Posts Tagged ‘fishing’

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Winter Lingers: Current Adirondack Conditions (Apr 19)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled each Thursday afternoon.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Add a comment below, or send your observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com.

Practice Leave No Trace Principles when visiting the Adirondack Park.

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND
» Continue Reading.


Friday, April 6, 2018

Adirondack Fish Hatchery Springtime Visits

Though trout and salmon season may have opened on April 1st, the fluctuating temperatures have not made anyone in my family interested in early season angling. Though fishing may not be on my children’s agenda, a visit to the Adirondack Hatchery is always a springtime tradition. Each of the 12 DEC operated fish hatcheries raise specific species of fish, with the Lake Clear hatchery’s specialty being landlocked Atlantic salmon. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 31, 2018

A Fence Full of Car Parts in Baker’s Mills

Paul Schaefer c. 1960The late Adirondack wilderness advocate and conservation leader Paul Schaefer (1908-1996) had loads of stories to tell about his life and the people he came to know in the Adirondacks.

Now that Adirondack rivers are starting to flow again and trout season is about to open, it may be an appropriate time to relay one Paul told me at his fireside. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 29, 2018

2018 Trout Fishing Season Opens Sunday

Fly Fishing on the Ausable River - photo by John WarrenNew York’s 2018 trout fishing season kicks off Sunday, April 1st.

This year DEC is expected to stock 2.26 million catchable-size trout in 315 lakes and ponds and roughly 2,845 miles of streams across the state.

It’s estimated about 647,000 anglers fish for trout in New York State. Fishing conditions are currently less than optimal in the Adirondacks, though ice and deep snow is beginning to melt and conditions will improve as the weather warms. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Invasive Alewife Spreading In Champlain Basin

alewife

Recently, an avid angler noticed an odd fish in his bait bucket and reported it to the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department.

The species was identified as a mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis) and the Department took quick action to locate the baitfish dealer, dispose of the non-native fish, and ensure that no more shipments from the baitfish supplier were allowed to enter the State. » Continue Reading.


Monday, January 1, 2018

Statewide Freshwater Angler Survey Set For January

Fly Fishing on the Ausable River - photo by John WarrenThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) have announced that anglers who purchased a freshwater fishing license between during 2017, may be asked to participate in a survey this January designed to learn more about their angling behaviors, preferences, and opinions on fisheries management issues. The survey was last conducted in 2007.

According to a statement sent to the press by DEC, the survey “is designed to help DEC fisheries managers better understand where anglers are fishing, what they are fishing for, how many days they spend on the water, and what they spend their money on. It also provides managers with insight into anglers’ preferences, satisfaction, and opinions on management topics. Expenditure information provided by anglers will also help DEC better quantify the benefits of freshwater fisheries with respect to the New York State economy.” » Continue Reading.


Friday, September 22, 2017

NYS Free Fishing Day September 23rd

fall salmon river anglersResidents and non-residents of New York State can enjoy a day of free fishing as part of the National Hunting and Fishing Day celebration in New York. September 23 is one of the four new free fishing days that have been added by the state. On that day, anyone can fish for free on any of the freshwaters of NYS without the necessity of a fishing license.

The cooling waters of fall provide some of the best fishing in New York as fish begin to feed more actively prior to cold weather, or head up streams and rivers to spawn. » Continue Reading.


Monday, September 18, 2017

Plattsburgh Meeting on Trout Stream Management Planned

Fly Fishing on the Ausable River - photo by John WarrenThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that it is holding a public meeting on September 26, 2017, at the Town of Plattsburgh Town Hall at 7 pm as part of a series of meetings on trout stream management.

DEC Region 5 Fisheries staff will provide a 30-minute presentation describing DEC’s current trout stream management and key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015. Trout stream anglers and others will have an opportunity after the presentation to provide comments regarding their preferences and expectations for the management of trout streams. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, September 16, 2017

Cornell’s History of Protecting Adirondack Fisheries

2016 Cornell Adirondack Fisheries Research Program Boat CrewI recently wrote about the impacts of acid rain, which results from burning fossil fuels, on Adirondack lakes and streams. But, did you know that Cornell University has been a leader in efforts to safeguard natural fisheries within the Adirondacks and to protect them from the damaging effects of acid rain, invasive species, and climate change for well-over half-a-century?

