Posts Tagged ‘fishing’

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Angler Ticketed Scamming Great Sacandaga Fishing Derby

northern pike being kept alive and stored in the iceAccording to a press release issued by the Department of Environmental Conservation, on February 15, Environmental Conservation Officers (ECOs) Jason Hilliard and Robert Higgins conducted a night patrol prior to the start of the Great Sacandaga Lake (GSL) Fisheries derby and the Walleye Challenge.

The ECOs reported that they located tip-ups that had been left out overnight unoccupied, a violation of Environmental Conservation Law. The officers say they also found a 32-inch northern pike being kept alive and stored in the ice next to an unoccupied fishing shanty. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, February 20, 2019

My First Trout and The Rainmakers

My advice to nine-year-old wanna-be trout anglers is: “Do not wear a sweater.” Repeat: “Do not wear a sweater.”

My earliest trout fishing days in and around Bakers Mills in today’s Siamese Ponds Wilderness Area were frustrating because my own fishhook invariably caught mainly my sweater. And we mostly used night crawlers not artificial flies then. Better to wear something less adept at snagging stray hooks. Try thick vinyl, maybe. » Continue Reading.


Friday, February 15, 2019

New York State Free Fishing Weekend Feb 16-17

ice fisherman DEC reminds anglers that February 16-17, 2019 is a free fishing weekend in New York. During this period, anyone can fish without the requirement to obtain a New York State fishing license. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, January 24, 2019

Hardwater Anglers and 40 Degrees: Put Safety First

DEC logoNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is reminding anglers to be cautious when ice fishing.

After 1 to 2 feet of snow fell over most of the Adirondacks Saturday and Sunday, on Thursday temperatures reached near 40 in some areas melting ice and leaving slushy ice conditions with large puddles of water on many frozen waterbodies. » Continue Reading.


Monday, December 24, 2018

DEC: Put Safety First When Ice Fishing

ice fishingThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is encouraging anglers to put safety first when ice fishing. Four inches of solid ice is usually safe for anglers accessing ice on foot. However, ice thickness can vary on waterbodies and even within the same waterbody.

Anglers should be particularly wary of areas of moving water and around boat docks and houses where bubblers may be installed to reduce ice buildup. The presence of snowmobile tracks or footprints on the ice should not be taken as evidence of safe ice conditions. DEC strongly encourages individuals to check ice conditions and avoid situations that appear to present even a remote risk. Testing the thickness of ice can easily be done with an auger or ice spud at various spots as you cross. » Continue Reading.


Friday, November 30, 2018

Featured Hike: Clements Pond, Keene

clements pond trailClements Pond, part of the Wilmington Wild Forest, can be reached on a 1.5-mile lightly trafficked trail which ascends about 650 feet before dropping down to this scenic pond with nearby Clement Mountain rising 900 feet above it. The pond is stocked with brook trout and has a surface area of 2.6 acres. » Continue Reading.


Friday, November 9, 2018

Last Free Fishing Day of 2018 On Sunday

Each year the New York State (NYS) Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) offers four opportunities to test New York’s fishing waters for free. No fishing license is required and it’s a wonderful opportunity to give the sport of fishing a chance.

Fishing is a spiritual journey for some and an obsession for others. My husband grew up fishing and shares that love with both our children. My son likes the competition while my daughter likes any opportunity to best her brother. Keep in mind that children always fish for free in New York State until fifteen years of age. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, November 8, 2018

Free Fishing Throughout New York Veterans Day, Nov 11

Free Fishing DayThe Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has reminded anglers that in celebration of Veteran’s Day, November 11, 2018 residents and non-residents can enjoy a day of freshwater fishing in New York without the requirement of a fishing license. » Continue Reading.


Friday, September 28, 2018

Featured Hike: Rock Lake Trail, Blue Mountain Lake

rock lake trailRock Lake Trail, part of the Blue Mountain Wild Forest, extends 0.8 miles from the trailhead on State Route 28/30 to the shore of Rock Lake, dropping only 80 feet in elevation in that distance. Rock Lake is not only scenic, but provides paddling and fishing opportunities as well. The lake contains brook trout, smallmouth bass, and panfish. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, September 27, 2018

Current Adirondack Outdoor Recreation Conditions (Sept 27)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled each Thursday afternoon and fully updated by Friday afternoon.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Add a comment below, or send your observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com.

