Posts Tagged ‘education’

Friday, December 1, 2017

Paul Smith’s College Offering Accelerated Culinary Program

paul smiths culinary classPaul Smith’s College is now offering an Associate of Occupational Science (AOS) degree in Culinary Arts, an accelerated culinary program to be completed in just three semesters.

Aimed toward aspiring culinary professionals, the program is designed to take place over the course of five 10-week sessions and afford students an opportunity to combine academics and work experiences. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, November 16, 2017

DEC Announces Summer Camp Registrations Open

dec summer campNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that online registration for the agency’s 2018 Summer Camps program will open Wednesday, January 24, 2018, at 10 am. Applications should be submitted through the online registration program. Parents and guardians are encouraged to register early since some of the weeks fill up quickly.

Now in its 71st year, the Summer Camps program offers week-long adventures in conservation education for children ages 11-17. DEC operates four residential camps for children: Camp Colby in Saranac Lake (Franklin County); Camp DeBruce in Livingston Manor (Sullivan County); Camp Rushford in Caneadea (Allegany County), and Pack Forest in Warrensburg (Warren County). » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Pete Nelson: Be Wary of Corporate Power in a Constitutional Convention

Article 14, Section 1 New York State Constitution Forever Wild clauseOn Tuesday, November 7th, New Yorkers have an opportunity to vote on Ballot Proposition 1: whether the State will hold a constitutional convention in 2019. Many of my colleagues in the Adirondack environmental world are urging a “No” vote. Anticipating that such a convention would be heavily influenced by moneyed special interests, they are concerned with possible threats to the legendary “Forever Wild” constitutional amendment that protects the Adirondack and Catskill Forest Preserves. They reason correctly that Forever Wild, being the gold standard in wilderness protection, cannot be improved, only weakened, and they don’t want to see State take that risk.

I share my friends’ concern about Forever Wild and I agree with their basic argument, but I do not join them in urging a “No” vote. My political DNA is too deeply imbued with grassroots, democratic activism for me to oppose this opportunity for the people of New York to directly act on the condition of their government. I also recognize that simply convening a constitutional convention does not expose the welfare to the Adirondack Park to unfettered abuse by special interests who would exploit it. No matter the goings on among the delegates to the convention, the people of New York will have the final say in the process, by virtue of their vote on any amendments in November of 2019.

But count me as wary.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Adirondack Colleges Partner on Outdoor Classroom Project

The outdoor classroom on the Saranac Lake campus of North Country Community College, located behind Hodson HallStudents and faculty from North Country Community College and Paul Smith’s College have finished construction of an outdoor classroom at North Country’s Saranac Lake campus.

Located on a hill behind Hodson Hall, the outdoor classroom features a large lean-to and a half-dozen long pine benches. All the timber for the project was cut from Paul Smith’s College property. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Ice Jam Education and Training Workshops Planned

ice jam provided by decIce jams in the Adirondacks are a regular occurrence, disrupting the flow of not only the river, but often the lives and residents and visitors alike.

Ice jam education and training workshops will be held in several locations around New York State from October 16-20. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, October 4, 2017

$500k to Help Wild Center Build Climate Literacy

A $494,000 grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will support The Wild Center as it helps students and teachers in New York City, the Catskills and the Adirondacks respond to climate change in their communities.

The three-year Environmental Literacy Grant is a collaboration of The Wild Center, Cornell Cooperative Extension of Delaware County, the Kurt Hahn Expeditionary Learning School in Brooklyn, and the Alliance for Climate Education (ACE) to build climate literacy and preparedness among students and teachers.

As part of the project, called Convening Young Leaders for Climate Resilience in New York State, high schoolers are expected to learn to assess the effect climate change is likely to have on their communities, work on techniques to convey those impacts to others, and develop the leadership skills needed to shape localized solutions to resiliency challenges posed by the issue. » Continue Reading.


Monday, September 18, 2017

Limited Number Of School Garden Grants Offered

Students at George E. Wilson Elementary School in Hamilton, New Jersey. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Alaska Organic Fertilizer company are offering grants to support school gardens in the United States, excluding it’s territories.

BirdSleuth, Cornell Lab’s K-12 education program, will distribute $25,000 in grants to 20 schools that create or revitalize a garden that supports local wildlife, healthy living, environmental education, and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) learning. Grants range from $500 to $2,000. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Paper Money: Paul Smith’s College Alum Donates $1 Million

John DillonA 1958 graduate and longtime benefactor of Paul Smith’s College has donated $1 million to help the institution renovate its chemistry laboratories. The gift from John Dillon, retired chairman and CEO of International Paper, is the largest donation ever from a Paul Smith’s alum according to school officials.  The renovated labs will be named the John T. Dillon Science Center in his honor, they said.

