Posts Tagged ‘Lake Placid Land Conservancy’

Tuesday, July 9, 2019

Conservationist, Native Plant Author Speaking in Placid

Doug TallamyDoug Tallamy, noted conservationist and author of Bringing Nature Home is set to present a lecture and slide show on Monday, July 22nd from 6 to 8 pm at Lake Placid Center for the Arts, 17 Algonquin Drive in Lake Placid.

Tallamy’s talk “Restoring Nature’s Relationships” focuses on how growing native plants in our yards, gardens, and local green spaces provides an opportunity — and a responsibility — to play a role in sustaining biodiversity. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, June 16, 2019

Conservation Minute: Conservation in a Changing Climate

lplc conservation minuteConservation efforts at the national and global scale are increasingly considering climate change, and with good reason. Extreme weather events – increased incidence or prolonged periods of drought, cold, heat, or heavy rainfall – are impacting traditional ways of life around the world with greater regularity.

While we often think of the Adirondacks as being a protected haven in the Northeast, those who’ve lived here or visited for years know that we are not immune to a changing climate. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, April 2, 2019

Conservation Minute: The Backyard Conservationist

lplc conservation minuteWhether you own acres of land or have a small flower garden, you have an important role to play in creating spaces that support wildlife. As our forests become more fragmented, its critical to start looking toward our front and back yards, and even our patios, to consider managing these spaces for biodiversity. » Continue Reading.


Monday, February 18, 2019

Conservation Minute: Microplastics

lplc conservation minuteAs their name suggests, microplastics are small – very small. They can measure up to 1/5 of an inch, but most are microscopic. These plastic fragments, beads, and fibers originate from the breakdown of every-day products we use and wear, such as water bottles, plastic bags, sponges, and clothing.

Some make their way into our environment as trash that has degraded over time due to wind or wave action – others enter directly via our drains. Wastewater treatment plants do trap some microplastics, but many are too small to be filtered so they are discharged back into our lakes and streams. » Continue Reading.


Monday, October 15, 2018

New Director For Lake Placid Land Conservancy

The Lake Placid Land Conservancy (LPLC) has announced the promotion of Kerry Crowningshield to Executive Director. Crowningshield joined LPLC in 2016 as the Outreach Coordinator.

In a statement to the press, Ms. Crowningshield said: “Growing up in the area gives me a unique understanding of the communities LPLC serves and their relationship to the Adirondacks. I choose to live and work here because I developed a connection to the lakes, rivers, and forests as a child, and want to ensure future generations and visitors have this same opportunity.” » Continue Reading.


Thursday, June 14, 2018

Public Access Planned For Three Sisters Preserve

Three Sisters Preserve The Lake Placid Land Conservancy (LPLC) has received a $26,000 grant to complete a management plan and develop public access improvements at their recently acquired Three Sisters Preserve in the Town of Wilmington.

After closing, the Barkeater Trails Alliance (BETA) constructed a 1.5-mile trail on the Preserve to connect the hamlet area of Wilmington to Hardy Road. This trail provides an off-road connection between the Flume Trails, the hamlet and the popular mountain bike trails in the DEC Wilmington Wild Forest Beaver Brook Tract along Hardy Road.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 27, 2017

Open Space Institute Grant Awarded For LPLC Acquisition

Members of the Board of Trustees of the Lake Placid Land Conservancy (LPLC), the Barkeater Trails Alliance, and LPLC staffThe Open Space Institute (OSI) recently awarded Lake Placid Land Conservancy (LPLC) a capital grant in the amount of $50,000 to support LPLC’s acquisition of a community forest preserve in Wilmington. LPLC acquired approximately 100 acres in Wilmington between Hardy Road and Quaker Mountain Lane on April 19, 2017, and plans to create a community forest preserve that will include approximately two miles of scenic, recreational trails. The new trails are expected to create a connection between the Hamlet of Wilmington and existing public lands and trails on the Beaver Brook tract of the Wilmington Wild Forest located on Hardy Road. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Conservancy Acquires 135 Acres At Otis Brook In Jay

otis brookLake Placid Land Conservancy recently acquired a 135-acre habitat and open space conservation easement in the Town of Jay, that was donated by local resident Gregory Claude Fetters. The property includes approximately 44 acres of northern Appalachian-Acadian, conifer- hardwood, acidic wetlands and over 90 acres of Laurentian-Acadian pine forest.

Conservation of the property permanently protects a variety of terrestrial and aquatic habitats, and allows the property to remain available for sustainable timber harvesting and eligible for enrollment in New York’s 480-A forest tax law. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, December 6, 2016

New Preserve, Wilmington-Hardy Road Bike Corridor Planned

LPLC Wilmington preserve photo Josh Wilson credit 11.28.2016The Lake Placid Land Conservancy (LPLC) plans to create a community preserve in the Town of Wilmington that will include two miles of recreational trails open to the public.

The project will create a connector trail between the hamlet of Wilmington and the existing public land and trails on the Beaver Brook Tract of the Wilmington Wild Forest located on Hardy Road.

LPLC anticipates closing on the properties to create the preserve by the end of March, 2017. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, September 4, 2016

Upper Saranac River Conservation Workshop Wednesday

working landscapes mapLake Placid Land Conservancy (LPLC) will be hosting a Community Conservation Workshop at the Saranac Lake Free Library on Wednesday, September 7, 2016, from 5:30 to 7 pm.

The workshop is intended for landowners and community members who are interested in discussing conservation and stewardship of private lands in the Saranac Lake region.

Through a recent mapping initiative, LPLC identified important land use characteristics and attributes (including important ecological, political and economic characteristics) on almost 100,000 acres of private lands in the region. LPLC staff will provide an overview of its mapping initiative and conduct interactive mapping exercises for its Saranac Lake focus area. » Continue Reading.


Monday, July 25, 2016

Adirondack Private Lands Symposium Wednesday

lake placidLake Placid Land Conservancy (LPLC) is hosting a panel discussion about conservation and stewardship opportunities on private lands in the Lake Placid region on Wednesday, July 27th at 6:30 pm at Heaven Hill Farm, located at 302 Bear Cub Lane in Lake Placid.

Through a recent mapping initiative, LPLC identified important land use characteristics and attributes (including important ecological and economic characteristics) on almost 100,000 acres of private lands in the region. LPLC staff will provide an overview of its mapping initiative and experts from the Adirondack Chapter of the Nature Conservancy (TNC), Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and Adirondack Council will serve as panelists and discuss wildlife habitat, approaches to conservation and stewardship, and biological monitoring on private lands within the Adirondack Park. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 26, 2016

Lake Placid Land Conservancy Wins DEC Outreach Grant

A144-acre property in Jay with a view of the Sentinel Range being conserved with a conservation easement by the Lake Placid land Conservancy.The Lake Placid Land Conservancy (LPLC) has been awarded a $25,000 New York State Conservation Partnership Program  grant to expand its outreach efforts across the Lake Placid region, including the towns of North Elba, Keene, Jay, Wilmington, Saranac Lake and St. Armand.

Once developed, the program is expected to offer interested, qualified landowners in the region the opportunity to develop conservation management plans for their properties and implement any one of a number of citizen science tools on their properties to monitor wildlife, invasive species, plant and animal phenology or climate change. » Continue Reading.