Posts Tagged ‘boating’

Monday, December 3, 2018

New Book On Adirondack Guideboats Published

adirondack guideboat bookThe life’s work of Stephen Sulavik, The Adirondack Guideboat: Its Origins, Its Builders and Their Boats (Bauhan Publishing, 2018) provides a heavily illustrated history of the iconic Adirondack guideboat.

Stephen Sulavik was a pulmonary surgeon fascinated by the guideboats. Upon his death, his book was shepherded to publication by his friend and former Chairman of the Board of the Adirondack Museum, Robert Worth. He enlisted the help of historian Edward “Ted” Comstock and guideboat builder and expert Christopher Woodward to revise and complete the project. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, October 4, 2018

Willsboro, Peru Boat Launch Work Planned

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has announced that needed repairs on two boat launches on Lake Champlain – the Peru Dock Boat Launch and the Willsboro Bay Boat Launch – are set to be undertaken during the month of October.

DEC is replacing a culvert under the exit lane of the Peru Dock Boat Launch which is causing problems for boat motors and trailers exiting the boat launch and addressing other water drainage issues at the site. The repairs will begin October 9 and are expected to be completed on October 17. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, September 27, 2018

Current Adirondack Outdoor Recreation Conditions (Sept 27)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled each Thursday afternoon and fully updated by Friday afternoon.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Add a comment below, or send your observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com.

Learn and practice the seven Leave No Trace principles. Carry out what you have carried in. Do not leave gear, food, or other items at lean-tos and campsites. Do not litter. Take the free online Leave No Trace course here.

BE PREPARED! Start slow, gain experience. Always carry proper safety equipment – including plenty of food, water, flashlights, space blanket, emergency whistle, first aid kit, fire making tools, extra clothing layers and socks, and a map and compass – inform someone of your itinerary, and be prepared to spend an unplanned night in the woods in cold temperatures. Just before entering the backcountry or launching a boat check the National Weather Service watches, warnings, and advisories here. Follow Adirondack weather forecasts at Burlington and Albany and consult the High Elevation, Recreation, or Lake Champlain forecasts.

SEPTEMBER 27, 2018 – SPECIAL NOTICES » Continue Reading.


Thursday, September 20, 2018

Current Adirondack Outdoor Recreation Conditions (Sept 20)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled each Thursday afternoon and fully updated by Friday afternoon.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Add a comment below, or send your observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com.

Learn and practice the seven Leave No Trace principles. Carry out what you have carried in. Do not leave gear, food, or other items at lean-tos and campsites. Do not litter. Take the free online Leave No Trace course here.

BE PREPARED! Start slow, gain experience. Always carry proper safety equipment – including plenty of food, water, flashlights, space blanket, emergency whistle, first aid kit, fire making tools, extra clothing layers and socks, and a map and compass – inform someone of your itinerary, and be prepared to spend an unplanned night in the woods in cold temperatures. Just before entering the backcountry or launching a boat check the National Weather Service watches, warnings, and advisories here. Follow Adirondack weather forecasts at Burlington and Albany and consult the High Elevation, Recreation, or Lake Champlain forecasts.

SEPTEMBER 20, 2018 – SPECIAL NOTICES » Continue Reading.


Monday, September 17, 2018

A Perfect Storm of Bad Luck; One Tough Guy on Black Lake

A front-runner for 1930s “it seemed like a good idea at the time” award was 40-year-old Harry Baxter of Syracuse. In early September, he and his wife, Louisa, and one of their sons were camping at Black Lake in western St. Lawrence County. Thirty-six hours later he was in desperate straits, clinging to a small, rocky island and life itself.

Harry’s troubles resulted from a series of questionable choices. The first was fishing from a small boat in conditions that Baxter himself later described as heavy seas. The second was going alone, perhaps not the best idea, and the third was where he chose to fish — after all, alone and in stormy waters, where else to set up but near the center of the lake, which spans more than two miles at its widest point.

Because the water was quite rough, he anchored both ends of the boat, enabling him to stay in one spot to fish. While it seemed like a good idea at the time, it also prevented the boat from moving with the water, thus making capsizing much more likely from wave action and water splashing into the boat. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Lorraine Duvall: Weller Pond Protests and Quiet Waters

Weller Pond canoe inAs an advocate for quiet waters, on August 18, 2018, I joined with 36 canoes and guide boats on a Canoe-In to Weller Pond and Little Weller Pond to lobby for no motors on these pristine bodies of water (cul-de-sacs of the Saranac Chain of Lakes.) As we paddled toward the channel to Weller Pond nine powerboats lined the shore of nearby Hungry Bay. We chanted “All we want is 2%: You have 98,” referencing the amount of the waters open to motors on these lakes. The entire 17.5- mile route from Lower Saranac to Upper Saranac Lake allows for the unlimited use of motorboats.

The motor-boaters held signs urging that Weller be kept open to them. After hearing about the Canoe-In, they had sponsored an advertisement in the Adirondack Daily Enterprise on August 11 encouraging “Motorboat owners and boat enthusiasts to come and show your support in preserving and protecting our rights on the water.” » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Sacandaga Lake: Man Rescued From Sinking Boat

small capsizing on Sacandaga LakeNYS Environmental Conservation Officer (ECO) Scott Pierce reported that on August 20th he was patrolling the Sacandaga Lake when he noticed a small boat along the shoreline. ECO Pierce said he approached the vessel, a 14-foot-long pram powered by an electric motor operated by an older gentleman who said he was looking for Moffit’s Beach State Campsite, about a mile across the lake.

