Posts Tagged ‘Local Farms’

Monday, March 25, 2019

Adirondack Buyer Days Features New Local Products

The Adirondack North Country Association (ANCA) will present its 33rd annual Adirondack Buyer Days on March 25 and 26 at the Saratoga Springs City Center.

The event is the only wholesale trade show in New York State devoted to handmade and locally sourced artisan products. This year’s show will feature products created by nearly 100 artisans from northern New York and New England. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 6, 2019

FarmShare Fund Grants Support Local Food

The Adirondack North Country Association (ANCA) has announced they are offering grant funding to support incorporating local food into existing hunger relief and food security efforts in the region. This is the second year the regional nonprofit has administered its FarmShare Fund mini grant program.

Organizers say that more than 200,000 households in the Adirondack North Country, or 41 percent of all households, do not have enough income or financial resources to cover basic household necessities. For these residents, local food options are often not affordable or accessible. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, February 17, 2019

Nominations Sought for Second Essex County ‘Farmacy’

food access project nominationAdkAction’s Farmacy project, a mixed-use healthy food retail storefront located in Keeseville Pharmacy, is seeking to replicate the model in the second location in Essex County.

Local businesses who are interested in a partnership with AdkAction to incorporate a small farm store into their existing storefront can be nominated between now and March 1st to be considered.


Sunday, February 10, 2019

Understanding This Winter’s Polar Vortex

A strong polar vortex configuration in November 2013I’d love to explain exactly what a polar vortex is, but I’ll spare you the details, mainly because I don’t know them.

Apparently, the definition of a polar vortex has been changed by the American Meteorological Society three times in the last 20 years — even the experts are still trying to nail down what it is. Besides freaking cold, I mean. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, February 7, 2019

Hemp: A Valuable Crop Returning to Production

Industrial Hemp Since the 1930s, hemp, once a widely grown and important crop in the United States has been considered a controlled substance due to its similarity with the cannabis plant grown for marijuana use. Although hemp used for industrial production, is in fact the cannabis plant, the same one that produces marijuana, there is an important difference – the THC produced in the plant.

THC is the main intoxicating ingredient in marijuana. Hemp cultivated for industrial purposes has much lower levels of THC than that grown for marijuana and cannot cause a drug induced high. It can however, be used to make over 25,000 different products ranging from textiles, to foods, to body care products, to building supplies. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, February 7, 2019

Adirondack Harvest Regional Meetings Planned

The Annual Regional Meetings of Adirondack Harvest is set to be held on Tuesday, February 12th and streamed live to local chapters.

Adirondack Harvest’s goal is to further sustainable agriculture in the Adirondack region and surrounding areas.  » Continue Reading.


Thursday, January 10, 2019

Geopolitics of Cheese

putting cheese into molds at the food science plant at Cornell's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) Stocking HallI enjoy a wide variety of dairy products. And I especially like cheese. All sorts of cheese. Hard, soft, sharp, mild, pungent, curds. Sliced, shredded, cubed, balled, spread, powdered, creamed, and whipped. A little tossed into my breakfast omelet; a slice, perhaps two, on my sandwich at lunch; a touch grated or sprinkled into my salad and/or over my pasta and/or drizzled on my veggies at supper. And then, of course, there’s pizza, cheesy burritos, mac and cheese, cheesecake, cheese Danish, wine and cheese. I can go on. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 6, 2019

Buying Local Food During An Adirondack Winter

As we head into the dead of winter the roads are icy, it’s cold outside, and farmers’ markets are becoming a distant memory of summer (although some can still be found here and there), it can be a challenge to remain dedicated to going the extra distance or to making the extra stop to buy local food. However, it is important to remember that an abundance of local food is still available that there are numerous benefits to buying locally grown food. » Continue Reading.


Friday, January 4, 2019

Farmacy Project Announces Expansion

Dan BoselyThe Farmacy, small farm store located inside the Keeseville Pharmacy, has received an Innovation Grant from Adirondack Health Institute.