In fact, Cornell’s cold-water fishery research has historically focused on the Adirondack region. And just last year, the New York State College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell University (CALS) established a new faculty fellowship in fisheries and aquatic sciences, named for the late (and extremely-well-respected) Professor of Fishery Biology, Dr. Dwight A. Webster; the educator who laid the groundwork for what is now the Adirondack Fishery Research Program (AFRP). » Continue Reading.


Saturday, September 16, 2017

Cat Ponds: A Brook Trout Story

Fall fingerling growth rateIn July 1950, I had my first fishing experience on a cold, spring-fed brook that meandered down from the hills near Great Barrington, Massachusetts. My parents and I had planned a break from the heat and crowding of our small Brooklyn apartment and would be staying for a week with their friends.

My eighth birthday was coming up in September, but I was presented with an early present before we left, a child’s fishing outfit that contained a stiff little metal rod and miniature reel, a selection of snelled hooks and split-shot sinkers, a pencil bobber, and some “flies,” which should have been used to adorn some lucky woman’s hat. All of it came packed in a metal tube with carrying handle, clearly stamped “Made in Occupied Japan.” I was delighted and couldn’t wait to use my new tackle!

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 31, 2017

DEC Announces Public Meetings On Trout Stream Management

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that public meetings will be held in each DEC region this fall to provide an overview of the state’s approach to trout stream management.

The meetings will also elicit feedback from trout stream anglers regarding their preferences and expectations for the management of these waters. » Continue Reading.


Friday, August 18, 2017

Angler Catches Massive Freshwater Drum

Jason Bair with the 36 lb drum he caught on Oneida LakeThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that Jason Bair of Macedon, Wayne County, reeled in a state record-breaking freshwater drum from Oneida Lake, Oneida County. Caught on June 16, and weighing in at 36 pounds, the new record drum surpassed the previous state record set in 2016 by more than 6 pounds.

Bair’s freshwater drum marks the fourth state record drum caught since 2005. While records for other more common sportfish have remained unbroken for years. In its announcement of the new record, DEC stated: “it appears that drum are growing to much larger sizes than they ever have in many New York waters. This growth is likely due to their ability to effectively forage on the abundant invasive quagga and/or zebra mussels found in these waters.” » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 13, 2017

DEC Conducting Survey of Freshwater Anglers

DEC will be conducting a survey of licensed anglers who fished New York waters in 2017. This survey will be conducted primarily online and participants with valid e-mail addresses will be selected at random from their sporting license database. If you have not already provided your e-mail address when you purchased your license and want to be considered for the survey, e-mail DEC your name, fishing license ID # and e-mail address.


Saturday, June 10, 2017

Lake Sturgeon Recovery Efforts Show Signs of Success

lake sturgeonThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is asking anglers to avoid spawning lake sturgeon in New York’s waters.  Lake sturgeon are New York’s largest freshwater fish and can grow up to seven feet long and weigh more than 200 pounds.  They are listed as a threatened species in New York

Typically during this time of year, DEC receives multiple reports of lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) caught by anglers fishing for walleye and other species. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Historic Firsts: Aerial Fish Stocking Of Adirondack Waters

DE HartnettAs the once seemingly endless supply of Adirondack brook trout declined from over-fishing in the late nineteenth century, sportsmen’s clubs turned to fish stocking in an attempt to keep fishing at accustomed levels. Seth Green established what is believed to be the first commercial fish hatchery in the western hemisphere at Caledonia near Rochester in 1864. Green was among those who strongly advocated for New York to engage in fishing regulation and fish stocking. The state established a stocking program in 1868. Green himself brought fish from his hatchery to the Fulton Chain in January 1872. This was probably the first recorded instance of Adirondack fish stocking and incidentally marked the introduction of smallmouth bass into Adirondack waters.

Thus began what a 1981 DEC report on fisheries called a “near maniacal” program of fish stocking in the Adirondacks. New York acquired Green’s hatchery in 1875, then began to construct hatcheries throughout the state. The Saranac hatchery was completed in 1885. The Cold Spring hatchery on Fourth Lake was constructed later the same year. In 1887 the Cold Spring hatchery was relocated to Old Forge just below the dam. At first native trout roe were collected and raised to fingerlings in the hatcheries. As time passed native fish were supplemented with brown and rainbow trout as well as a host of other non-native species. » Continue Reading.


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