondacks” – Join Librarian Jerry Pepper for a rare behind the scenes tour of the museum’s historic map collection.

August 3 – “A Perfect Fit: An Introduction to Adirondack Clothing” – Associate Curator Laura Cotton offers a presentation about Adirondack clothing from the museum’s textile collection.

August 31 – “Mining in the Adirondacks” – Chief Curator Laura Rice introduces the people and places of Adirondack mining through historic photographs, objects, and archaeology.

Member-Only Field Trips
Act fast to reserve your spot – spaces still remain for the following trips:

August 6 – Newton Falls – Tour one of the oldest and largest paper mills in the Adirondacks.

August 29 – St. Regis Lake – Paddle and explore St. Regis Lake once known as “the St. James of the Wilderness,” a reference to the stately Court of Queen Victoria.

September 2 – Dannemora Correctional Facility – A fascinating look at the third oldest prison in New York State.

For reservations please call 518-352-7311 ext. 181.

Visit the Special Events section of the museum’s web site at www.adirondackmuseum.org for the most up-to-date information about member-only programs and all events at the museum.


Sunday, June 21, 2009

Adirondack Center for Writing Publishing Conference

The Adirondack Center for Writing (ACW) has announced its annual Publishing Conference which will be held at the Adirondack Lakes Center for the Arts in Blue Mountain Lake on Saturday, July 18, 2009, from 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. This year’s focus is on New York State small presses.

Topics will include the advantages of publishing with a small press, some of which are –- writers usually do not need an agent; small presses often publish first-time authors; small presses tend to publish writing that large presses ignore; writers have more control over the final product with a small press than with large presses. Other subjects covered include how to submit your work to a small press, a process very different than with large presses, and how to find the small press that is right for you.

According to the Center’s Press release: Presenters include Mary Selden Evans, executive editor at Syracuse University Press. With more than 1,200 titles in print, SU Press consistently earns international critical acclaim and attracts award-winning authors of note. Each year Syracuse University Press publishes new and groundbreaking books in specialized areas including New York State; Robert Hershon, co-editor of Hanging Loose Press, one of the country’s oldest independent publishers. HL introduced the work of such writers as Sherman Alexie, Kimiko Hahn, Dennis Nurkse, and Cathy Park Hong, among others, and also publishes Ha Jin, Paul Violi, Jayne Cortez, Elizabeth Swados, Jack Anderson, Harvey Shapiro, Maureen Owen, Charles North – about 150 writers altogether. Rob Igoe, publisher at North Country Books, which publishes and distributes quality books about New York State and New England. Also presenting is Jeffrey Lependorf, who serves as the shared executive director to Small Press Distribution (www.spdbooks.org) and the Council of Literary Magazines and Presses (www.clmp.org), both national non-profit organizations serving the community of independent literary publishers. Lastly, Bruce McPherson of McPherson & Company, which concentrates on contemporary and 20th century fiction, foreign and domestic; and for nonfiction on contemporary culture, art theory, anthropology and film studies, will be part of this exciting conference.

For a brochure with complete details or to register, contact ACW at 518-327-6278 or by email at info@adirondackcenterforwriting.org.


Thursday, June 4, 2009

Adirondack Literary Awards Ceremony June 7th

The 4th Annual Adirondack Center For Writing (ACW) Literary Awards Ceremony will be held this Sunday, June 7, in Blue Mountain Lake, 3-5 pm at the Blue Mountain Center. The Adirondack Literary Awards is a juried awards program that honors books published in or about the Adirondacks in the previous year. The event is free and open to the public. Please RSVP to ACW (phone or email) if you plan to attend.

Juried awards will be given in fiction, poetry, children’s literature, and nonfiction, plus a People’s Choice Award. ACW members are encouraged to send in their votes for their favorite book of the year via email, phone, or mail. A complete list of submissions by category is below. Voting is also permitted at the awards ceremony itself. Most of the books considered for awards are made available for purchase at the ceremony by the authors, and they are happy to sign their books. Questions may be directed to ACW at 518-327-6278, acwevents@gmail.com.

