Posts Tagged ‘local food’

Saturday, June 23, 2018

Adirondack Farmers’ Markets Open for the Season

farmers market Farmers’ markets have existed as a part of American society, business, and trade since 1634, when the first farmers’ market in the new world opened for business in Boston, Massachusetts. And throughout much of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, outdoor market places were vital centers of commerce in both American cities and rural communities.

The Central Market, in Lancaster Pennsylvania, has been held in the same location since 1730. George Washington wrote about sending his kitchen staff to shop at Philadelphia’s outdoor market during the 1790s. And Thomas Jefferson wrote, in 1806, about buying beef, eggs and vegetables at an outdoor market in Georgetown. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, June 21, 2018

Babbie Rural and Farm Learning Museum’s Homestead Festival

Thankfully, there are a number of opportunities for all of us to learn about and have access to locally produced products. Farmers Markets are opening for the season. Farm tours are available and pollinator workshops continue to put the importance of locally grown food in the forefront.

I’ve always wanted my children to not only see the important role local food plays in our life and economy, but to see how other skills and crafts evolved in the Adirondacks and beyond. Since I don’t want everything to always be a lesson, one fun way to learn about the past and see craftsmen at work is to attend the Babbie Rural and Farm Learning Museum’s Homestead Festival on June 22-23, 2018. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, April 22, 2018

North Creek Farmers Market Returning

Adirondack Farm Produce - Photo by Shannon HoulihanA group of Johnsburg residents is working to bring the North Creek Farmers Market back this summer season. The market is set to be held Thursdays from 2 to 6 pm at Riverfront Park in North Creek, from June 21 through September 27, then on Columbus Day Weekend. It will be under and around the northern pavilion in Riverfront Park which is adjacent to the Depot Museum and train station. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 17, 2018

Food Justice Summit Planned For Wild Center

FJWG craigardenA Winter Food Justice Summit, “FEED BACK: Growing and Sharing the Abundance” is set to take place on Thursday, March 1, 2018 from 8 am to 6pm at the Wild Center in Tupper Lake. Organizers say the goal of this event is to create a road map toward a stronger local food system for everyone.

The March 1st Summit will include a keynote address by Andrianna Natsoulas, the Executive Director of the Northeast Organic Farming Association of New York (NOFA-NY). » Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 17, 2018

Thurman Maple Days Set For March

buckets on treesSugaring season is in full swing in Thurman. Thurman Maple Days are set to begin March 10 and 11, continuing Saturdays and Sundays through March 25. Five Thurman maple producers — four of them the largest in Warren County – will open their sugarhouses to show how this age-old art is practiced with the help of technological advancements.

Each weekend offers open barns at Adirondack Gold, Valley Road, Hidden Hollow, Toad Hill and Windy Ridge maple farms, all offering free tours of sugarbushes and sugarhouses, with demonstrations and talks about tapping, evaporating, filtering and candy-making. Toad Hill will offer wagon rides to the sugar bush through a traditional covered bridge. Windy Ridge will demonstrate sugaring done the old fashioned way, a pancake breakfast will be held at Valley Road, and Adirondack Gold Tapper’s will lead snowshoe hikes into the sugar bush. » Continue Reading.


Monday, February 12, 2018

Maple Confections: A Sweet And Local Valentine’s Gift

Maple Syrup and Confections Valentine’s Day. The day when, more than at any other time of the year, people declare feelings of romantic interest, love, and adoration for one another. This is most-often done with a card. Approximately 150 million Valentine’s Day cards will be exchanged in the US, this year; 2.6 billion worldwide (according to the Greeting Card Association).

The oldest known Valentine’s Day card, if you will, is still in existence. It’s a poem from Charles, Duke of Orleans, to his wife; written while he was imprisoned in the Tower of London in 1415, and preserved in the British Library in London. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 28, 2018

CSAs: Taking Control, Ownership of Our Food System

CSA veggiesIn this age of global markets and marketing, more often than not, the food we eat is grown on large industrial farms; then shipped across the country, or from central or South America, or overseas, to huge distribution centers, where it’s sorted, packaged, processed, and then trucked to chain supermarkets, convenient stores, and fast food outlets.

We seldom think about the environmental impacts resulting from expanded mechanization and transportation of foodstuffs over great distances; of the ecological consequences of large-scale mono-cropping of food with intensive use of pesticides; or the impacts that food globalization has on our health (e.g. 2/3 of Americans are now considered overweight or obese). » Continue Reading.


Thursday, January 18, 2018

ANCA Names Farmer-Producer Mini Grant Winners

Cherry tomatoes grown on Birdsfoot Farm and prepared for marketThe Adirondack North Country Association (ANCA) recently announced the recipients of its 2017 Farmer/Producer Mini Grant program, which provides funding to farmers and local food businesses whose projects streamline the farm to school supply chain.

