Posts Tagged ‘Invasive Species’

Saturday, June 8, 2024

Conservation District tree sales help to clean climate

LAKE PLEASANT – Planting trees could very well be our planet’s quintessential conservation practice.  After all, trees produce oxygen, absorb pollution, prevent soil erosion, provide homes for wildlife, and help people find calm among the chaos of everyday life.  All across New York, county Soil and Water Conservation Districts (SWCD) held tree sales that clean the climate, green local neighborhoods, and spruce up communities.

The Dacre family on their way home with their seedling packs to plant.

Conservation Districts are the go-to organizations to help achieve New York State’s Climate Act goals, including planting 25 million trees by 2033.  In 2023 alone, their tree sales resulted in planting 489,488 seedlings statewide.  Plantings will leaf out and protect the environment.

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Saturday, June 1, 2024

Over 60 events set for Invasive Species Awareness Week, June 3 – 9

Participants at a previous New York Invasive Species Awareness Week event.

Monday, June 3, marks the beginning of the 11th annual New York Invasive Species Awareness Week (NYISAW)! NYISAW is a week celebrated annually throughout the state to highlight the impacts of invasive species in New York and what folks can do to help.

Organizations across all of New York State are offering a variety of engaging events, such as interpretive hikes, volunteer days, webinars, movie screenings, and fun family activities. By participating in NYISAW, people can help protect their community’s natural spaces, learn about the emerging invasive species, meet neighbors, get outdoors, and even win prizes.

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Monday, September 18, 2023

APIPP to host Invasive Species in a Changing Climate webinar, Sept. 20

APIPP invasive species webinar graphic.

Keene Valley, NY- The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is hosting a free webinar on how climate change could make the Adirondacks more hospitable to invasive species. “Invasive Species in a Changing Climate” is scheduled for 10-11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 20. The webinar will begin with an overview of what makes a species invasive before diving into how longer summers and shorter, milder winters in the Adirondacks are likely to make the region more favorable to invasive species. The impact of climate change on managing invasive species and an overview of which invasive species tend to benefit the most from climate change will also be discussed.

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Saturday, July 22, 2023

Volunteers welcome to join the 8th Annual Invasive Species Mapping Challenge

8th Annual Invasive Species Mapping Challenge

Through the month of July, the NY Natural Heritage Program is hosting the 8th Annual Invasive Species Mapping Challenge. Volunteers and professionals are joining forces to gather data on invasive species, providing conservation managers with the information they need to protect our natural resources. This year, the target species are Beech Leaf Disease, tree-of-heaven, jumping worm, and three aquatic invasive plants – water chestnut, European frogbit, and watercress.

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Sunday, June 4, 2023

New York’s 10th annual Invasive Species Awareness Week begins June 5

Close-up of Hydrilla. Photo: Chris Evans, River to River CWMA, Bugwood.org. Courtesy of the New York Invasive Species Information Clearinghouse

On June 2, the New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture and Markets (AGM) announced the State’s 10th annual Invasive Species Awareness Week (ISAW) begins Monday, June 5. Free events and invasive species challenges are offered from June 5 through 11 across the state and online, including daily webinars at 1 p.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday.

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Saturday, May 27, 2023

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program announces free summer education series

Photography for Nature Lovers APIPP graphic

Keene Valley – The Nature Conservancy’s Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is gearing up for a summer of diverse educational programs on the importance of reporting, managing and preventing the spread of invasive species by offering a free summer education series. On June 9, APIPP will celebrate New York’s Invasive Species Awareness Week with two programs, one field trip and one webinar.

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Wednesday, February 22, 2023

Field Training for Invasive Hemlock Woolly Adelgid set for March 11

closeup of hemlock woolly adelgid

Bolton Landing, NY – The public is invited to attend a hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) field survey training on Saturday, March 11, from 10 am to noon, at Hearthstone Point Campground in Lake George.

Program leaders will give an overview of winter outing safety skills, while teaching how to identify hemlock trees, survey for hemlock woolly adelgid, and report findings using iMapInvasives.

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Saturday, January 21, 2023

APIPP: Forest Pest Hunters training webinar set for Jan. 24

Lake George

ADIRONDACKS – Forest Pest Hunter volunteer Bill Widrig has reported more than 300 forest pest survey observations, and he isn’t done yet. Widrig was among the first to join the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program’s Forest Pest Hunters effort when it began in 2021.

 

“Our property on the lake has old growth hemlock, some over 200 years old, that are very special to us,” Widrig said. “As hemlock woolly adelgid is a threat to these trees and all other hemlocks in the Northeast, I felt that I could not in good conscience just stand by and do nothing to help stop the spread of this pest.”

