Posts Tagged ‘Bob Marshall Wild Lands Complex’

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Brian Houseal Leaving Adirondack Council Leadership

Brian L. Houseal will be leaving his post as Executive Director of the Adirondack Council, after a decade leading the largest Adirondack-centered environmental conservation advocacy organization. Houseal is expected to be replaced at the end of October by Deputy Director Diane Fish of Lake Placid who will serve as Acting Executive Director while a new Executive Director is sought.

Reflecting on his tenure in a statement prepared for the press Houseal said, “I have had the honor of moving forward with a legacy endowed to us by some of the greatest conservationists in our country. Louis and Bob Marshall, Clarence Petty, the Council’s founders, and many other directors, staff and members over the years have all fought to uphold Article XIV – the Forever Wild Clause – of New York State’s Constitution, unique in the world as a people’s commitment to wilderness preservation. That vision and constellation of stars provides the compass bearing that guides our team every day.” » Continue Reading.


Friday, September 2, 2011

6.1 Million Adirondack Acres Leave Plenty to Do

Although Hurricane Irene has wrought considerable destruction on the Eastern High Peaks area of the Adirondacks, aside from a few unfortunate communities, trails and campgrounds, the vast majority of the Adirondack Park was left unscathed and open for business. This Labor Day weekend and the coming months offer a great opportunity to explore the rest of the Adirondack Park’s 6.1 million acres.

The Adirondack Park has a land area larger than than Vermont. At 9,400 square miles, the Park is bigger than Yellowstone, Yosemite, Grand Canyon, Glacier, and Great Smoky Mountains National Parks combined. Yet, many visitors rarely get out of the Lake Placid-High Peaks Region to explore places like the Fulton, Saranac or Raquette chains, the half-million acre Bob Marshall Wild Lands Complex in the southwest, the St. Regis Canoe Area, or the some three-quarter million acres of newly acquired easement lands. » Continue Reading.


Monday, December 20, 2010

Commentary: Adirondack Development, Population Growth

I heard some harsh criticism over my last commentary on protecting our open forests. “There are far too many who are willing to buy into the idea that we have enough, or that what open forests we have should be opened to every purpose under the sun, essentially no restrictions except on houses and highways,” I argued, suggesting that the proposed 409,000 acre Bob Marshall- Oswegatchie Great Wilderness Area was a good idea.

One theme that seemed to emerge from the detractors was the imminent death of Adirondack communities in the face of more wilderness. “The problem is yet down the road and the end is coming shortly I fear,” one wrote. What end? “The end of the communities and the livelihood of the most endangered species in the park; the year-round resident.” Another decried “The end of sustainable communities” and “The end of multi-generational, year-round residents.” » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, December 14, 2010

John Warren: Protecting Our Open Forests

Taking a look at the discussion on Phil Brown’s piece yesterday – largely a debate over whether we should open roads in wilderness areas to mountain bikes and other uses – I found myself thankful that there are still a few people like Dan Plumley and Adirondack Wild who have a larger and deeper understanding of what wilderness is and why it’s important. Here’s some of what Plumley had to say in that discussion:

“It is all too easy for us to think of our own recreational desires first and forget about the long term goals of gaining, over time, truly wild conditions of relatively intact wilderness protected by law and our state constitution. Given the biodiversity values, the potential for moose, possibly wolf and mountain lion recovery eventually, watershed preservation and truly remote – by foot and paddle – experiences without mechanized vehicles (including like it or not, mountain bikes), these rare opportunities are too important for the future to short cut.” » Continue Reading.



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