Posts Tagged ‘DEC’

Wednesday, September 9, 2020

Forest rangers rescue hikers on Marcy and Azure mountains

forest ranger logoRecent DEC forest ranger actions:

Town of Waverly
Franklin County
Wilderness Rescue
: On Sept. 5 at 4 p.m., DEC’s Ray Brook Dispatch received a call from a hiker reporting that his wife had injured her ankle about a half mile from the trailhead of Azure Mountain. Forest Ranger Lt. Harjung responded along with Forest Rangers Balerno and Evans, the St. Regis Falls Fire Department, and EMS. Once on scene, Lt. Harjung splinted the injury and the group started slowly making their way down the trail. The injured hiker was able to get down off the steeper slope with the assistance of hiking poles and leaning on the shoulders of rescuers. The responders then placed the subject in a litter and carried her the remainder of the way to the trailhead. The hiker declined additional medical treatment and said she would seek treatment on her own.

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Monday, September 7, 2020

New Upgrades and Functionality for DECInfo Locator 

DEC logoDEC Commissioner Basil Seggos has announced new upgrades and functionality for the online DECinfo Locator tool that provides enhanced access to DEC documents and public data about the environment and outdoor recreation resources. DECinfo Locator was launched a year ago with over 50 data layers and now boasts more than 65, with more on the way.

Water-related data layers include:

  • Wastewater Facilities (SPDES permits)
  • Water Withdrawal Annual Reports
  • Dams and Associated Regulatory Program Data
  • Water Inventory/Priority Waterbody List (WI/PWL)
  • Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)
  • Regulatory Tidal Wetlands

To access the mapping application, visit the DECinfo Locator webpage. Learn more about its features from the DECinfo Locator Tutorial on YouTube.


Thursday, September 3, 2020

DEC opens comments for Fish Creek Campground management plan

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation is accepting public comments through Oct. 2 on a Draft Unit Management Plan (UMP) for Fish Creek Pond Campground and Day Use Area in Franklin County. The DEC encourages public input on the draft plan, in order to help guide future management of the facility over the next half a decade.

“DEC is working to connect more New Yorkers with the outdoors. This UMP addresses vital infrastructure improvements that will enhance the camping experience, recreational access and tourism at this signature DEC campground. In addition to camping, Fish Creek Pond Campground provides abundant opportunities for boating, paddling, fishing, and hiking,” Acting Regional Director Joe Zalewski said about the plans.

 

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Sunday, August 16, 2020

DEC seeks photographers to provide wildlife photos

The DEC Bureau of Wildlife is seeking photographs  to use in all DEC materials, including reports, social media, posters, newsletters, and for their website. New York State’s wildlife has been busier than ever this summer. The DEC invites citizens to capture and share the best moments of their local wildlife. If you sit outside and watch, you may be surprised at what you see.

Submit photos online until Friday, Sept. 11 at 11:59 am. Remember to stay safe while watching wildlife, and do so in a manner that is not harmful to them.


Friday, August 14, 2020

Outdoor conditions (8/14): A reminder to Leave no Trace

Outdoor conditions logoThe Welcome to the Adirondacks web page is the place to go if you are interested in learning more about the Adirondacks. It provides information about the Forest Preserve and conservation easement lands, outdoor recreation opportunities, and Leave No Trace.. Be sure to check out the links to additional information, like outdoor conditions, and tips for recreating safely and minimizing your impacts on natural resources, recreational infrastructure, and other backcountry users in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 13, 2020

DEC Opens Wildlife Management Areas for 16-Day Window

DEC logoThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is opening several Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) in Jefferson and St. Lawrence counties  to the public from Saturday, Aug. 15, through Sunday Aug. 30.

Parts of these wetland restricted areas are normally marked off in order to allow waterfowl and other listed species to breed and raise their young away from the interference of humans.

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Tuesday, August 11, 2020

DEC Reminds Hikers to Follow Common Sense Rules of the Outdoors

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation would like to remind hikers, and all who enjoy outdoor recreation to follow the “common sense rules of the outdoors,” such as preparing for arduous conditions, avoiding sensitive ecology, picking up your trash, and respecting your fellow visitors and those working to protect our wilderness.

We are currently experiencing a boom in outdoor recreation, with areas of the Adirondack park and the Catskill Parks reaching record numbers of visitors. Issues of littering, trash, and unprepared hikers affecting natural resources have increased in proportion to these record numbers, and it is essential to reinforce these common sense rules in order to protect both the safety of the public and the integrity of the sensitive plants and wildlife.

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Sunday, August 9, 2020

DEC gives tips for Green Giveaways

Everyone has something they have received for free from some sort of convention, fair, conference or event. Most of us let these free giveaways and trinkets pile up in drawers and desks until they are eventually thrown out.

Once they are thrown out, they pile up in a landfill somewhere and the resources that went into making them end up being wasted as well. Many of the popular promotional items chosen to be giveaways are not recyclable, things such as stress balls, flash drives, and other tiny plastic oddities.