“John Dillon has been both a leader and steadfast supporter of the college for many years,” Cathy Dove, president of Paul Smith’s College said in an announcement sent to the press. “His career, service as a member of the college’s board of trustees and long history of giving are inspiring. We are so grateful to John for all he has done to support Paul Smith’s College and its great mission.” » Continue Reading.


Monday, July 31, 2017

Literacy Volunteers Receives International Paper Grant

Mindy Malbon, LV student, Jamie Armstrong, LV tutor, and Marie Despres, LV DirectorLiteracy Volunteers of Essex and Franklin Counties (LVEF) has been awarded a grant of $2,000 by the International Paper Foundation. The grant is expected to be used to underwrite printing costs for the organization’s brochures, annual report, and newsletter.

Literacy Volunteers recruits and trains volunteer tutors to work one-on-one with students. Each tutor attends an accredited training program that gives them the skills to effectively tutor adult students in both basic literacy and English as a Second Language (ESL). LV then matches trained tutors with adult students in need of training in math, reading, ESL, digital literacy, or help with obtaining a High School Equivalency (HSE) qualification. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 20, 2017

High Peaks Overuse: Make Cascade an Educational Asset

Over the past few months Governor Andrew Cuomo has shown his economic love for the Adirondacks by putting his money where his mouth is, pledging $32 million towards an Adirondack Gateway facility at Frontier Town in North Hudson and another $20 million for improvements to the Gore, Whiteface and Mt Van Hoevenberg ski centers.

Seeing as generosity is in the air, I have a proposal:  let’s take a small portion of the monetary love intended for these projects and turn Cascade Mountain from a dangerous and degraded poster child for Adirondack overuse to a model of Wilderness education that becomes an asset in the struggle to protect the High Peaks. » Continue Reading.


Monday, June 5, 2017

BT3 Alliance To Host Annual Meeting June 20th

The Adirondack Birth to Three Alliance’s (BT3) annual meeting will bring together educators, providers, government, nonprofits, and businesses to network, quickly review progress to date, and consider strategies to support services for families with young children across the region.

The annual meeting’s theme is Early Childhood Systems Building and will take Tuesday, June 20, at the Crowne Plaza in Lake Placid. The day will begin at 9:30 am with networking and a light breakfast; the meeting will conclude with lunch at 12:30 pm. » Continue Reading.


Monday, May 22, 2017

¡Naturalmente! Summer Program Combines Nature and Spanish

Cultural and natural sustainability will come together in a weeklong program for youth at the Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb. ¡Naturalmente! is a unique program for youth ages 10-14 that provides the opportunity to learn Spanish while exploring the beauty of the Adirondack Park. The program runs from August 20 to 25, 2017.

¡Naturalmente! has two components: Spanish lessons and exploration of the area’s environment. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 11, 2017

Ticonderoga Historical Society Launching Steamboat Education Project

The Ticonderoga Historical Society has been awarded a $5,000 Corridor of Commerce Grant from the Champlain Valley National Heritage Partnership. The grant will fund the creation of a website and student writing competition to commemorate the 200th anniversary of steamboat operations in the Champlain Valley and surrounding area.

While the specific website content is under development, it’s expected to include archival materials that provide students and other viewers with a record of the travels and culture of steamboats as well as related vessels and operators that interacted with steamboats. » Continue Reading.


Monday, April 24, 2017

Fort Ticonderoga Brings Education Onto Lake Champlain

Students aboard CarillonFort Ticonderoga recently received a grant from the South Lake Champlain Fund of the Vermont Community Foundation to support regional youth maritime educational programs. Aboard the 60-foot touring Carillon, each 90-minute narrated boat tour focuses on the historical importance of the Lake Champlain waterway through centuries of history, and highlights elements of geography, natural history, and lake stewardship. This experience enables students to better grasp the strategic importance of the Champlain-Hudson corridor in the 18th century and its role in the founding of America. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 6, 2017

Franklin County Girl Wins NYS Guernsey Award

Adyson Miller wins guernsey calfCornell Cooperative Extension Franklin County has announced Adyson Miller as the winner of the 2017 New York State Guernsey Calf Scholarship Program. The Calf Scholarship Award Program is sponsored by the New York State Guernsey Breeders Association for the purpose of encouraging those who do not presently own Guernseys to become involved with the Guernsey Breed. A purebred Guernsey Calf goes to the candidate who shows interest in the Guernsey breed and who has demonstrated the capabilities of developing the animal to its fullest potential.

Adyson was selected as the winner of the calf by a committee among more than 30 applicants. The application process requires applicants to submit an essay answering a series of questions designed to assist the selection committee on awarding a winner that ensures the safe placement of calf, has the ability and means to care for the animal, and positively promotes the Guernsey breed. » Continue Reading.


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