Posts Tagged ‘Fort Ticonderoga’

Sunday, April 5, 2020

Fort Ti aims to ‘fortify’ with digital programming

Center of Digital HistoryOn June 26, 1176, John Adams wrote to Abigail words appropriate for our present circumstances:

Our Misfortunes in Canada, are enough to melt a Heart of Stone. The Small Pox is ten times more terrible than Britons, Canadians and Indians together. This was the Cause of our precipitate Retreat from Quebec, this the Cause of our Disgraces at the Cedars.-I dont mean that this was all. There has been Want, approaching to Famine, as well as Pestilence. And these Discouragements seem to have so disheartened our Officers, that none of them seem to Act with Prudence and Firmness.
But these Reverses of Fortune dont discourage me. It was natural to expect them, and We ought to be prepared in our Minds for greater Changes, and more melancholly Scenes still. It is an animating Cause, and brave Spirits are not subdued with Difficulties.”

Beth L Hill,  President & CEO of Fort Ticonderoga, is taking inspiration from this letter.  The Fort is unveiling an online initiative to “Fortify Yourself” through digital educational programs, videos, and social media engagement. As well as access to an extensive virtual vault of rare museum collections. Visit their Center of Digital History to explore.


Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Eve of the Revolution: 1775 British Garrison Event

1775 British Garrison Living History EventFort Ticonderoga has announced a one-day living history event where re-enactors will tell the story of the British garrison at Ticonderoga in February 1775, just three months before the Americans captured the fort and claimed one of America’s first victories in the American Revolution. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Fort Ticonderoga’s Beaty Family Scholarship

Beaty Family Scholarship winner Cole SiebelsThe Beaty Family Scholarship will be awarded to a local student during this year’s North Country History Day, hosted at Fort Ticonderoga on March 7th.

The award is for an outstanding Senior Division entry that exemplifies the spirit of National History Day. The winner will receive a scholarship to attend the National History Academy during the summer of 2020. » Continue Reading.


Monday, January 13, 2020

Coming Campaign at Fort Ticonderoga

Preparing for the Coming CampaignFort Ticonderoga has announced their next Winter Quarters living history event, Preparing for the Coming Campaign has been set for Saturday, January 18, 2020. The event will bring to life the story of American soldiers at Ticonderoga in the year 1777 as they prepare for a British attack.

A featured one-day display will highlight tools recovered from the historic landscape. These tools were used by soldiers to cut, chisel, file, crack, break, and dig to create the fortifications that defined the warfare of the 18th century. Fort Ticonderoga holds one of the largest collections of its kind in North America. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, December 4, 2019

Lake Champlain ‘Pavilion’ Gets Restoration, Reuse Funds

Pavilion Restoration ProjectThe Pavilion is a National Historic Landmark house located near Lake Champlain on the grounds of Fort Ticonderoga.

It was built in the late 1820s for William Ferris Pell and later used as a hotel, which hosted the likes of Robert Todd Lincoln, William Howard Taft and suffragist Alice Paul.  Fort Ticonderoga Museum founders Sarah and Stephen Pell restored the Pavilion in 1909. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 27, 2019

Henry Knox’s ‘Noble Train’ of Artillery At Fort Ti

Fort Ticonderoga courtesy Carl Heilman IIWhen men under Benedict Arnold and Ethan Allen captured Fort Ticonderoga and Fort Crown Point in 1775, they also captured over 180 cannon, and other weaponry and supplies.

Beginning in November 1775, Colonel Henry Knox and a team of engineers used sledges to haul 60 tons of this heavy artillery to Cambridge and the Siege of Boston. Many of those cannon were larger than what was available to Patriot forces, and they were placed on higher ground around the city.  Americans began to bombard the city on the night of March 2, 1776, the British responded with their own bombardment, and for two days the cannon fire rained into Boston.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, November 17, 2019

Fort Ticonderoga Launches New Season of Programs

living history eventFort Ticonderoga has announced a new schedule of programs during its Winter Quarters season. From now through April, visitors can enjoy exciting living history events, engaging seminars, specialty programs, behind-the-scenes VIP Tours, and hands-on workshops.

Guests can now explore Fort Ticonderoga during what was traditionally the “Winter Quarters” season for armies of the 18th century. Groups of 15 or more are welcome to schedule a visit to have the entire property to themselves and a dedicated historic interpreter for a group tour. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Fall Fun at Fort Ticonderoga

maze by moonlight provided by fort ticonderogaFort Ticonderoga has announced their annual Maze by Moonlight, and the living history event “Nothing Could Exceed the Spirit and Alertness,” set for October 25th and 26th, and October 26th and 27th.