When the world starts back up again and large-scale events with promotional giveaways start happening again, check out the DEC’s “Green Your Giveaways” PDF Guide to help plan better promotional items without unintentionally increasing your carbon footprint. The DEC recommends the following tips when purchasing the items that you need:

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Wednesday, August 5, 2020

DEC Seeking Public’s Help in Locating Stolen Aluminum Beams

DEC logoNew York Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Environmental Conservation Police Officers are asking for the public’s assistance in locating five aluminum beams, also known as “spillway stop logs,” that were stolen from Perch River Wildlife Management Area in Jefferson County. The aluminum beams were last seen and photographed on July 16, 2020. During a July 23, 2020 inspection, the beams were missing.

The beams are 12 feet long, nine inches tall, and six-and-a-half inches wide. The beams weigh approximately 150 pounds.

If anyone has information that could assist with the investigation, please call Investigator Mark Malone with DEC Police at 1-877-457-5680 and reference case number 20-052836.


Monday, August 3, 2020

Signs of Southern Pine Beetle

The DEC’s Forest Health Team has seen great success in preventing the southern pine beetle from destroying the pine barrens of Long Island. (Visit this link for more information). If you live on Long Island or the Hudson Valley, be sure to keep your eyes open for signs of the southern pine beetle, which is active and flying around now. Some common signs of this beetle include a group of pine trees with needles yellowing at the same time, pitch tubes or popcorn-shaped clumps of resin on the tree’s bark extending all the way up the tree, and tiny scattered holes on the bark of a tree.

It is not yet established whether the southern pine beetle is in the Hudson Valley, and the DEC asks for help in finding any potential infestations early in order to keep it this way.

If you have seen any signs or suspect and activity in either of these regions of New York, please submit a report of your findings to NY iMapInvasives on their free mobile app, or their online system, available for viewing here.

View photos of the southern pine beetle and find more information on the DEC’s website.


Sunday, August 2, 2020

DEC Seeks Swimming Pool Owners for Citizen Science Survey of Invasive Beetle

The early discovery of Asian Long Horned Beetle infestations saves money and trees.

State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos is encouraging the citizens of New York, especially those that own swimming pools, to engage in the DEC’s Annual Asian Long horned beetle Swimming Pool Survey.

Asian long horned beetles (ALB) emerge as adults during the late summer and become the most active outside of their host trees. The goal of this survey is to pinpoint the locations of these infestations before they cause detrimental damage to our state’s forests and trees.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 30, 2020

How to Identify Giant Hogweed

Giant Hogweed is an invasive plant which blooms across many parts of New York State, and summer is the ideal time to spot this harmful invasive. Giant Hogweed is a large flowering plant from Eurasia with sap that can cause painful burns and scarring. Adult Giant Hogweed plants are 7 to 14 feet tall with umbrella shaped clusters of white flowers up to 2.5 feet wide. Its stem is green with purple splotches, and coarse white hairs. Its leaves are large and can be up to 5 feet across. They are incised and deeply lobed. Visit the DEC’s site for more identification tips, including a table of lookalikes by clicking here.

If you suspect that you have found a Giant Hogweed plant, be sure not to touch it. From a safe distance take photos of the plant’s stem, leaves, flowers, seeds, and then the whole plant. Report your siting to the DEC by emailing photos (or calling DEC staff at (845) 256-3111) and reporting location information here:  [email protected]. DEC staff will help you confirm if you have found Giant Hogweed, and work with the landowners of confirmed sites to provide information on the plant, and how to control its spread.Ss


Wednesday, July 29, 2020

DEC Announces New Dates for Guiding License Exam

DEC logoThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced that the Licensed Guides exam for anyone currently registered is now scheduled for Saturday, Aug. 1. This exam will be offered to all applicants that previously signed up to take the exam. Out of an abundance of caution and to limit the community spread of COVID-19, DEC previously postponed examinations scheduled in March, April, May, and June. Exams for new applicants will be held Sept. 17. 

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Tuesday, July 14, 2020

The cycle of killing habituated bears continues

black bearSeveral campsites and lean-tos were temporarily closed in the High Peaks Wilderness on July 5 due to an aggressive black bear that had been roaming the area looking for human food.

A day later the state Department of Environmental Conservation captured and later killed the animal.

As DEC officials have often said to me in these situations, “A fed bear is a dead bear.”

What does that mean? It means if a bear gets food from humans too many times, it will get habituated to the food. The bear will then continue to seek out food from campers, especially when natural food sources aren’t available such as during dry years. In some cases, the bear will then get too close to people and be considered dangerous. In these situations, bears don’t win. Instead, they are killed.

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Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Proposed Rule Change for waterfowl hunting

duck decoys

Due to a slow, but steady decline in mallards across the northeastern United States, the mallard daily bag limit remains two birds (one hen) per day. Please see the Declining Mallards in the Atlantic Flyway (PDF) brochure for more information.

The Canada goose season length in the Northeast, West Central, East Central, Hudson Valley, and Lake Champlain zones remains 30 days with a limit of two per day. Please see the Status and Management of Atlantic Population Canada Geese (PDF) brochure for more information.

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