Posts Tagged ‘Herkimer County’

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Adirondack Scenic Railroad’s Pumpkin Trains

Over the next two weekends, October 13-14 and 20–21 the Adirondack Scenic Railroad will be hosting it’s third annual Pumpkin Train.   The trains will be departing the Thendara (Old Forge) Station at 10 am, 11:15 am, 12:30 pm, 1:45 pm and 3 pm on Saturdays and Sundays rain or shine.

Each train will travel North to the former site of the New York Central’s Carter Station. Along the way children will be on the lookout for ghosts and goblins and have an opportunity to win a jar of candy. At Carter Station, families can leave the train at Wally’s Pumpkin Patch.
» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, September 25, 2012

The Civil War: A Musical Journey

Four Seasons, Four Years is a new Old Songs production featuring eleven singers and musicians from the Adirondacks performing a selection of songs extant in America between 1850 and 1865. This performance takes place at View (the former Old Forge Arts Center) this Saturday, September 29, 2012 at 7:30pm. The show includes both popular songs of the period as well as songs composed in response to the Civil War itself and events leading up to it. The songs are interspersed with historical narrative specific to New York State and the New York Volunteer Regiments. » Continue Reading.


Monday, August 13, 2012

Adirondacks National Exhibition of American Watercolors

Gordon and Mildred Evans Memorial Award WinnerIf you happen into the Adirondack Park, you might find yourself in Old Forge, but probably not. Of a variety of places off the beaten track, Old Forge is probably one of the farthest off. But come here you will, if you have any real interest in art, because this is home to the annual Adirondacks National Exhibition of American Watercolors, one of the 10 top such exhibitions in the country.

The 2012 exhibition starts officially today, with an opening last night that packed the exhibit halls of the state-of-the-art, leeds-certified venue, View, which opened just over a year ago in Old Forge, NY. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 8, 2012

Rock And Rock Tribute Concert In Old Forge

Tickets are still available online for the 2nd Annual Classic Rock Tribute Concert called Forgefest 2012, on the grounds of the George T. Hiltebrant Recreation Center on North Street in Old Forge this Saturday, August 11th from noon until 10pm. The event concludes with a “Rock Fireworks spectacular.”

This year, the $25 admission to Forgefest includes music by internationally known tribute bands performing the work of rock legends from the 70’s and 80’s. Kashmir offers the best of Led Zeppelin, Blaze of Glory tributes the work of Jon Bon Jovi, and returning favorite, Completely Unchained, performs favorites sung by rock heroes, Van Halen. Gates open at noon. The opening set is provided by Wicked, a hot new glam band from the Utica area, followed by CNY favorite, Showtime. Daily raffle drawings are being held through their facebook page: Forgefest.   » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Adk Action Informational Meeting Set for Old Forge

ADK Action will hold an information session and discussion from 5 to 7:30 p.m. this Thursday, July 12 at the Old Forge Library, 220 Crosby Blvd.  ADK Action was founded in the Tri-Lakes area as a non-partisan organization in 2007.  Membership is open to both seasonal and full-time Adirondack residents.

“The issues we tackle are politically neutral, but we believe they are of great importance to the future of the Adirondacks,” said Dave Wolff, the organization’s chair. “Some are economic, such as consistent property assessments, universal access to high-speed broadband, and more shared services among the many government jurisdictions of the Park. Some are environmental, such as water quality and salt pollution. We try to focus our limited resources where we can make a difference and, most importantly, we try to take action and make things happen.” » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 26, 2012

40th Annual Forge Festival of Arts & Crafts

The 40th Annual Forge Festival of Arts and Crafts will be held this weekend, June 30th to July 1st, at the North Street Recreation Center. Hours are Saturday, 9am – 5pm, and Sunday 10am – 4pm.