Entries of Books Published in 2008

:

Fiction –
The Wettest County in the World
, Matt Bondurant,
 Scribner


Orebed Lake, Russell Hall
, Lighthall Books
Chant
, Rick Henry, 
BlazeVOX Books


Brio, Mary Randall
, Mary Randall


Christmas in Port Davis, (Stories by multiple authors)
, RA Press


Wilder Ponds
, Kirby White, 
Fox Creek Press

;

Poetry –


Reasons to Hate the Sky, Stuart Bartow
, WordTech Editions


Threat of Pleasure
, Philip Memmer, 
Word Press



Lemon Peeled the Moment Before: New and Selected Poems 1967-2008, 
Roger Mitchell
, Ausable Press;
The Long Fault: Poems, Jay Rogoff
, Louisiana State University;



Children’s Literature

 –
Butternuts for Rexford, Tom Adessa
, SassyKat Books
March Toward the Thunder, 
Joseph Bruchac
, Dial Books


Skylar, Mary Cuffe-Perez
, Philomel Books


Adirondack Gold II: A Summer of Strangers, 
Persis Granger
, Beaver Meadow Publishing
Champlain and the Silent One, Kate Messner, 
North Country Books


Catch the Wind and Spin, Spin, Spin
, Thomas M. Schneeberger, 
PublishAmerica
When Thunder Rolls: The Underground Railroad and The Civil War
, Irene Uttendorfsky
, Spruce Gulch Press


The Adirondack Kids 8: Escape from Black Bear Mountain
, Justin and Gary VanRiper, 
Adirondack Kids Press

Photography –
In Stoddard’s Footsteps: The Adirondacks Then & Now, 
Mark Bowie and Timothy Weidner, Stories, Food, Life, Editor, Ellen Rocco
, North Country Public Radio
Historic Images of the Adirondacks, 
Compiled by Victoria Verner Sandiford
Adirondack Hotels and Inns
, Donald Williams
, Arcadia Publishing

Nonfiction

 –
Stepping Out; A Tenderfoot’s Guide to the Principles, Practices, and Pleasures of Countryside Walking, 
Eleanor Garrell Berger
, Tenderfoot Press


Forest Enterprises of the Adirondacks, 
Steven Bick
, Forest Enterprise Institute

, North Country Books


At the Mercy of the Mountains: True Stories of Survival and Tragedy in New York’s Adirondacks
, Peter Bronski
, The Lyons Press
Adirondack Attic #5
, Andy Flynn, 
Hungry Bear Publishing
One Foot Forward; Walks in Upstate New York
, Richard B. Frost, Bloated Toe Publishing
Breaking Out of Prison: a guide to consciousness, compassion, and freedom, Bernice Mennis, 
iUniverse
Log Marks on the Hudson, Richard Merrill
, Nicholas K. Burns
Echoes In These Mountains, Glenn Pearsall
, Pyramid Publishing


Adirondack Birding, John M.C. Peterson, Gary Lee, 
Adirondack Mountain Club, Lost Pond Press


Stories, Food, Life, Editor, Ellen Rocco
, North Country Public Radio


, Adirondack Museum, North Country Books


Freedom in the Wilds: An Artist in the Adirondacks, about Harold Weston, 
Syracuse University Press




Sunday, April 26, 2009

New Anthology of Essays by Elizabeth Folwell

Adirondack Life turns 40 this year. In Park years, that’s the time it took to make 6,000 46ers, add 350,000 acres to the Forest Preserve and subtract 12 paper mills (by the magazine’s own count).

Another milestone has been reached: Betsy Folwell marks 20 years with Adirondack Life — half its existence — first as an editor, now as creative director and always, foremost in many readers’ minds, as a writer.

The magazine has published a 250-page anthology of Folwell’s essays called Short Carries, and her prose is even clearer and stronger against the plain white pages of a book.

Some of Folwell’s finely-turned phrases take hold from the moment you read them; they underlie how we see this landscape as much as the granite that dictates what kind of moss, ferns and trees root here. For me, one of her most unforgettable essays is “Lessons From a Dead Loon” (July/August 1989):

“‘I thought maybe you could do something about this,’ the conservation officer told me as he laid the dead loon on the grass. A number-four snelled hook was stuck in the bird’s throat; he had drowned at the end of a fisherman’s set-line off Rock Island in Blue Mountain Lake.”

What struck me is not only that cops seek Folwell out for help, but how acutely observant she is. She knew “our diver . . . one of a pair that made the daily circuit from Lake Durant to Blue Mountain, as predictable as church bells.” She knew her bird just as she knows Elvis, the curled-lip black bear that cruises her back yard; Gerard, the old river driver; the “tow-headed tamaracks” in the October bogs; and the tourists who held a tug-of-war over a Sunday New York Times at a general store she ran one summer.

Short Carries: Essays from Adirondack Life by Elizabeth Folwell is available for $16.95 at adirondacklife.com and in North Country bookstores.


