Posts Tagged ‘DEC’

Saturday, July 1, 2017

Blue Line Basics: An Adirondack Park History Primer

Map of the Adirondack Plateau showing the position & condition of existing forests 1884Noted land surveyor Verplanck Colvin raised the alarm about threats to Adirondack resources as early as 1868.

In 1884, a state forest commission created this detailed map of remaining timber resources in northern New York.

Later, a 1891 map included an outline of a proposed Adirondack Park, delineated by a line drawn in blue ink. This is considered by historians to be the first map of the Adirondack Park. Over time, the term “blue line”came to represent the actual boundary of the Adirondack Park.

On May 20, 1892, New York Governor Roswell P. Flower signed a law creating a 2.8 million-acre Adirondack Park. Today, the park offers an array of outdoor recreation opportunities, including more than 1,800 miles of trails and thousands of camping spots. » Continue Reading.


Friday, June 30, 2017

High Peak Trails And Creeks Flooding, Large Saranac River Rise

The following Adirondack trails as well as many creeks are flooding or at flood stage:

Ward Brook Trail/Sewards flooded

South end of Avalanche Lake flooded to Lake Colden register

Indian Falls not passable – water waist deep

Indian Pass Brook toward Street & Nye flooded

Water crossing at Ore Bed Lean-To Not Passable

Bushnell Falls crossing to John Brooks Valley is not passable

MAJOR RISE ON SARANAC RIVER: The water at Lake Flower is 22” above the dam and dam will be lowered by 8” tomorrow to relieve the pressure.  People are encouraged to stay off the Saranac River.


Friday, June 30, 2017

DEC To Reopen Saranac Chain Lower Locks July 1

Repairs and rehabilitation work on the Lower Locks in the Saranac Chain have been completed and the locks will be open for use on July 1.

Improvements included rehabilitating the fill and release doors and the wicket (main) doors, including replacing all seals and bearings; completely replacing the hydraulic system including hydraulic arms, lines and operating system; repairing concrete walls; replacing and re-equipping the Locks Operator Shed; and replacing all tie downs, ropes, and other equipment. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 27, 2017

E.coli Testing Continues At Reopened Million Dollar Beach

Million Dollar Beach reopened again Saturday, June 24, after E.coli tested at a level safe for swimming, according to a DEC press release that also said if the levels rise again, signs will be posted at the beach letting swimmers know of a closure. Daily sampling of the water will continue.

The town, village, DEC and a number of other local organizations concerned with the lake water continue to try to identify a possible source of E.coli affecting the beach.

Patrick Dowd, director of communication for the Lake George Association, said the agencies have had some success eliminating potential sources. For instance, dye-testing was completed on some of the main lines on the east side of the lake on Beedy Road, Rose Point Lane and Front Street. The town and village also used a closed circuit camera to rule out breaks and cracks in storm and sanitary lines and approved a contract to continue the testing of more lines. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 27, 2017

DEC Releases Proposed Solid Waste Regs For Public Comment

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced they are proposing amended revisions to the state’s Solid Waste Management Regulations, commonly referred to as Part 360. DEC’s Part 360 regulations set design standards and operational criteria for all solid waste management facilities.

A link to the text of the proposed revisions and associated rulemaking documents is available on DEC’s website.

Oral and written comments on the proposed rulemaking will be accepted at a public hearing on Thursday, July 13 at 1 pm at DEC’s headquarters at 625 Broadway, Albany. Comments may also be emailed to SolidWasteRegulations@dec.ny.gov until 5 pm on July 21, 2017.

 


Monday, June 26, 2017

Comments Sought on Cedarlands Easement Access Plan

Cedarlands EasementThe draft Cedarlands Conservation Easement Recreation Management Plan (RMP) has been released for public review and comment by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).

The 4,865-acre Cedarlands Easement is located in the town of Long Lake, Hamilton County in the central Adirondacks. The conservation easement divides the property into four areas, each of which has different restrictions. The conservation easement provides for some public recreation rights on the 3,309-acre McRorie Lake Area for 10 months (between August 24 and June 23), and year-round on the 592-acre Mud Pond Area. The 674-acre Long Lake Area and the 289-acre Base Camp Area are not available for public use.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, June 26, 2017

Recent Adirondack Search and Rescue Operations

DEC Forest RangerNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents in the Adirondacks. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the Adirondack backcountry.

What follows is a report, prepared by DEC, of recent missions carried out by Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, June 24, 2017

DEC Seeks Volunteers for Trail Maintenance in Adirondacks

DEC is seeking volunteers to maintain trails in the towns of Peru and Black Brook in Clinton County and town of Chesterfield in Essex County.