Over 60 skilled venders that were hand-selected from across five states will be featuring an extensive assortment of hand crafted items. Venders will be offering everything from woodworking and paintings to quilts and candles. Maple syrup, jam, popcorn and old fashion fudge will also be some of the delicious treats available at this year’s Forge Festival of Arts and Crafts. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Dave Gibson: Remembering Harold Jerry

A columnist from the Old Forge area, Mart Allen, recently wrote for the Adirondack Express about the late Harold A. Jerry, Jr., and he inspired me to do the same. Judging from his experiences with Harold along a trap line during the winter in Herkimer County, Mart Allen concluded that Harold Jerry displayed a depth and integrity of character that should be the measure we take of all our fellow human beings, but often isn’t. That observation about Harold rang very true for me. » Continue Reading.


Friday, March 9, 2012

Learning to Cook Adirondack Book, Event

Fourth generation Adirondacker Nancy Pulling Best has written a short book of Adirondack food stories and recipes. Learning to Cook Adirondack recalls the friends and family who taught her to cook and bake. This little book is a treasure of nearly 50 local recipes with profiles of the men and women who contributed them from around the Old Forge region.

Nancy Pulling Best will lead a free lecture on Sunday, March 11, 2012 at View from 1-3 pm at 3273 State Route 28 in Old Forge. Participants will sample recipes from her new cookbook and signed copies will be available for purchase. Call 315.369.6411 for more information or visit www.viewarts.org.

The book can also be purchased online at nancydidit.com in addition to Adirondack book stores.

Note: Books noticed on this site have been provided by the publishers.


Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Sandy Hildreth Visits The View’s Photo Exhibit

On my way through the Adirondacks, while traveling for the holidays, I stopped at View, the Arts Center in Old Forge, to see “Adirondack View Finders: Farb, Battaglia, Bowie, Heilman”. As I walked through the galleries of photos I kept waiting for one to jump out at me – to say “hey, this is new and different – look at me” and it wasn’t happening.

Don’t get me wrong, this is an outstanding exhibition of photographs. Nathan Farb’s work can take your breath away with the incredible details. Nancie Battaglia is exhibiting some striking sepia tone images. Mark Bowie has some low light nighttime exposures with amazing results and Carl Heilman’s panoramas pull you into the space so much you feel like you are right there with him on a mountain summit. All good – but all things I had seen before.

In adjoining galleries there are additional photographs: “Emerging Views,” featuring works by Johnathan A Esper – who sometimes climbs up big white pines to get some wonderful panoramic views; Leslie Dixon and Clark Lubbs, both of whom are showing lovely, intimate views of the natural world.

Finally, there are photos from an exhibit called “Teacher’s Turn: Instructors from the Adirondack Photography Institute.” Another batch of terrific images from Eric Dresser, Joe LeFevre, John Radigan and Carl Rubino. Here is where my inner spirit was moved. We’ve all seen cute bear cub photos, or monster buck images that make you wonder if the photographer was shooting animals contained on a game preserve. Eric Dresser’s photos seem to just take you to the place – you feel like you were stepping softly through the forest and chanced upon these animals without disturbing them. Not overly cute, nor dramatic, just a beautifully composed, captured moments in the life of wild creatures.

However the photos that made me stop and walk back to look at them again were some relatively small images perhaps in the 12×18” size, by John Radigan. Not dramatic, nor extreme in detail or view, but subtle, soft painterly moments in time. In fact they looked more like paintings than photographs – printed on lovely paper with torn edges. I thought they were something like polaroid transfer prints, but after contacting the artist, he explained that “the series of images for the View exhibit were made using an Epson archival inkjet printer on watercolor stock. The image edges were made manually using Photoshop to approximate edge effects like an acid burn, etc. The paper edges are hand torn. The images themselves were captured using various in-camera techniques such as multi-exposure, long exposure blur and image overlay. No computer tricks were used.”