ECO Pierce reported that he asked the man if he had a life vest on board and he did not, so he gave the man a spare life vest from his patrol boat. With the winds picking up, the man put it on and headed for the campground, saying he would return the life vest to the campground office when he was done with it, according to ECO Pierce. » Continue Reading.


Friday, August 24, 2018

Blue Mountain Lake Flotilla Festival Sunday

Prospect House on Blue Mountain LakeThe 2nd Blue Mountain Lake flotilla has been set for August 26, 2018.

136 years ago on Blue Mountain Lake, a steamboat glided through towing some 75 rowboats and their passengers. An orchestra played, a cannon roared salute, Gospel singers raised their voices, and shining Chinese lanterns hung from the boats, and floated on the waves.

Last summer, the Blue Mountain Lake Flotilla sailed again. It marked the first time the event took place since the original was held, on the same waters in August of 1882. And now the boats are returning again, highlighting a day of music, food and fun for the whole family. » Continue Reading.


Monday, August 20, 2018

Wooden Boat Show In Lake George Saturday

Lake George RendezvousThe Annual Lake George Rendezvous is set to bring around 50 antique and classic boats to Lake George on Saturday August 25th, from 9 am to 4 pm.

Now in its 45th year, this free boat show is held at the Lake George Village public docks on Beach Road and is open to the public. On display will be antique, historic, unique and classic boats from the early 20th century through today. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 14, 2018

20 Years After Canoe-In for Wilderness at Little Tupper Lake

Motorless lakes protest courtesy Nancie BattagliaWednesday marks the 20th anniversary of the Canoe-In for Wilderness on Little Tupper Lake. On August 15, 1998, over 300 people in over 200 canoes, kayaks, guide-boats, rowboats, and one small sailboat, rallied on the sloping lawns of the Whitney Headquarters on the shore of Little Tupper Lake and then paddled out onto the lake in a massive flotilla in the Canoe-In for Wilderness at Little Tupper Lake.

This event was the biggest environmental rally in a very challenging and divisive time in Adirondack Park history. Those who gathered that day were unabashed in their support for a Wilderness classification for the newly purchased Little Tupper Lake. A number of important motorless waters were created in the years after the Canoe-In for Wilderness. In 1998, there had not been a major piece of land classified as Wilderness since the late 1980s when the Blue Ridge and West Canada Lake Wilderness Areas were expanded around Cedar River Flow. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Adirondack Ranger Report: Boating Death, Injured Hikers

DEC Forest RangerNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents in the Adirondacks. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the Adirondack backcountry.

What follows is a report, prepared by DEC, of recent missions carried out by Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 5, 2018

Canoe-In for Motorless Weller Pond Planned

weller ponds mapProtect the Adirondacks is hosting a Canoe-In for Motorless Waters on Weller Pond on Saturday, August 18, 2018. PROTECT is aiming to get 100 canoes and kayaks in a flotilla of protest calling for state action to make Weller Pond and Little Weller Pond motorless waters.

The protest is starting at 10 am. People who plan to attend should register online. Boat rentals are available in the area.

“Weller Pond and Little Weller Pond should be managed by the State of New York as a quiet waters area, made off-limits to motorized watercraft and only accessible by non-motorized vessels. These ponds should be managed by state agencies as a quiet and beautiful refuge and respite among the heavily motorized and extremely popular Saranac Lakes Chain,” Peter Bauer, executive director of Protect the Adirondacks, said in an announcement sent to the press.

PROTECT issued the following list of reasons why the Weller Ponds should be motorless: » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Free New York Safe Boating Course in Ray Brook

A free two-day boater safety course will be held at New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Region 5 headquarters in Ray Brook on July 28 and 29.

Anyone born after May 1, 1996, must pass an approved boater safety course to legally operate a motor boat. In addition, New York State Law requires a boating safety course for the operation of personal watercraft (PWC). » Continue Reading.


Thursday, June 28, 2018

Hot, Humid Adirondack Outdoor Conditions This Weekend (June 28)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled each Thursday afternoon and fully updated by Friday afternoon.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Add a comment below, or send your observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com.

Learn and practice the seven Leave No Trace principles. Carry out what you have carried in. Do not leave gear, food, or other unwanted or unneeded items at lean-tos and campsites. Do not litter. Take the free online Leave No Trace course here.

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND
» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Lake Champlain’s 2018 State of the Lake Report Issued

lake champlain state of the lake 2018The Lake Champlain Basin Program has released the 2018 State of the Lake and Ecosystem Indicators Report. The report, produced every three years, provides an assessment of the condition of Lake Champlain. The report also serves to provide the public and resource managers with a better understanding of threats to the lake’s health, as well as opportunities to meet the challenges ahead.

The 2018 report emphasizes the importance of community engagement and recreation opportunities to help stakeholders connect with the Lake, and understand the importance of protecting this resource. The report highlights the success of the LCBP Boat Launch Steward program, in which over ten thousand boaters at public launches each year are  informed about the importance of properly decontaminating their gear before entering the Lake, and when leaving. The report also highlights a lack of change in phosphorus conditions across the Lake, and describes changes in the amount of phosphorus delivered to the lake each year. » Continue Reading.