Posts Tagged ‘July 4th’

Monday, July 4, 2022

The Rebranding of American Wilderness, as seen through historic postcards

historic postcard

By Margie Amodeo

In his “Essay on American Scenery,” Thomas Cole wrote that whether an American “beholds the Hudson mingling water with the Atlantic – explores the central wilds of this vast continent, or stands on the margins of distant Oregon, he is still in the midst of American scenery – it is his own land; its beauty, its magnificence, its sublimity – all are his; and how undeserving of such a birthright, if he can turn towards it an undeserving eye, an unaffected heart!”

Those who read the Adirondack Almanack regularly know it is not revolutionary to write that tourism in the Adirondacks became a model for tourism in the American consciousness. What has made such an impression on me, scanning over 1,200 postcards as a part of a digitization project in the Adirondack Research Library at the Kelly Adirondack Center of Union College, is how inextricably linked Adirondack tourists’ experiences are with American identity. 

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Sunday, July 3, 2022

Fireworks, live music set for July 4 in Inlet and Old Forge

The Inlet/Old Forge area will be a hub of activity this Independence Day weekend, with a wide array of activities planned ranging from engaging childrens’ activities, an informative presentation by Inlet’s American Legion Post #1402, fireworks displays, and live music on Adirondack lakefronts.

The festivities kick off on the evening of Sunday, July 3, with a free Summer Concert Series performance featuring local musicians, Alisha Kay Cartsens, and Joe Bolton at 7 p.m. on the Old Forge Lakefront. The summer concert series is sponsored by the Town of Webb. The fun continues in Old Forge on July 4 with live music by Floyd Community Instrumental Ensemble at the Old Forge Lakefront beginning at 7:30 p.m. A brilliant fireworks display over the Old Forge Pond will follow at dusk. For more information, please call (315) 369-6983.

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Wednesday, July 1, 2020

DEC issues fire danger warning for July 4th weekend


New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos today urged New Yorkers to practice the utmost safety during the upcoming holiday weekend. Dry weather throughout the month of June has increased the risk of fires.

There are currently three active wildfires in the state: one in St. Lawrence County; one in Herkimer County; and one in Tompkins County. Collectively, these fires are burning nearly 11 acres of land, and in some cases are 18 inches deep, requiring a pump operation with large volumes of water. Two other fires in St. Lawrence County over the weekend burned another 11 acres of land.

The majority of the state remains at a moderate risk for fires, meaning that any outdoor fire can spread quickly, especially if the wind picks up. Campfires are among the top five causes of wildfires. Fireworks are in the top 12. According to the National Safety Council, each year in the U.S. fireworks are responsible for more than 18,000 fires.

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Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Why We Celebrate the Fourth the Way We Do

1876 ODJ4thJulyFRFourth of July celebrations across the Adirondacks and foothills are rooted in regional and national traditions. The principal components — parades, social gatherings, feasts, and fireworks — have endured since the early 1800s. They’re actually based on suggestions by one of our Founding Fathers.

During the first century of the nation’s existence, memories of the revolution remained strong, spawning several customs that have since disappeared. Besides parades, food, and fireworks, it was common during that time to skewer King George in a variety of ways. Some towns presented plays with characters from the revolution, generating boos and hisses when the king’s character appeared on stage. All events of those days featured speeches that were widely anticipated, including at least one mocking King George for his treatment of the colonies. Another highlight in every city, town, and village celebration was a reading of the Declaration of Independence.

Each July, newspapers recounted the festivities held in communities large and small, from Albany and Troy to Plattsburgh, Ogdensburg, Watertown, and scores of small villages. Reading of the Declaration of Independence at each location was a revered tradition and truly the heart of every celebration. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Adirondack Independence Day Celebrations

IMG_7687An Adirondack Independence Day celebration is really no different than other parts of the country. There are parades, live music, carnival rides and fireworks. The one unique twist is we can choose to view fireworks from the shoreline of a favorite lake or the top of a mountain overlooking the village.  » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 3, 2014

Adirondack Independence Day Fireworks

fireworks_newThere is certainly a lot to do in the Adirondacks around Independence Day and a lot of choices to make on how you will spend your time. One activity that is a constant when celebrating July 4th is the evening fireworks display.

My family likes to keep things simple. We browse Farmers’ Markets and enjoy the fireworks from the lake.  Many towns around the Adirondacks have full day celebrations with face painting, live music and even barbeques. Some towns have live music preceding the firework display while others have parades to celebrate our heroes of war. » Continue Reading.



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