This photography exhibit is definitely worth seeing for it’s breadth, depth, and excellence. And if the opportunity to wander through the Adirondacks via the captured images of all these photographers is not enough, then consider the sixty-eight pieces of native stone sculptures tastefully placed throughout the galleries by Keene Valley artist Matt Horner. Soft, organic forms of hard Adirondack rock! A final bonus is a slide show in an adjoining gallery of Nathan Farb’s striking images of the devastation of Hurricane Irene. Worth seeing as a reminder of the awesome power of nature. The overwhelming response to this natural disaster cleaned things up so quickly it’s easy to forget how bad it really was.

These exhibits will be on display until January 29 at View in Old Forge. Correction: “Adirondack Viewfinders” will remain on exhibit until March 3. Hours are Monday through Thursday, 10 – 4, Friday and Saturday from 10 – 5, and Sunday from noon to 4 pm. Admission is $10/$5 for members. 315-369-6411.


Thursday, December 29, 2011

Famous Murder Case at the Adirondack Museum

The first program of the Adirondack Museum’s 2012 Cabin Fever Sunday series, “Chester Gillette: The Adirondacks’ Most Famous Murder Case” will be held on Sunday, January 15, 2012.

It’s the stuff movies are made of- a secret relationship, a pregnancy and a murder. Over a century after it happened in Big Moose Lake, Herkimer County, the Chester Gillette murder case of 1906 is the murder that will never die. The murder of Grace Brown and the case following was the subject of Theodore Dreiser’s 1925 book An American Tragedy, and the Hollywood movie A Place in the Sun.

The story continues to be told today with a 1999 Opera at the Metropolitan Opera in New York and in a 2011 documentary North Woods Elegy. Author Craig Brandon, considered among the world’s foremost experts on the case, and author of Murder in the Adirondacks, will present and lead a discussion.

Craig Brandon is a national award-winning author of six books of popular history and public affairs and a former award-winning reporter.

Held in the Auditorium, the program will begin at 1:30 p.m. Cabin Fever Sundays are offered at no charge to museum members or children of elementary school age and younger. The fee for non-members is $5.00. The Museum Store and Visitor Center will be open from noon to 4 p.m. For additional information, please call (518) 352-7311, ext. 128 or visit
www.adirondackmuseum.org.


Saturday, December 3, 2011

Louise Gaylord Mystery Set in the Adirondacks

Known for her unexpected twists and well-researched storylines, Louise Gaylord features an Adirondack mystery in Dark Lake (Little Moose Press, 2011), the fourth installment of her nationally acclaimed Allie Armington series.

When asked why the Adirondacks is so special to her, Louise said, “The first time I came up here I hated it. My husband’s brother said we were going to the club. A club to me meant a place for a dress and heels. They took us out to a camp with no electricity or running water for five days. It was quite a shock and I didn’t want to come back. But then I came back again and again and again, for over 40 years. It became my heart’s home.”

In the new book the brave and intelligent Allie Armington returns after 15 years to her aunt’s cottage retreat in the Adirondack Mountains where she spent most of her childhood summers. She anticipates a happy reunion, but instead finds her Aunt Sallie dead, and a close-knit community trying to portray the tragedy as suicide to keep it out of the news. Allie must clear her aunt’s reputation, navigating her way around a compromised police department, wealthy neighbors with agendas, and a drug conspiracy that gets wackier every second.

Gaylord got the idea for the murder mystery series after spending three months on a grand jury panel in Texas. The series includes three prior novels to Dark Lake, with stories ranging from the Southwest (Anacacho and Spa Deadly) to New York (Xs).

Gaylord’s first Allie Armington Mystery, Anacacho, won the National Benjamin Franklin Award for Best Mystery/Suspense and many other awards. Gaylord divides her time between homes in Houston; Santa Barbara, California; and Old Forge, New York.

Note: Books noticed on this site have been provided by the publishers. Purchases made through this Amazon link help support this site.


