Posts Tagged ‘Invasive Species’

Thursday, October 26, 2017

Emerald Ash Borer Class for Woodland Owners Planned

emerald ash borer photo courtesy DECThis August, the emerald ash borer (EAB) was confirmed in both St. Lawrence and Franklin counties. The Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), and NYS Agriculture and Markets will hold a class on EAB on November 1, 2017 from 5:45 to 8 pm at the Cornell Cooperative Extension Learning Farm, 2043 State Route 68, Canton. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, October 22, 2017

Paul Hetzler: If An Ash Tree Falls

Call it an infection or an epidemic, but even the most docile and pleasant woods will soon be transformed into Fangorn Forest. As far as anyone knows, local trees will probably not become animate like the ones in the fictional woodland of J.R.R. Tolkein’s trilogy. However, they may be just as dangerous, only for a different reason.

In The Lord of the Rings, trees were inherently good, and if provoked sufficiently could take up arms and kill lots of bad guys. Presumably our trees are also of good will, or at least do not have anything against humans in particular. But changes are coming within the next decade that will render them dangerous through no fault or intent of their own. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, October 21, 2017

Major Grant Funds Watershed Institute’s Invasives Work

Adirondack Watershed Institute stewardThe Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute has received a $594,276 grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for its ongoing work in controlling and preventing the spread of aquatic invasive species.

The funds will go toward work carried out by AWI stewards at approximately 10 different locations, including Upper St. Regis Lake, the St. Lawrence River and the lower Raquette River Reservoirs. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Adirondack Aquatic Invasives Science, Logistics Webinars Planned

boat inspectionInvasive species are increasingly challenging New York water resource managers. New research making it possible to identify waters at risk for future invasion is on the agenda during a new Watercraft Inspection Program Webinar Series developed by New York Sea Grant Extension of Cornell University and set to begin October 19th.

Richard R. Shaker of Ryerson University, co-author of Predicting aquatic invasion in Adirondack lakes will present one of the four sessions in the free webinar series.

Watercraft Inspection Data Collection App Pilot Program survey results, noting recent aquatic invasive detections aboard boats launching or leaving NY waters, as collected by six of the more than 20 watercraft inspection programs in New York State will be highlighted in another session. » Continue Reading.


Friday, September 15, 2017

Emerald Ash Borer Confirmed in Northern New York

emerald ash borer photo courtesy DECThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that invasive pest emerald ash borer (EAB) has been found and confirmed for the first time in Franklin and St. Lawrence counties. DEC captured the insects in monitoring traps at the two locations.

DEC confirmed the specimens as adult EABs on August 25. The invasive pest was found within a few miles of the Canadian border and may represent an expansion of Canadian infestations into New York. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 27, 2017

First Adirondack Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Infestation Confirmed

On the lookout for hungry bugsThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that “a minor infestation” of the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Adelges tsugae) was confirmed on Forest Preserve lands in the town of Lake George in Warren County on July 1. This is the first known infestation of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) in the Adirondacks.

A small cluster of early stage HWA was detected on one branch of an old-growth Eastern hemlock tree on Prospect Mountain during a field trip by a Senior Ecologist from the Harvard Research Forest. » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 7, 2017

A Call For Citizen Scientists To Remove Asian Clams In Sandy Bay

Citizen Scientists participating in the Lake George Association's first Asian Clam Citizen Science Day.Last year, 475 Asian clams — a small clam, less than 1.5 inches in size, that can spread rapidly — were removed from Lake George, thanks to a half day of work from about 20 volunteers as part of the Lake George Association’s Asian Clam Citizen Science Day in Sandy Bay.

The association hopes for a similar result this year from 10 am to 1 pm Monday July 10 when it holds its second Asian Clam Citizen Science Day as part of New York’s Invasive Species Awareness Week July 9 through 15. » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 7, 2017

Invasive Species Awareness Week July 9-15

So far this summer has been rain with just enough sun to grow everything I’ve planted and sprout other seeds I never knew existed. Since I like the weeds and wildflowers (Joe-pye weed, milkweed, bunchberry, and wild wintergreen), I just leave the unidentified plants alone.  I save wildflowers from the center of our yard by transplanting them into flowerbeds or alongside our house, fences, and roadside.

