Posts Tagged ‘Historic Preservation’

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

Nominations Sought for 2018 Preservation Awards

valcour brewing coAdirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH), the historic preservation organization for the region, has opened nominations for its 2018 Preservation Awards

These annual awards recognize sensitive restoration, rehabilitation, and adaptive reuse of historic structures throughout the region, as well as individuals who have promoted historic preservation and community revitalization consistent with AARCH’s mission.  » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Buildings on the Forest Preserve: The Historic Classification

The management of historic buildings on the Forest Preserve has been a vexing issue for decades. State management has evolved over the years from a position of building removal to now accommodating historic buildings on the Forest Preserve through the creation of a “Historic” area classification.

The state has since built a policy of retaining buildings for public educational and historic preservation purposes. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, April 8, 2018

Bauer: Buildings on the Forest Preserve

The pressure by local governments and historic preservation groups on the state to keep the inner Gooley Club buildings shows some of the challenges the state has had in organizing a coherent management program for buildings on the Forest Preserve. This is not a new issue.

It’s been a struggle for decades. Different administrations have dealt with the issue in different ways over the decades; some making ad hoc choices with long-term implications for Forest Preserve law and policy, and others trying to sort out durable long-term solutions. This is the first of three articles that look in depth at the issue of buildings on the Forest Preserve. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 5, 2018

Dave Gibson: More On Inner Gooley Club

As noted in stories in Adirondack Explorer and Almanack, the Inner Gooley Club buildings on the shores of Third Lake in the Essex Chain, were nominated for inclusion in the State and National Register of Historic Places.

The nomination is controversial because the lake and lands around it, including the Gooley Club footprint, is publicly-owned Adirondack Forest Preserve classified Primitive, and managed as closely as possible to Wilderness guidelines. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Peter Bauer: Sporting Clubs, Hinchey Law, And The Forest Preserve

The State of New York continues to face the challenge of managing buildings on the Forest Preserve in the Adirondack Park.

This has been an issue for decades and is now an even bigger issue at the inner Gooley Club, a complex of more than a dozen buildings, on Third Lake in the heart of the Essex Chain Lakes Primitive area. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 7, 2018

AARCH Adds Educational Programs Director

Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) has announced that Valerie Pawlewicz has joined the AARCH staff as their new Educational Programs Director. An announcement form the historic preservation organization said she plans to focus on continuing and expanding AARCH’s educational programming including the popular series of summer tours throughout the Adirondack region.

Valerie Pawlewicz comes to AARCH with a background in educational travel planning, event coordination, oral history, and garden design. Valerie has worked for the Smithsonian Institution, the Baltimore Museum of Art, St. John’s College and on contract for the Maryland Historic Trust. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, September 7, 2017

AARCH Preservation Award Winners Announced

Old Stone Barracks now the Valcour Brewing CompanyAdirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH), the region’s private nonprofit, historic preservation organization, will be presenting its annual Preservation Awards on Monday, September 18 to five projects “that exemplify the extraordinary preservation work being done in communities throughout the Adirondacks.”

Two awards will also be presented for individual achievement. “These awards honor the best examples of sensitive restoration, rehabilitation, and long-term stewardship by individuals, organizations, local governments, and businesses,” according to an announcement from AARCH.  » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Hotel Saranac Celebrates 90th Year

hotel saranac lobby postcardHotel Saranac was built in 1927, and opened its doors on July 1 of that year. Now celebrating its 90th year, it remains the last of the grand hotels that once populated Saranac Lake. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, May 17, 2017

100 Mile House: Local Economies and Sustainability

Left Mace Chasm Road farmhouse, Keeseville. Right WarrensburghIn many aspects of AARCH’s work — lectures, tours, workshops, advocacy, and other educational offerings — we make the case for the preservation of historic buildings.

• Historic buildings have aesthetic appeal.
• Buildings and places connect us to our history as well as shaping our individual and collective identity.
• Historic preservation is rich in new economic opportunities.
• The preservation of historic buildings can be transformational for communities.
• Using existing buildings and concentrating new growth in already settled areas is both good for the vitality of a community and helps to protect wild and open spaces.