Tuesday, November 29, 2011

View Presents Cinderella The Enchanted Edition

The performance of the classic musical “Cinderella The Enchanted Edition” by Rogers and Hammerstein will be performed by the Adirondack Lakes Center for the Arts at View at 3PM on December 3rd.

This timeless enchantment of a magical fairy tale is reborn with the Rodgers & Hammerstein hallmarks of originality, charm and elegance. As adapted for the stage, with great warmth and more than a touch of hilarity, the hearts of children and adults alike soar when the slipper fits. This Enchanted Edition is based on the 1997 teleplay. Adapted for the Stage by Tom Briggs From the Teleplay by Robert L. Freedman.

As a kingdom celebrates its Prince’s decision to give a ball for the express purpose of finding a bride, Cinderella’s two stepsisters and their mother enter. This less-than-lovable trio is followed by what seems to be a large pile of packages, but in fact is Cinderella carrying the ladies’ ball gowns, frills and frou frou from a successful shopping spree. Cinderella, it becomes apparent when they arrive home, will have the formidable job of making the Stepmother and Stepsisters beautiful for the ball—in addition to her other jobs, which include cooking, sewing, cleaning, washing and everything else imaginable. Although she won’t be allowed to go to the ball herself, Cinderella is happy for the others. She always tries to be cheerful and never complains. Sometimes, however, she retreats to her “own little corner” and dreams of a more exciting life.

The Queen and King are not in complete agreement about the Prince’s ball (which should in fact be called the Queen’s ball, since it is entirely her idea). The King doesn’t want to have it at all, since it will be a great deal of trouble, a large expense, and why would a red-blooded boy want to get married in the first place? But the Queen has her heart set on it, and neither the King nor the Prince (who dreads the whole idea) can bear to disappoint her. The preparations continue.

On the night of the ball, Cinderella helps her Stepmother and Stepsisters get ready. After they leave, she sits alone in her corner and imagines what it might be like at the ball. She’s not alone for long, however, for her Godmother appear at the window. Despite this lady’s sensible looks and practical manner, she is no ordinary godmother, though Cinderella doesn’t suspect this. With help from the Godmother’s “fol-de-rol” and “fiddley dee,” Cinderella is magically transformed for the ball. Her carriage, changed from a pumpkin, drawn by horses that were mice a moment before, whisks her to the palace.

The ball is the ball that everyone remembers from their storybooks, and Cinderella is the most beautiful of Princesses. Does she captivate everyone at the palace? She does! Do she and the Prince fall in love? They do! Must she flee at midnight before her carriage changes back into a pumpkin? She must!

Please note that 3pm is the correct time, View apologizes for any confusion. Tickets are $15/$10 members/$5 children under 12 with a paid adult. Please call the View Box Office 315-369-6411 to purchase tickets with a credit card or visit View at 3273 SR 28, Old Forge, NY to purchase them by cash, check or credit card. View is a multi-arts center located at 3273 State Rt. 28 in Old Forge, NY. To learn more about View programming, including other upcoming performances, visit www.ViewArts.org or call 315-369-6411.

Photo: Colleen Pine as Cinderella and Lucas Greer as Prince Christopher.


Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Old Forge Adirondack Photography Exhibit Opens

Nature photography is a naturally booming business in the Adirondacks, where a number of talented photographers have worked to elevate their craft to new levels. Four of the best Adirondack photographers—Nathan Farb, Mark Bowie, Nancie Battaglia, and Carl Heilman—have combined their work for a unique show, Adirondack View Finders, opening December 2nd at View in Old Forge, NY.

The View building itself is a wonderful new LEEDS-approved green venue that hosts events and workshops in a variety of arts and crafts, and offers a special home to the well developed craft of Adirondack photography.

Bowie and Heilman are both very well known in the Adirondacks and beyond for their stunning panoramic landscapes, while Battaglia has assembled an extensive portfolio of Adirondack sports and action photos and Farb brings his journalistic senses to exploring this timeless landscape. All four voices sing together in beautifully harmony to convey the majestic vision of the Adirondacks as only artists living in these mountains can.