Since not all non-native plants are invasive, it’s important to find out what plants are causing harm to the environment and make sure I’m not contributing to the problem. I don’t want to bring anything into the yard that is considered an Adirondack invasive, I’ve always taken advantage of the Cornell University Cooperative Extension team of master gardeners to answer questions, look at samples, and provide a bevy of useful information. I want my garden to be a safe haven for any pollinators. » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 7, 2017

Common Ground Alliance Meeting Planned In Old Forge

Adirondack Common Ground Alliance Forum group photo 2016The annual Common Ground Alliance Forum will be held on Tuesday, July 11, from 8:30 am to 3:30 pm, at View in Old Forge. Topics for this year’s event range from attracting young people to the region to combating invasive species, and were selected based on survey responses from nearly 300 community leaders, business owners, government officials and Adirondack residents.

Community stakeholders from all over the Adirondacks are expected to come together to coordinate their efforts for collective action. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Invasive Species Awareness Week Events Announced for the Adirondacks

invasive species awareness weekNew York State’s fourth annual Invasive Species Awareness Week (ISAW) will take place July 9th-15th. The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is collaborating with various partner organizations to offer more than 15 invasive species related events, including  Backcountry Water Monitors Training, Terrestrial Invasive Plant ID & Survey Training, Lake Champlain Water Chestnut Paddle & Pull, and Adirondack Invaders Day at The Wild Center. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, June 18, 2017

Non-Native Jellyfish Found In Newcomb ‘Heritage Lake’

View of Wolf Lake during summer 2016A SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry undergraduate received the Hudson River Foundation’s Polgar Fellowship this summer to conduct water sampling in Wolf Lake on SUNY-ESF’s Huntington Wildlife Forest (HWF) under my guidance.

Sampling will be conducted to determine if water quality changes observed over the past few summers in Wolf Lake might be due to a relatively unknown but widespread organism, the freshwater jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbii. » Continue Reading.


Friday, June 9, 2017

Invasive Species Trainings in the Adirondacks

AIS-training: Volunteers are shown how to complete survey data sheets to contribute to a region-wide lake monitoring program led by APIPP's Aquatic Invasive Species Program Coordinator Erin Vennie-VollrathThe Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is offering a series of free training sessions to help protect Adirondack woods and waters from the harmful impacts of invasive species this summer. These workshops are open to the public.

Participants can learn to identify, survey for and manage invasive species currently threatening the Adirondack region, such as Japanese knotweed and Eurasian watermilfoil, as well as those that pose significant risk to the region, but have not yet arrived, such as hydrilla and mile-a-minute weed. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, May 20, 2017

NY State Expands Emerald Ash Borer Quarantine

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Department of Agriculture and Markets (DAM) have announced that eight existing Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Restricted Zones have been expanded and merged into a single Restricted Zone in order to strengthen the State’s efforts to slow the spread of this invasive pest.

The new EAB Restricted Zone includes part or all of Albany, Allegany, Broome, Cattaraugus, Cayuga, Chautauqua, Chenango, Chemung, Columbia, Cortland, Delaware, Dutchess, Erie, Genesee, Greene, Livingston, Madison, Monroe, Niagara, Oneida, Onondaga, Ontario, Orange, Orleans, Oswego, Otsego, Putnam, Rensselaer, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Schuyler, Seneca, Steuben, Sullivan, Tioga, Tompkins, Ulster, Wayne, Westchester, Wyoming, and Yates counties. The EAB Restricted Zone prohibits the movement of EAB and potentially infested ash wood. The map is available on DEC’s website. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Invasive Garlic Mustard Pull and Pesto Workshop Saturday

Past Garlic Mustard Pull and Pesto Workshop TAUNY (Traditional Arts in Upstate New York) and Nature Up North have invited the community to the third Garlic Mustard Pull and Pesto Workshop on Saturday, May 20th from 12:30 to 2:30 pm.

Garlic Mustard is an invasive herb that threatens native tree and wildflower species in our local forests. Fortunately, we can help control its spread by eating it. Interested participants are invited to join TAUNY and Nature Up North to help pull garlic mustard from where it is growing in Canton and take part in the North Country tradition of cooking with the bounty of the land – whether farmed or foraged. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 20, 2017

Emerging Concerns Over Banded Mystery Snails

Banded Mystery SnailThe warming temperatures and receding ice are giving way to open water and increased recreational activities. It is time once again to think about aquatic invasive species. An emerging threat to our fish populations and bird populations is the Banded Mystery Snail.

The Banded Mystery Snail (Viviparus georgianus) a non-native species to the Adirondacks was introduced in 1867 into the Hudson River. It is historically native to Florida and Georgia among other southeastern states. It has been found in many bodies of water located within New York, including Lake Champlain and Lake George. The public, officials and scientists have not taken much note of this non-native species believing that any environmental impacts would be negligible. Current data is showcasing a different picture and further research is needed. » Continue Reading.


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