And all of this helps to make our communities better places to live, work, and visit. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Wakely Mountain Firetower In Danger of Collapse, Trail Closed

Wakley Mountain Fire Tower - DEC PhotoThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has closed the Wakely Mountain Trail until further notice due to safety concerns with the Wakely Mountain Fire Tower.

“The fire tower was closed to public access in December 2016 due to structural deficiencies,” and announcement from the state agency said. “The condition of the tower has worsened and it is possible the tower may collapse in heavy winds.” » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Steven Engelhart: Every Community Needs a Beating Heart

Old Forge Hardware CompanyThere is overwhelming evidence that the most successful communities — with thriving economies, healthy schools and social and cultural institutions — are those that embrace their own history and preserve their historic buildings. Good jobs, protection of natural resources, and good leadership are perhaps even more important. Historic preservation is a critical element in the revitalization of struggling communities and it is a visible expression of a community investing in itself and improving its own quality of life.

Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) has always been a strong advocate for the connection between historic preservation and community vitality. We work to preserve individual buildings, yes, but we also advocate for preservation because historic places can become affordable housing, attractive spaces for businesses, innovative cultural centers, new farms, restaurants and other attractions. Preservation is about finding new uses for historic structures, not just saving buildings. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, April 23, 2017

Adirondack Historic Preservation Award Nominations Sought

Old Warren County Courthouse_ Lake GeorgeAdirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH), the historic preservation organization for the region, has opened nominations for its 2017 Preservation Awards. For over 20 years, these annual awards have recognized sensitive restoration, rehabilitation, and adaptive reuse of historic structures, as well as individuals who have promoted historic preservation and community revitalization consistent with AARCH’s mission.

Projects of all sizes and scopes are eligible for consideration. The deadline for nominations is July 1, 2017. A celebration of the 2017 award winners will be on September 18, 2017, at a farm-to-table luncheon at the Nettle Meadow Farm, a 2016 AARCH Presevation Award recipient in the town of Thurman near Warrensburg. » Continue Reading.


Monday, April 17, 2017

Steven Engelhart: What Makes Historic Preservation Irresistible

The Church of the Transfiguration Our Vermont friends behind “Preservation in Pink” define historic preservation as “an eternally optimistic, inspiring field intent on improving present and future quality of life through the appreciation of our built and cultural heritage.” Although we are still a long way from being a nation or a region of true historic preservationists, we are increasingly becoming more preservation-minded as the intersections between preservation and common sense, community health, good stewardship, and sustainability becomes better understood.

So what makes historic preservation so attractive, even irresistible? » Continue Reading.


Friday, March 17, 2017

Animal Tracking Event at Final Santanoni Ski Weekend

Tracking with SUNY ESFMarch 18th and 19th is the last Great Camp Santanoni Winter Weekend. Visitors can ski or snowshoe to Camp Santanoni, the restored 19th-century “Great Camp” in Newcomb and walk through the Main Lodge, boathouse and other buildings.

Volunteers from Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) will lead tours and talk about the history, design, and family life at this unique, state-owned historic site. Visitors may warm up by the wood stove in the Artist’s Studio on the shores of Newcomb Lake, and enjoy complimentary hot beverages (bring your own cup). » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 14, 2017

State Considers Buying Adirondack Rail-Trail Parcels

The state is considering buying the only two parcels it doesn’t own in the 34-mile rail corridor between Lake Placid and Tupper Lake, which would remove a legal impediment to replacing the train tracks with a recreational trail. Another option is to obtain an easement that would allow the public to use the parcels.

Evidently, though, some kind of agreement with the landowners needs to be reached for the state to go ahead with its controversial plan to remove the tracks.

The Adirondack Railway Preservation Society, which for years has operated a seasonal tourist train out of Lake Placid, has gone to court to block the removal of the rails.

After a hearing in late January, acting State Supreme Court Justice Robert G. Main Jr. asked the state to provide more information on the ownership of the corridor. Assistant Attorneys General Marie Chery-Sekhobo and Nicholas Buttino complied with the request in a memorandum of law sent to the judge last week. » Continue Reading.


Page 1 of 3123