Learn and practice the seven Leave No Trace principles. Carry out what you have carried in. Do not leave gear, food, or other items at lean-tos and campsites. Do not litter. Take the free online Leave No Trace course here.

BE PREPARED! Start slow, gain experience. Always carry proper safety equipment – including plenty of food, water, flashlights, space blanket, emergency whistle, first aid kit, fire making tools, extra clothing layers and socks, and a map and compass – inform someone of your itinerary, and be prepared to spend an unplanned night in the woods in cold temperatures. Just before entering the backcountry or launching a boat check the National Weather Service watches, warnings, and advisories here. Follow Adirondack weather forecasts at Burlington and Albany and consult the High Elevation, Recreation, or Lake Champlain forecasts.

SEPTEMBER 27, 2018 – SPECIAL NOTICES » Continue Reading.


Thursday, September 20, 2018

Current Adirondack Outdoor Recreation Conditions (Sept 20)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled each Thursday afternoon and fully updated by Friday afternoon.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Add a comment below, or send your observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com.

Learn and practice the seven Leave No Trace principles. Carry out what you have carried in. Do not leave gear, food, or other items at lean-tos and campsites. Do not litter. Take the free online Leave No Trace course here.

BE PREPARED! Start slow, gain experience. Always carry proper safety equipment – including plenty of food, water, flashlights, space blanket, emergency whistle, first aid kit, fire making tools, extra clothing layers and socks, and a map and compass – inform someone of your itinerary, and be prepared to spend an unplanned night in the woods in cold temperatures. Just before entering the backcountry or launching a boat check the National Weather Service watches, warnings, and advisories here. Follow Adirondack weather forecasts at Burlington and Albany and consult the High Elevation, Recreation, or Lake Champlain forecasts.

SEPTEMBER 20, 2018 – SPECIAL NOTICES » Continue Reading.


Monday, September 17, 2018

A Perfect Storm of Bad Luck; One Tough Guy on Black Lake

A front-runner for 1930s “it seemed like a good idea at the time” award was 40-year-old Harry Baxter of Syracuse. In early September, he and his wife, Louisa, and one of their sons were camping at Black Lake in western St. Lawrence County. Thirty-six hours later he was in desperate straits, clinging to a small, rocky island and life itself.

Harry’s troubles resulted from a series of questionable choices. The first was fishing from a small boat in conditions that Baxter himself later described as heavy seas. The second was going alone, perhaps not the best idea, and the third was where he chose to fish — after all, alone and in stormy waters, where else to set up but near the center of the lake, which spans more than two miles at its widest point.

Because the water was quite rough, he anchored both ends of the boat, enabling him to stay in one spot to fish. While it seemed like a good idea at the time, it also prevented the boat from moving with the water, thus making capsizing much more likely from wave action and water splashing into the boat. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 12, 2018

South Bay Angler Lands State Record Gar

Michael Gatus with the 14 lb. 10 oz. longnose gar he caught from Lake Champlain, Washington County on August 18, 2018.New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has announced that a new state record fish – the third this year – was caught in August, breaking a longstanding record for longnose gar.

Michael Gatus, of Hoosick Falls, caught a 14 lb., 10 oz., longnose gar from the South bay of Lake Champlain in Washington County on Aug. 18 using chunk bait. The catch broke the 1999 New York State record by more than 1½ pounds.

Gatus was actually fishing for channel catfish when he bested the state record. » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 6, 2018

Featured Waters: Lake Lila in Long Lake

Lake Lila is found entirely within the William C. Whitney Wilderness area and is located west of the Village of Long Lake.

This remote lake has both excellent warm and cold-water fishing. Lake Lila is a large, windswept wilderness lake where motor use is prohibited. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, June 30, 2018

Angling Tips: Help Trout and Salmon Beat the Heat

brown troutThis spring, trout and trout anglers have benefited from abundant rainfall and cool weather conditions that promote the growth and survival of trout and salmon. However, with the forecast for high temperatures this weekend through next week, it is important to remember that trout and salmon are coldwater sportfish that can experience serious physical stress whenever water temperatures climb above 70° Fahrenheit. Heat stressed fish often seek pockets of cold water created by upwelling groundwater, small feeder streams, or water released from deep reservoirs. These refuges allow trout to avoid or recover from potentially fatal levels of heat stress. » Continue Reading.