Posts Tagged ‘Gardening’

Monday, October 11, 2021

When it comes to permaculture, we have a lot to learn

permaculture gardenI’ve never been fond of buzzwords. “Organic,” “Natural,” and “Sustainable” lost their foothold in reality decades ago when they were co-opted as marketing labels. Corporate buzzwords, cynical and empty, are often buzz-phrases anyway: “Whole-Systems Thinking,” “Trickle Down,” “Customer Journey.”

In my view, “Permaculture” has been teetering on the edge of irrelevance for some time.  Just look how it’s described in Wikipedia, which can usually be trusted for succinct and reasonably cogent (if not entirely accurate) definitions: “Permaculture is an approach to land management that adopts arrangements observed in flourishing ecosystems, and includes a set of design principles derived using whole-systems thinking.” Wait a minute – whole-systems thinking? I’ve heard that somewhere.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, October 2, 2021

MAKE IT: Herbed Gardening Salve

herb salveI love permaculture, and have a spiral herb garden in which I grow some plants which have traditionally been used for medicine, along with a handful of culinary herbs. I also wildcraft other plants that I use medicinally. For this salve, I use a combination of wildcrafted and cultivated plants. However, many of these plants can also be purchased if you cannot find your own. Use whenever your hands need a little extra care! » Continue Reading.


Kid next to water
Tuesday, September 21, 2021

A More Sustainable September

Master Gardeners working at Eastside Center in Glens FallsSeptember days traditionally mark a goodbye to summer as warm nights wane and are replaced with the cool mornings and falling leaves of autumn’s approach. As we wave a “see you next year” to summer, many opportunities await us in the month ahead for a more sustainable September.

  • Swap or borrow: Need something for school or a tool for a fall project? Before buying new, check with family, friends, neighbors, or community groups to see if they have what you’re looking for. Swapping or borrowing saves money and can help keep items that have already been purchased in use longer.
  • Go secondhand in September: Whether you’re searching for furniture, sports equipment, or on the lookout for a new outfit, great finds in good condition are out there through shopping secondhand at thrift stores, garage sales, or even through online community marketplaces. Shopping secondhand can be more affordable and helps extend the life of an item or product.
  • Share garden extras: Do you have a garden that produced more than you can eat? Don’t let it go to waste! Share what you can with coworkers, neighbors, and family. Still have too much? Check out some recipes to cook up what you’ve got, including the scraps! You can also look into donating to a food pantry or other similar food assistance program, but be sure to call ahead to check what is currently being accepted.
  • Plant native: Fall is a popular time for landscaping projects. Choose plants that are native to your area.

Recycle Right: Make sure recycling bins at home, work, and school have signage that helps everyone recycle right. Find out what can and cannot go in your recycling bin by checking your local recycling guidelines.

Looking for more ideas? Visit DEC’s Living the Green Life for tips.


Tuesday, August 10, 2021

High Tunnels can Extend the Growing Season and Enhance High-Value Crop Viability

Putting the finishing touches on a high tunnel Photo Credit: Susan Alman; University of Arkansas

High tunnels, sometimes called hoop houses, offer northern New York market growers an easy way to extend our limited growing season by two or three months. Sometimes more. Farmers can grow early and/or late crops of cool weather and salad vegetables even while there’s snow on the ground. And depending upon the weather, warm season crops, like tomatoes, can mature several weeks earlier and be harvested and sold many weeks after similar field grown crops have been killed by frost.

In addition, high tunnels offer protection from wind, driving rain, disease, insects, and deer. And more than a decade of Cornell University-conducted research has shown that the yields and quality of produce grown in high tunnels can be far superior to that of comparable field-grown crops.

This is great news for consumers too, who gain access to an ever-increasing variety and supply of top-quality, locally-grown fruits and vegetables, both earlier and later in the year.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, July 26, 2021

TAUNY Garden Tour at Jane Desotelle’s ‘Plattsburgh Botanical Sanctuary’

Jane Desotelle garden tourJoin TAUNY in Plattsburgh for the next Grow and Tell Project garden tour of the season. The Grow and Tell Project is a 2021 partnership between TAUNY and littleGrasse Community Farm (Canton, NY), highlighting the local food and food traditions that help sustain us, through a series of garden tours, kitchen demonstrations, video and digital features, and more.

The second in the summer series, this garden tour brings us to Jane Desotelle’s “Plattsburgh Botanical Sanctuary” (Plattsburgh, NY), where Jane will show visitors the garden and share stories of how the things she grows and forages both connect her to her heritage and offer tasty flavors and medicinal properties for living a healthful and delicious life.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, April 26, 2021

Hey bugs! Fear This!

colorado potato beetleNo offense, but Franklin D. Roosevelt should maybe bug off with his assertion that “…the only thing we have to fear is fear itself,” because fear is good for gardeners and farmers.