The show also debuts new talents, including Johnathan A. Esper, Lesley Dixion, and Clark Lubbs, and features a showing of the works of the instructors at View in a special exhibit called “Teachers Turn.”

The opening reception for all of this is Friday, December 2nd from 5-7pm. On Saturday, December 3rd, Mark Bowie will present his photos and discuss techniques in “Night at North Country,” at 11:00 am. Admission to the special presentation and the entire exhibit is $10 for nonmembers and $5 for members of the View. Children under 12 are free. The show continues through March 3, 2012 for the same admission.

For more information, visit the website or call 315-369-6411.

Photos courtesy of the View at Old Forge. Above by Mark Bowie; Below by Nancie Battaglia.

Linda J. Peckel explores the Adirondacks by following the arts wherever they take her. You can read more of her general art musings (including writing, photography, film, and painting) on her blog: Arts Enclave.


Thursday, October 27, 2011

DEC Announces Local Clean Air Grants

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced awards for “Clean Air Grants” to 13 New York communities, including three in the Adirondack region. The grants are hoped to assist counties, towns and villages in reducing open burning of leaves and other organic materials, educate residents about the dangers of open burning and assist with the purchasing of recycling and composting equipment.

“DEC is committed to reducing harmful air pollutants and the prevention of destructive wildfires,” DEC Commissioner Joe Martens said in a prepared statement. “In addition to releasing harmful pollutants such as benzene, formaldehyde and lead, the open burning of residential organic waste such as leaves and branches, is the largest single cause of wildfires in the state.”

A total of $60,000 was awarded for 13 projects statewide ranging from helping the Village of Windsor in Broome County better manage wood waste to partnering with the Dutchess County Town of Tivoli to conduct a home composting pilot project and help educate residents about safer alternatives to open burning. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provides DEC with the funding for these grants.

DEC recently extended restrictions on the open burning of residential organic waste in all communities statewide, regardless of the community’s size in population.

The Clean Air Grant Program was designed to help local communities better manage residential organic waste materials and also build better community understanding of the dangers associated with open burning. Grants of up to $5,000 were awarded to the following local communities:

Town of Pinckney, Lewis County, to assist in the purchase of a commercial wood chipper to give area residents a safer option for disposing branches and other tree waste. The Town will partner with the Tug Hill Commission and Development Authority of the North County to educate residents about the availability of the chipping service, the dangers of open burning and how they can get wood chips and mulch from the program.

Town of Webb, Herkimer County, to assist in the purchase of a municipal leaf vacuum to help the community safely and efficiently remove and compost organic materials. In addition to the health and safety benefits of reducing of open burning, the Town also identifies the economic benefits of maintaining clean air and a healthy eco-system within the Adirondack Park.

Town of Boonville, Oneida County, to repair and refurbish a municipal leaf collection vacuum to reduce the possible loss of life and property that can often result from open burning and the added burden it puts on local volunteer fire companies.


Wednesday, October 19, 2011

High Peaks Happy Hour: Glenmore Bar and Grill, Big Moose

As we traveled the six miles down Big Moose Road to the Glenmore Bar and Grill, we noticed it was populated with summer camps right down to Big Moose Lake. Perplexed by the distinct absence of people on this beautiful summer day in July, we pulled in to the mostly deserted parking lot. Given that it was early afternoon, possibly everyone was out pursuing summer pleasures on the lake or in town at Eagle Bay.

