Posts Tagged ‘Horseshoe Lake Wild Forest’

Friday, November 15, 2019

Featured Hike: Mount Arab, Tupper Lake

Mount Arab TrailLocated in the 17,123-acre Horseshoe Lake Wild Forest is the popular Mount Arab Fire Tower. The Wild Forest also provides easy access to Tupper Lake and Horseshoe Lake for fishing and boating.

The Mount Arab Trail ascends 700 feet to the Mount Arab fire tower and observer’s cabin on the summit of Mount Arab and is 1 mile long, with the first 0.7 miles located on the Conifer Emporium Conservation Easement and the rest on the Wild Forest. » Continue Reading.


Friday, November 8, 2019

Featured Hike: Coney Mountain, Tupper Lake

Coney Mountain Trail courtesy adirondack atlasLocated in the 17,123-acre Horseshoe Lake Wild Forest is the 2,280-foot Coney Mountain. The forest also provides easy access to Tupper Lake and Horseshoe Lake for fishing and boating. Camping in this area provides an excellent base camp opportunity for wilderness canoe trips into surrounding Wilderness Areas. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, December 31, 2015

3 Adirondack Snowshoe Trips

Santoni_range-1Snowshoeing in the Adirondacks has a long history. Originally a means of travel, it is now a popular recreational pastime. The French called snowshoes raquettes because the paddle-shaped contraptions of earlier times resembled rackets. They were used by hunters and trappers.

Today’s snowshoes are more rugged and lightweight than the wooden raquettes of yore. They’re usually made of aluminum, plastic, and nylon and come equipped with crampons that allow us to climb over ice, bare rock, and deep snow — that is, almost anywhere except up a tree. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, June 19, 2014

Trail To Honor Civil Rights Worker Andrew Goodman

Goodman Mountain TrailThe Adirondack Park Agency has approved the adoption and rerouting of a trail up Goodman Mountain (2,176 feet) in the Horseshoe Lake Wild Forest (part of the Bog River Complex) in honor of Andrew Goodman, a civil rights worker murdered on June 21, 1964.

Local historian William Frenette of Tupper Lake led a successful effort to have the peak named Goodman Mountain in 2002. The Goodman family built and lived in a stone house near the outlet of the Bog River at the south end of Tupper Lake that still stands today.

Goodman was helping register African Americans to vote near Philadelphia, Mississippi, as part of the Freedom Summer project of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) when he was abducted by members of the Ku Klux Klan along with Mickey Schwerner and James Chaney. » Continue Reading.



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