Posts Tagged ‘jumping worm’

Monday, October 11, 2021

Report Invasive Jumping Worms

wormsAttention, fall gardeners! While earthworms are usually a welcome sight in your garden, not all earthworms are alike. Jumping worms, sometimes known as “crazy worms,” are an invasive species native to Asia that are being found increasingly in many parts of New York State.

Jumping worms primarily stay in the top layer of soil, leaching nutrients and turning topsoil into a texture similar to coffee grounds. This makes it difficult for many plants to grow, including garden plants, trees, and lawns. You can tell the difference between a jumping worm and a less destructive European earthworm by examining the worm’s collar (clitellum). Jumping worms have a collar that is milky-white, relatively close to the head and flush with their bodies.

Here’s how you can help prevent the spread of jumping worms:

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Sunday, August 23, 2020

Lions, Tigers… and Jumping Worms?!

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program’s (APIPP) final Summer Learning Event is right around the corner, and this topic may be of interest to a wide array of anglers, gardeners, hikers, and foresters alike. Invasive jumping worms are a creepy crawly creature coming our way from other parts of the state with destructive consequences for forest habitats among other environments.

Spread by human activities from being used as live bait during fishing trips, to being carried on shoes and pets within dried mud, or brought into gardens in potted plants and compost – these voracious decomposers damage soil structure, root systems, and negatively impact forest habitats. They are present in many other parts of New York State, but limited in the Adirondack Region, and our hope is to keep it that way by growing awareness!

Title: Emerging Species – Watch Out for Jumping Worms

Date: Tuesday, August 25th, 10-11:30 a.m.

RSVP Link: Register online via APIPP’s website. Secure Zoom portal sent to your email upon registration.