A two-story shingled structure flanked by ancient pines at the water’s edge, dormers peek out from above. With a spacious deck overlooking the lake, the Glenmore exudes history. We passed through the entrance doors to the main floor which houses the restaurant and bar, immediately encountering historic memorabilia and postings at the main entrance. Gleaming pine booths lined a sunny dining area, partially separated from the dining room and bar. Ivy wandered, taking over the room, repeated in stenciled embellishment over the windows. Sunlight streamed through picture windows, competing with rustic hues and textures for control of the lighting. At once dark and light, the hardwood floor, low pine plank ceiling, rough-sawn slab walls painted in tones of sage and brown, and simple pine booths were softly illuminated by daylight. A couple of well-worn plaid sofas faced the stone fireplace, the focal point of the center of the restaurant. A game room and pool table are available for use, but the Glenmore seems to be a venue for long stories and general banter.

The bar, with its panoramic view of the lake, seats 15 to 20 people. A handful of guests intently watched a soccer game as we introduced ourselves, and our purpose, to the bartender. Beer selection is primarily domestic, mostly from the Anheuser Busch and Matt’s brewing families. Canned beers (14 of them) include Utica Club and Genesee. Very retro. As Pam sat at the bar trying to decide what to order from the standard selection of liquors, she noticed that every one of the bar pours on the liquor bottles was not only the same color (green), but were all pointing in the same “wrong” direction. We have been to a lot of bars and have never seen either phenomenon. Not willing to let it go on observation, she mentioned to the bartender that he might have difficulties if he hired a left-handed bartender. Promising that would never happen, he smiled graciously and changed the subject, but seemed pleased that his efforts were noticed. We did take the time to inquire if the Glenmore had any specialty drinks unique to the establishment. Robert shared the ingredient list of the Flaming Glenmore, consisting of coffee, Yukon Jack, Amaretto and whipped cream.

It took some time for him to loosen up, but owner/bartender Robert Muller eventually warmed to our inquisition. He told us of a writers’ group that, for the past 36 years, meets at the Glenmore. Robert is of the opinion that some may no longer write, but continue to enjoy each other’s company, spending a weekend there every year under the auspices of the Tamarack Writers Group. (For the record, he did not use the word “auspices”.)

Kim inquired about hauntings, particularly in the death of Grace Brown in 1906. Grace and her companion, Chester Gillette, had checked in to the Glenmore the night before her demise, which she met at the hands of Gillette while rowing out on the lake. Several locations around Big Moose Lake claim to be haunted by her presence, and the television series Unsolved Mysteries aired an episode based on ghostly encounters in Big Moose in 1996. Robert also mentioned the apparition of a “creepy, tall, old dude” who occasionally makes his presence known.

The Glenmore Hotel Bar & Grill has been in business for 100 years and owned by the current owners, the Muller family, since the 1970s. When a fire of suspicious origin destroyed the original hotel in 1950, the Glenmore Hotel relocated across the street to its present location, originally home to the Big Moose Supply Company. A bar, restaurant and hotel located yards from Big Moose Lake, you can feel the history as you gaze upon the lake from the bar.

In summer months, the Glenmore is open Monday through Thursday from 4 p.m. to 1 a.m. and noon to 1 a.m. on weekends. Closed Monday through Thursday in the fall and spring, they are open Friday through Sunday. Surprisingly, to us at least, Robert, who likes winter best, claims that winter is the best season to visit. Winter hours at the Glenmore begin with opening for the Snodeo, occurring this year December 9-11, and end with St. Patrick’s Day. The no-nonsense menu includes pizzas, salads, burgers, sandwiches and bar munchies in the $7 to $10 range.

The hotel has 11 rooms accommodating up to 24 people. Rooms are simple, unique and comfortable with few amenities. Two full and one half bath are shared by all the guests. They have no WiFi, no cell service either, but a phone booth outside actually appeared to still be in service. History, a remote setting, simple charm, and circumspect hospitality await guests and visitors to the Glenmore Bar and Grill.

Kim and Pam Ladd’s book, Happy Hour in the High Peaks, is currently in the research stage. Together they visit pubs, bars and taverns with the goal of selecting the top 46 bars in the Adirondack Park. They regularly report their findings here at the Almanack and at their own blog, or follow them on Facebook, and ADK46barfly on Twitter.



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