You can be part of a one-day work group, a three-day once a year effort, or a few hours on numerous days throughout the year – during the week or on weekends – whatever works best for you. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Rangers Find Boy Missing Overnight Near Schroon Lake

Forest Rangers found a 10-year-old Sunday morning in good health after he went missing overnight in the Pharaoh Lake Wilderness.

Forest Ranger James Waters said he found the boy (who forest rangers wouldn’t identify because of his age) about a mile off the Short Swing Trail.

Waters had been on the way to meet up with another forest ranger near Gooseneck Pond when he took a break atop a boulder field. While taking a break, Waters yelled out, hoping the boy would hear him, which is standard during search-and-rescue missions. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 20, 2017

High Peaks Overuse: Make Cascade an Educational Asset

Over the past few months Governor Andrew Cuomo has shown his economic love for the Adirondacks by putting his money where his mouth is, pledging $32 million towards an Adirondack Gateway facility at Frontier Town in North Hudson and another $20 million for improvements to the Gore, Whiteface and Mt Van Hoevenberg ski centers.

Seeing as generosity is in the air, I have a proposal:  let’s take a small portion of the monetary love intended for these projects and turn Cascade Mountain from a dangerous and degraded poster child for Adirondack overuse to a model of Wilderness education that becomes an asset in the struggle to protect the High Peaks. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Comments Sought On Saranac Lakes Wild Forest Changes

saranac lake ump trails and parkingWhat follows is a press release from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), announcing that the draft Saranac Lakes Wild Forest Unit Management Plan (UMP) for 76,000 acres of Forest Preserve lands in the Adirondacks has been released for public review and comment.

Saranac Lakes Wild Forest (SLWF) is comprised of 76,000 acres of Forest Preserve lands and 19,600 acres of lakes, rivers, streams, and ponds in the towns of Santa Clara, Brighton, Tupper Lake, Harrietstown, and Franklin in Franklin County and the towns of St. Armand and North Elba in Essex County. Three of the largest population centers in the Adirondack Park – the villages of Tupper Lake, Saranac Lake, and Lake Placid – are located within the general boundaries of the unit. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, June 11, 2017

DEC Advises Motorists to Be Alert for Turtles Crossing the Road

painted turtleThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has reminded the public that the state’s native turtles are on the move in seeking sandy areas or loose soil to lay their eggs. Drivers that see a turtle on the road should use caution and should not swerve suddenly or leave their lane of travel, but take care to avoid hitting turtles while driving.

In New York, thousands of turtles are killed each year when they are struck by vehicles as the turtles migrate to their nesting areas. New York’s 11 native species of land turtles are in decline, and turtles can take more than 10 years to reach breeding age. The reptiles lay just one small clutch of eggs each year, which means the loss of a breeding female can have a significant effect on the local turtle population.  » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 6, 2017

DEC Creates New High Peaks Trail Crew

The state Department of Environmental Conservation has created a new 5-person trail crew for the High Peaks.

According to DEC spokesman Delamater Benning, this is the DEC’s “first five-person trail crew in more than 20 years, and they are going to focus on high priority High Peak projects.”

Benning said the new trail crew was created after DEC Region 5 staff said there was a need to upgrade some high priority trails in the High Peaks. » Continue Reading.


Monday, June 5, 2017

More Rec Development For Lake George’s Eastern Shore

Shelving Rock Lake George MapNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and the Town of Fort Ann have announced efforts to improve parking on Shelving Rock Road, and access along Dacy Clearing Road in the Lake George Wild Forest.

Town of Fort Ann crews is planning to construct a new parking area on DEC managed Forest Preserve lands along Shelving Rock Road and rehabilitate the eight existing parking areas. Together, the nine parking areas will provide parking for 92 vehicles.

The popular Shelving Rock Day Use Area on the eastern shore of Lake George provides access to Shelving Rock Bay, Shelving Rock Falls, the summits of nearby Buck, Sleeping Beauty, and Shelving Rock Mountains, and climbing routes on Shelving Rock and Sleeping Beauty Mountain. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Lake George Beach Upgrades; Swimming Banned at ‘Dog Beach’

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that a new gate, sidewalk lighting, increased access, and extended hours are all planned for Lake George (aka Million Dollar) Beach this summer. The improvements to the gates, lighting, and signage cost an estimated $33,000.

In addition to these changes at Lake George Beach, DEC announced that swimming will be prohibited along the shoreline between West Creek and the beach – the area commonly referred to as “Dog Beach” for its popularity among dog owners.  The Village of Lake George is currently building a dog park at the recreation area on Route 9N near the transfer station. The new facility, which will have separate areas for large (over 50 pounds) and medium / small dogs, is expected to be open by July 4th.  The free Dog Park will be open from dawn until dusk and feature water, shade, and benches. » Continue Reading.


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