According to entomologists Nicholas Aflitto and Jennifer Thaler of the Cornell University-based New York State Integrated Pest Management Program (NYSPIM), it can be harnessed as a weapon against destructive pests. Turns out it’s possible to scare harmful insects out of gardens and crop fields.

Ascribing human feelings to bugs may be a stretch, but if something makes the critters run away and hide, it seems fair, not to mention simple, to call that fear instead of “a consistent generalized avoidance response in reaction to certain stimuli” or some such thing. After all, it took biologists a few hundred years to establish that various animals from elephants to birds and turtles really and truly play, and for no other reason than to have fun. Perhaps one day we’ll figure out that invertebrates have emotional lives, too. I suppose that might raise ethical issues around pest control, but let’s not go there just yet.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 24, 2021

Gearing up for gardening

cilantro

Will the pandemic home gardening trend continue?

If you weren’t a gardener before, the COVID-19 pandemic may have inspired you to start a veggie garden. Johnny’s Selected Seeds in Fairfield, Maine, saw a 270% jump in orders the week the coronavirus pandemic was declared a national emergency. Many local nurseries sold out of vegetable transplants fast last spring, citing they couldn’t keep up with demand.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, May 29, 2020

The Adirondack Pollinator Project: 2020 Plant Sale

AdkAction’s Adirondack Pollinator Project will be offering its annual “Pollinator Plant” sale again to help the hummingbirds, butterflies and bee population.

They have teamed up with Cook & Gardener Nursery and chose plants that can thrive in the Adirondacks. The plants offered have been sourced or grown from seeds to ensure no contact with neonicotinoids (a class of insecticides harmful to pollinators) and will help efforts to rebuild the monarch butterfly population, attract hummingbirds, and reinforce the native bee and moth population.

Plant orders are available online until June 15,  or while supplies last.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 11, 2020

Vermicomposting: Making Black Gold

Vermicomposting uses worms to decompose waste courtesy Wikimedia user ChristopheFinotVermicomposting is the process of using worms to digest food waste to produce a nutrient and microbe rich soil amendment known as vermicompost (vermi – being latin for worm).

This compost is sometimes referred to as “black gold” because when mixed into the soil, it’s extremely valuable to the health and growth of the plants. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, November 19, 2019

American Witch Hazel: A New York Native

American witch-hazel plant by Judy GallagherAs one of the only native plants that blooms in late fall and early winter, American witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana) can be found stealing the forest spotlight right now.

While most of our native bloomers turn in for a long winter’s nap, the streamer-like flowers of this plant are just starting to appear, following the annual loss of the shrub’s leaves. These highly-fragrant yellow blooms typically last into December. » Continue Reading.


Monday, October 7, 2019

10th Annual Garlic Festival Set For Warrensburg

Garlic Festival at the Warrensburgh Riverfront Farmers' MarketTenth Annual Garlic Festival at the Warrensburgh Riverfront Farmers’ Market is set for Friday, October 11th, from 3 to 6 pm.

Certified organic and naturally grown garlic will be sampled and sold for planting and consumption. Horticultural information and recipes will be provided at the CCE of Warren County Master Gardener Station. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, September 15, 2019

Pitcher Plants Turn Food Chain Upside Down

pitcher plant As a kid, I was fascinated and terrified by the idea of carnivorous plants. Growing up in suburban New Jersey, my only exposure to this particular subset of the plant kingdom was the ravenous, larger-than-life Venus fly trap in Little Shop of Horrors.

If I stumbled upon a carnivorous plant in real life, I wondered, would it have teeth? If I ventured too close, would it grab on to my finger and never let go? » Continue Reading.


Thursday, September 12, 2019

Warren Co Master Gardener Training to Start

Peter Benoit and Kevin Donovan Master Gardeners working at East Side CenterThe Warren County Master Gardener Training Program has announced they are now accepting applications for 2020 training. The program is open to anyone who has an interest in expanding their gardening experience and knowledge.

The Master Gardener Training Program provides attendees the opportunity to learn how to improve their gardens and landscapes by sharing information with fellow-Master Gardeners during the training, and following the training, by participating in community-based horticultural programs, educational projects and helping people in the community with their gardening questions. » Continue Reading.


Monday, August 5, 2019

Ferns and Mosses Hike Planned Near Split Rock

Naturalist Audrey HysonChamplain Area Trails (CATS) is set to host a hike led by Audrey Hyson, Saturday, August 17, on the Flying Squirrel Trail, between Westport and Essex.

Hyson writes the “Everyday Naturalist” column for Adirondac magazine and is an experienced naturalist. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 4, 2019

Managing Fruit Trees Class Planned

cornell university logoCornell Cooperative Extension has announced a class on managing Fruit Trees has been set for Thursday, August 22nd, from 4 to 6 pm.

Market growers as well as the general public are invited. The class will be led by Michael Basedow, Cornell Cooperative Extension Tree Fruit Specialist with the Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture Program. » Continue Reading.



Kid next to water

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