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Saturday, October 1, 2022

DEC Finds New Exotic Pest Affecting Elm Trees in St. Lawrence County

On September 26, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced that the elm zigzag sawfly (Aproceros leucopoda) was detected for the first time in New York State at three locations in St. Lawrence County, including Wilson Hill Wildlife Management Area, Brasher State Forest, and Lost Nation State Forest. This exotic pest feeds exclusively on elm trees and can cause severe defoliation, branch dieback, and crown thinning. Although the sawfly has not yet been shown to cause tree mortality, repeated defoliation by established sawfly populations would put added stress on native elm trees already heavily impacted by Dutch elm disease.

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Sunday, August 14, 2022

Remember to Use Local Firewood When Camping

Firewood

Many people like to take firewood from their homes before traveling to a campsite. Invasive pests like the emerald ash borer or Asian long-horned beetle often hitch a ride to new areas in untreated wood. As a result, transport of untreated wood across the state has caused outbreaks of these damaging pests.

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Wednesday, July 20, 2022

Controlling an Invasive Plant Without Herbicides

Invasive species are plants, animals, fungi, or microorganisms that spread rapidly and cause harm to other species. They are introduced species that can thrive in areas beyond their natural range of dispersal.

     Characteristically, invasive plant species are adaptable, aggressive, and usually lacking natural enemies that can limit their growth and populations. They have a high reproductive capability; growing rapidly in short life cycles and producing abundant amounts of seed. They aggressively compete with native plants and plant communities and often displace them, thereby disrupting the normal functioning of ecosystems and threatening biodiversity and already endangered native plant species.
     Purple loosestrife is a perfect example of an introduced plant species that has become a serious and widespread threat to native species, natural communities, and ecosystem processes. It was brought to North America by the European colonists as an herbal remedy for dysentery, diarrhea, and other digestive ailments and introduced in the 1800s as an ornamental. It was well-established in New England by the 1830s, and spread along canals and other waterways. Supposedly sterile species were offered for sale for many years, but researchers later found that those cultivars were fully capable of cross-pollinating with plants growing in the wild.

Monday, June 6, 2022

New York Invasive Species Awareness Week is June 6 -12


The mission of the New York Invasive Species Awareness Week (NYISAW) is to promote knowledge and understanding of invasive species and the harm they can cause. We want to empower YOU to stop the spread of invasive species!

Organizations across all of New York State are offering a variety of engaging events, such as interpretive hikes, volunteer days, webinars, movie screenings, and fun family activities!

By participating in NYISAW, you can help protect your community’s natural spaces, learn about new invasive species, meet your neighbors, get outdoors, and even win prizes!

Find events near you!

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Saturday, May 21, 2022

Lake George groups at odds over milfoil plan

lake george

The Lake George Association last week made good on its promise to explore all options for blocking the planned use of an aquatic herbicide on Lake George.

The nation’s oldest lake association – along with Lake George Waterkeeper Chris Navitsky, the Town of Hague and a shoreline resident – sued Thursday to stop the herbicide plan. In its petition, the association took aim at the process that led to permit approvals by the Department of Environmental Conservation and Adirondack Park Agency, arguing the agencies failed to consider important concerns raised by the public. The suit accuses the state agencies of “behind the scenes decision-making” to rush the plan to approval.

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Monday, April 18, 2022

Town of Hague opposes use of milfoil herbicide in Lake George

Blair's Bay on Lake George is site of proposed herbicide treatmentThe Lake George Park Commission (LGPC) applied for and was granted on April 14 a permit from the Adirondack Park Agency (APA) to put the herbicide ProcellaCOR into Lake George at two pilot sites: Blair’s Bay in Glen Burnie and Sheep Meadow Bay in Hulett’s Landing. Although both sites are located on the east side of the lake, they are part of the Town of Hague, whose boundaries extend to the eastern shoreline.  

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Thursday, April 7, 2022

How to Scrape Spongy Moth Eggs

spongy mass eggsHave you noticed spongy moth egg masses in your neighborhood? Last year was a boom year for spongy moth (formerly known as gypsy moth) caterpillar populations, especially in Central and Western NY. Egg masses contain 600-700 eggs each and will hatch around May. If you find them now, you can scrape them off trees or buildings and drop them into a container of detergent to prevent the eggs from hatching.

Spongy moths are non-native, but are naturalized, meaning they will always be around in our forests. They tend to spike in numbers roughly every 10-15 years but outbreaks are usually ended by natural causes such as predators and disease. Removing their egg masses is not a cure for spongy moth infestations, but it is a small step you can take to help protect trees in your neighborhood. To learn more about this species and management efforts throughout the year, visit our website.

Pictured: spongy moth egg masses on a tree



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