The expansion is set to include the addition of a display freezer, gondola shelving, three glass-door merchandising coolers, and a bulk food unit. A full-time staff person has been hired to oversee and expand the model to an additional location in Essex County. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, December 27, 2018

Warren Co Extension Awarded Farm-to-School Grant

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Warren County has announced it has received a $93,582.00 grant from the Farm-to-School Program.

Cornell Cooperative Extension was one of eighteen projects chosen statewide. » Continue Reading.


Friday, December 7, 2018

Holiday Celebrations At The Grange

grange christmas carolThe Whallonsburg Grange Hall in Essex is set to hold its holiday celebration and performance of “A Christmas Carol” Radio Play on Sunday, December 9 at 3 pm, and their annual Holiday Market on Saturday, December 15 from 1 to 4 pm. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, November 10, 2018

Paul Hetzler Wants To Know – You Got Gas?

Dairy Cows in Collins Center New York 1999Even if its precise definition isn’t at the tip of your tongue, most everyone gets the general drift of what is meant by the term biogas — there’s biology involved, and the result is gas. One might guess it’s the funk in the air aboard the bus carrying the sauerkraut-eating team home after a weekend competition. Others would say biogas is cow belches, or the rotten-egg stink-bubbles that swarm to the surface when your foot sinks into swamp ooze.

Those are all examples of biogas, which is composed primarily of methane, CH4, at concentrations ranging from 50% to 60 %. Methane is highly combustible, and can be used in place of natural gas for heat or to run internal-combustion engines for the generation of electricity and other applications. Formed by microbes under anaerobic conditions, it is a greenhouse gas twenty-eight times more potent than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in Earth’s atmosphere. The fact that it can be useful if harnessed but dangerous if released is why we need to trap biogas given off by landfills, manure pits, and someday, maybe even cow burps. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Farmer-Producer Mini Grant Recipients Named

Kevin Richardson of Agbotic speaks with Starbuck Elementary School staff and studentsThe Adirondack North Country Association (ANCA) has announced the recipients of its 2018 Farmer/Producer Mini Grant program, which was designed to support the farm to school procurement process for local food producers and Jefferson and St Lawrence County schools.

The second round of grant recipients since the program’s inception in 2017 include two farms and one co-packer, whose proposed projects are expected to increase their capacity to supply schools with local food. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, November 4, 2018

Ag Business Conference Set For Lake Placid

Adirondack Farm Produce - Photo by Shannon HoulihanFarmers and agribusiness people in the region are invited to attend the Strategic Marketing Conference taking place in Lake Placid on November 7-8.

This conference will serve as an opportunity for those involved in producing and/or selling agricultural products to learn how to develop their brands and marketing strategies in order to increase sales. Speakers from around the state will share their knowledge and expertise in the areas of finding new markets, brand development for a competitive market, exporting, legal issues, and multi-channel selling strategies. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Jefferson County’s Charles Sherman: Huckleberry Charlie

The Altona Flat Rock is a rare and spectacular site I’ve referenced here in the past, and was the subject of my first book written long ago (it was updated in 2005 with new glaciology information). Besides details on the unusual topography, glacial remnants, an incredibly persistent fire, and one of the world’s largest dams when it was built in the early 1900s, there was also a human history to tell.

The forbidding landscape, similar to expanses in Maine, was conducive to the growth of blueberries, the harvest of which evolved into a phenomenon. Entire families established temporary villages of tents and shacks on the Flat Rock from July into September, picking thousands of quarts for sale to local customers and East Coast markets, including Boston and New York City.

A similar business was conducted at the same time on what today is known as Fort Drum in Jefferson County. It was originally known as Pine Camp, located on a several-thousand-acre area that historically bore the name of Pine Plains. While the Altona site in Clinton County was known locally as the Blueberry Rock, Pine Plains near Watertown was known for producing great quantities of huckleberries, a close “cousin” fruit that provided the nickname for our subject, Charles Sherman. » Continue Reading.