The new 2019 corn maze design features clues connected to Fort Ticonderoga’s story. The maze is divided into two phases, giving guests the chance to gain confidence in the smaller maze before tackling the main maze. The average journey takes about twenty minutes for the first phase, and up to an hour for the second phase. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, October 20, 2019

Fort Ticonderoga Gets Grant To Restore Historic Walls

Fort Ticonderoga courtesy Carl Heilman IIFort Ticonderoga, a premiere historic and travel destination, has been awarded the Save America’s Treasures Grant, funded by the Historic Preservation Fund and administered by the National Park Service, Department of Interior through a competitive process.

The property was awarded $465,000 to be utilized in the restoration of the north demi-lune, a stone defensive structure connected to the fort. Originally constructed in the 18th century, the north demi-lune was used to defend Fort Ticonderoga against invaders and was part of the fort’s outer defenses that Ethan Allen and Benedict Arnold saw as they crossed Lake Champlain on their journey to capture the fort in May of 1775 during the American Revolution. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, October 15, 2019

British Engineer Charles Terrot At Fort Ti, Valcour Island

original commission of Charles Terrot

Charles Terrot was a British officer who served with the British Army in Canada during the Revolutionary War, and left one of the best accounts of the Battle of Valcour Island.

Terrot was commissioned in 1774 as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Royal Regiment of Artillery at the age of 16 after studying at the Royal Military Academy in Woolwich. He advanced with the British Army against the Americans in 1776. Fort Ticonderoga holds some of the letters Terrot sent back home, including one written following the battle, in which he includes a map of the pivotal engagement and drawings of the American ships.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, October 3, 2019

Early American History Collections At Fort Ticonderoga

Erin Benz provided by fort ticonderogaFort Ticonderoga holds one of North America’s largest collections of military material culture, covering the colonization of North America and the ensuing colonial conflicts, the Seven Years’ War (a.k.a. French & Indian War), the American Revolution, and the War of 1812.

The collection includes rare books, manuscripts, weaponry, accoutrements, textiles, uniforms, headgear, paintings, prints, maps, ephemera, personal effects from across the Atlantic World and a complementary archeological collection consisting of tens of thousands of artifacts recovered from the grounds of Fort Ticonderoga in the 20th century. » Continue Reading.


Monday, September 30, 2019

Heritage, Harvest, & Horse Festival at Fort Ti

Heritage Harvest Horse FestivalFort Ticonderoga is set to host a Heritage, Harvest & Horse Festival on October 5th. The full day of autumn fun will be set in the midst of the King’s Garden heirloom apple trees and a landscape of mountains and Lake Champlain.

Guests are invited to discover the historical importance of horses and other working animals during demonstrations; meet friendly farm animals; stroll through Fort Ticonderoga’s farmers’ market featuring local food, beverages, and crafts; participate in family fun activities; and tackle the six-acre Heroic Corn Maze. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Brown’s Raid On Ticonderoga in Context

cannon aimed at Fort Ticonderoga from Mount Defiance provided by the Lake George MirrorDuring the French and Indian Wars, control of Lake George could determine control of the North American continent.

During the War of Independence, not so much. The lake was a relatively placid place as veterans who had won land grants for service during the war with France took up residence and began to cultivate the hillsides. Barges rather than bateaux passed down the lake, winning barely a glance from the grazing cattle. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Rare Native American Militaria On Exhibit at Fort Ti

Fort Ticonderoga courtesy Carl Heilman IIRare Native American artifacts are on display at Fort Ticonderoga in the exhibition “The Art of Resistance: Selections from the Robert N. Nittolo Collection” for a limited time only through October 2019.

These items have never been put on view before, and are from the Robert Nittolo collection, considered among the most significant private collections of 18th century militaria. » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 26, 2019

A Hike Into History Recalls British Occupation of Ticonderoga

mount independenceMount Independence is located in Vermont, just across Lake Champlain from Fort Ticonderoga, for which it was a critical base of operations. It can easily be reached by the Ticonderoga Ferry, and offers a great way to hike into history.

“The Mount” was built in 1776 and 1777 by the Continental Army following their capture of Fort Ticonderoga in 1775. A bridge was built to connect the cantonment on Mount Independence (and the road to Castleton) to Fort Ticonderoga on the New York side of the lake. Over 400 yards long, with more than 20 piers with 12 foot wide floating pontoons between them, the bridge allowed troops camped at Mount Independence easy access to the Fort Ticonderoga. » Continue Reading.