Birdsfoot Farm and Fullers Farm, both of Canton, and Martin’s Farmstand of Potsdam are receiving awards as part of the new grant program that provides funding for small farm to school projects. All three grant recipients have experience providing farm products to St. Lawrence County schools, often through the North Country Grown Cooperative. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, January 4, 2018

Featured Farms at Wild Center in January

Adirondack Farm Produce - Photo by Shannon HoulihanOn Saturdays in January The Wild Center in Tupper Lake will celebrate local farmers who work to put wholesome food on the table every month of the year.

From 1 to 3 pm hear them tell their story, and enjoy food prepared by the Center’s cafe staff using farm-fresh products. Farmers will have items available for purchase.  The schedule of events follows: » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Whallonsburg Grange Holiday Market Dec 16th

Whallonsburg Grange HallThe Whallonsburg Grange Hall in Essex, have invited the public to its annual Holiday Market on Saturday, December 16 from 1 to 4 pm.

Fifteen local farms and food producers will have booths selling produce, fresh breads, meats, cheeses, jams and jellies, maple syrup, pickles, pies, candy and more. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Thanks For Giving

If the Pilgrims had only known what a big deal Thanksgiving was going to become in America they would undoubtedly have taken some pictures. Even the menu has been lost to us, although Wampanoag oral history, plus a few Pilgrim grocery receipts found at archeological sites, suggest there was corn, beans and squash as well as fowl and venison. Beyond that there may have been chestnuts, sun chokes (“Jerusalem” artichokes), cranberries and a variety of seafood.

Many historians believe the Pilgrims would have all perished during the winter of 1620 if not for food provided by the Wampanoags, whose land they appropriated. In the spring of 1621, Wampanoags gave the Pilgrims crop seeds, as well as a tutorial (possibly an App; we can’t be sure) on the production, storage and preservation of food crops such as corn, beans, and squash. » Continue Reading.


Monday, November 13, 2017

Keeseville ‘Farmacy’ Grand Opening Friday

farmacyAdkAction has announced the grand opening and ribbon cutting of the “Farmacy” fresh food retail space in the Keeseville Pharmacy on Friday, November 17th from 4 to 6 pm. A  reception with sweet and savory snacks and wine and beer will be held following the ribbon cutting at the Fresh and Fancy Bakery across the street. The ribbon cutting and reception are free and open to the public.

Keeseville is a hamlet that has had long stretches without a grocery store. The most recent has lasted about four years after Mac’s Market in the heart of downtown Keeseville closed down in 2013. In the center of Keeseville’s downtown is an empty 8,000 square foot grocery store that serves as a gnawing reminder that the closest grocery store is about 20 minutes away by car. Despite the limited access to fresh food in Downtown Keeseville, there is a budding agricultural community developing on the outskirts of the hamlet. A 40-acre organic vegetable farm, a grass-fed dairy, and a sustainable beef, pork, and chicken operation have all grown over the past few years. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Food Justice Summit Planned For March

FJWG craigardenThe newly formed North Country Food Justice Working Group is planning a winter food summit.

“Feed Back: Growing and Sharing the Abundance” will take place Thursday, March 1st, 2018 at the Wild Center in Tupper Lake.

What follows is an announcement sent to the press: » Continue Reading.


Saturday, October 21, 2017

A Great Pumpkin Prank; Pumpkin Production In NYS

McGraw hallMcGraw Hall, Cornell University’s first building, is certainly the most recognizable symbol of the University and, arguably, one of the state’s most iconic buildings. Built in 1891 and named for Jennie McGraw, a close family friend of University co-founder, Ezra Cornell. McGraw Hall’s clock tower, which houses the 21-bell Cornell Chimes; played three times a day and heard all over campus, stands 173-feet-tall, with an extremely steep 20-foot-high tiled roof-spire. It holds a commanding presence from vantage points all around the city of Ithaca.

So, on the morning of October 8, 1997, Cornell students, faculty, and staff were baffled when they awoke to find a rather large pumpkin, estimated to have weighed 60-pounds, impaled upon the spire atop the tower. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, October 15, 2017

Cultivating Mushrooms in the Adirondacks

I absolutely love mushrooms. They add real zest and excitement to all sorts of recipes. I’ve been cooking with them all of my adult life. They’re the perfect choice for hearty, intensely satisfying, really-good-for-you, low-calorie meals. Great if you’re watching your waistline!

It’s easy and fun to cultivate edible mushrooms using logs, stumps, or other mediums (i.e. straw, corn cobs), and the moist shade of your wooded property. Each mushroom variety offers its own unique, often nutty flavor. And they’re packed full of nutrients; things like B-vitamins, including riboflavin (an essential dietary nutrient which plays a major role in red blood cell formation and energy production, and strengthens the immune system), niacin (a digestive aid that can help maintain good blood circulation, healthy skin condition, and brain function), and pantothenic acid (one of the most versatile and flexible vitamins). » Continue Reading.



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