Posts Tagged ‘Franklin County CCE 4-H Horse Program’

Thursday, August 4, 2022

Learn About 4-H at the Franklin County Fair

The 172nd Annual Franklin County Fair (frcofair.com) kicks off on Sunday, August 7th, with poultry judging, horses in place, Holstein and red and white cattle in place, and a demolition derby. It will conclude on Sunday, August 14, with an open beef show and tractor pulls. You can take a spin on the Tilt-a-Whirl or a ride on the Ferris Wheel, enjoy some fried dough, and take in a Monster Truck Show (Aug. 10), a demolition derby (Aug. 11), or a concert by Rodney Atkins and Tracy Byrd (Aug. 12th) or Walker Hayes and Tigirlily (Aug. 13).  

It’s also an opportunity to learn about or show your support for 4-H, America’s largest youth development organization. 4-H is almost certainly the most highly recognized of all Cooperative Extension programs. And the Franklin County Fair has a long and rich tradition of supporting 4-H programs and 4-H youth. For more than a century, the Fair has been a place for 4-H members to come together to showcase their skills, craftsmanship, showmanship, and their animals. The Fair isn’t actually a part of the 4-H program and Cornell Cooperative Extension and the Fair Board are not directly related. But both organizations have been cooperating for generations to assure continued success.

Friday, April 15, 2022

If You Want to Help a Horse

April 26 is National Help a Horse Day; an initiative launched in 2013 by the American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) to create and raise awareness of ways to take better care of these often-beloved animals and to promote protection of neglected and abused horses across the country.

I can think of no animal more valued or respected than the horse. Nor can I think of one that has had greater influence on civilization. Horses were among the first animals to be tamed and broken. And, without question, the domestication of horses transformed the world.

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