Thursday, March 26, 2009

Sweet Stuff to Do This Adirondack Weekend

Birder, Audubon field editor and field-guide author Kenn Kaufman will speak about our migratory birds at 3 p.m. Friday at the Wilton Wildlife Preserve & Park office, 80 Scout Road in Wilton. It’s outside the Blue Line, but we know some Adirondack birders who are heading south to hear Kaufman. Talk is free but seating is limited, so pre-register by calling Wild Birds Unlimited at 226-0071.

Squeaker, Louie and Squirt are celebrating their birthdays with a party at the Wild Center in Tupper Lake Sunday. At 10:30 the otters will have an Easter egg hunt, and at 2:30 they’ll eat cake. In between there’s cake for people as well as otter-related storytimes, videos and art projects.

There will be good music along the East Branch Ausable River Friday night. Crown Point’s own Silver Family plays bluegrass at the Amos and Julia Ward Theatre in Jay at 7 p.m. (admission $5). And Willsboro’s own Hugh Pool plays bluesy rock and rocking blues at the Recovery Lounge in Upper Jay at 8 p.m. (donations accepted).

Doomers like to have fun too. A new group called Tri-Lakes Transition is launching a Wake Up Film Festival on Friday with The 11th Hour, narrated by Leonardo DiCaprio. The documentary explores the perilous state of the planet, and how we can change course. 7 p.m. at the Saranac Lake Free Library.

In Blue Mountain Lake, the Adirondack Lakes Center for the Arts will hold a Ukrainian Easter Egg (Pysanky) workshop with Annette Clarke Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Our friend Betsy, who knows things, says, “It’s not for kids but the real deal with Ukrainian dyes, etc. Like batik with hot wax and cool tools but harder than you’d think.” Cost is $25. Visit the center’s Web site for more information.

It’s Maple Weekend Part II: The Far North. Festivities that began last week expand to reach the top of the state, where the trees are finally waking up. “The goal of Maple Weekend is to share the real taste of the mouth-watering maple syrup with the public while also demonstrating the various ways to make it,” the New York maple producers association says. And it’s free. For a list of participating producers, see mapleweekend.com.


Friday, February 13, 2009

Adirondack Museum Seeks Textile Artisans

The Adirondack Museum is looking for talented fiber or fabric artisans and crafters to show and sell their wares at the Adirondack Fabric and Fiber Arts Festival planned for September 12, 2009. Spinning, weaving, knitting, and quilting will take center stage for the celebration of traditional and contemporary fiber arts. The day will include demonstrations, displays, presentations, a knit-in, and much more, as well as a juried marketplace of
fiber related products for sale.

Artisans and crafters from the across the Adirondack North Country are invited to apply for a space in the marketplace. The following are eligible for consideration by the committee: high quality handspun yarns, fine needlework, embellished and multi-media art pieces, fiber tools and accessories, knitted, knotted, woven, quilted felted or other unique handcrafted items.

All work displayed and sold at the Fabric and Fiber Arts Festival must be based on traditional techniques or patterns and/or inspired by the Adirondacks.

For full information or to receive an application please contact Jessica Rubin at the Adirondack Museum, Box 99, Blue Mountain Lake, N.Y. 12812, (518) 352-7311, ext. 115, jrubin@adkmuseum.org or Micaela Hall, (518)
352-7311, ext. 128, mhall@adkmuseum.org.

All submissions must include photographs and should be received by the Adirondack Museum no later than May 1, 2009.


Thursday, December 25, 2008

Adirondack Museum Offers Virtual Exhibits

The Adirondack Museum has announced that it will offer a series of online exhibitions created especially for people who are unable to visit Blue Mountain Lake. Web exhibits can be found on the Adirondack Museum’s web site at www.adirondackmuseum.org.

December marks the launch of “Adirondack Rustic: Nature’s Art, 1876-1950,” the first web exhibit. The new online feature offers artifacts, text, and historic photographs from the special exhibition that shared the multi-faceted story of Adirondack rustic traditions.

The web exhibit examines the rich history of Adirondack rustic in three units that examine furniture and designs inspired by wilderness, share stories of local men who hand crafted rustic furniture, and explore the lives and influence of wealthy Gilded Age railroad magnates who designed and built elaborate Great Camps.

The virtual exhibition is lavishly illustrated with images of rustic furniture and historic photographs from the museum’s extensive collections. The museum’s Chief Curator Laura Rice and Web Coordinator Erin Barton developed the content of the online exhibit.

In 2009 the museum will introduce “Common Threads: 150 Years of Adirondack Quilts and Comforters” as a companion piece to the special exhibition of the same name that will open at the museum on May 22, 2009.