Posts Tagged ‘Moose’

Saturday, November 18, 2023

Northern Lights, fishing loons, and a lone muskrat

Northern Lights over Indian Lake

Here we are in the third week of November and there is no snow on the ground. The temperatures dipped low the last couple nights (18 [degrees] the first night, Nov. 12, and 12 [degrees] on Nov. 13) which put a skim of ice on the pond. There is a lone muskrat in the pond. [It] will be looking for a “get out of pond” card soon as there is no vegetation left for it to eat, as I pulled it all out. On the night of Nov. 6, there was a great show of the Northern Lights. Some folks in Indian Lake got a great photo which some friends sent [to] me.

Locally, some folks saw it [Northern Lights] over Seventh Lake, but no photos [were] taken (that I’ve seen.) Looking at the forecast [on] Saturday night [Nov. 11,] there was another show expected and my grandson. Nathan, and I were prepared to get out and get some shots. [Unfortunately,] that didn’t happen as the clouds never parted. It was [expected] to peak just after dark, but the clouds stayed overhead right through the night.

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Saturday, October 21, 2023

DEC, DMV alert motorists of animals’ most active season

Deer on roadside.

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) today reminded drivers to be aware that deer and moose are most active and more likely to enter public roadways this time of year, as they search for mates during their breeding season, which is the months of October, November and December.

According to the University at Albany’s Institute for Traffic Safety Management and Research, in 2022, 41.5 percent of the crashes between deer and vehicles occurred during this three-month span.

Motorists should also be on alert for moose on roadways in the Adirondacks and surrounding areas this time of year.

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Saturday, October 14, 2023

DEC announces photography contest featuring NY moose

Moose

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC) has recently announced a brand new photo contest for everyone to participate in. The theme—Moose. Specifically, NY Moose. So, if you have any photos of moose that you’d like to submit for the contest, continue reading.

How to enter: You can start submitting your photos of NYS moose now through November 10. The submission process for this contest is relatively simple. Follow this link: https://arcg.is/1KLyiX1 and fill out the form, along with uploading your photo to the form. We will be selecting our top 5 favorite photos, with 1 winner and 4 runners-up.
What do I win?: Our first place winner will have their photo included in an upcoming issue of the Conservationist, along with a free year subscription to the Conservationist, and copy of our New York State Wildlife Guide. Our four runners-up will also receive a free year subscription to the Conservationist, along with a copy of the wildlife guide.
Disclaimer: No small print. The NYS DEC is in no way taking ownership of your photos. Submitted images may be used for social media outreach and DEC agency materials, with credit attributed to the photographer.
Photo at top by Steve Spudie, provided by the NYS DEC.

Saturday, September 23, 2023

Moose on the Loose in the ADKs, Moose Fest happening this weekend

Star cactus

Hurricane Lee hit mainland, but it was in the Canadian Maritimes (still as a hurricane) with 80 MPH winds. The coastal areas of Massachusetts and Maine suffered some damage from the wind and waves putting out power and flooding water to the areas near the ocean. This area has been hit with every storm coming up the coast and storms coming across the nation, so they didn’t need any more water. It is still raining there today, September 18.

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Saturday, September 16, 2023

The Adirondack Canoe Classic, local plant sale, and roaming moose

90-Miler racers

The 6.8-magnitude earthquake in Morocco has killed over 2,100 people so far, with 2,500 more people injured. It has been hard for many of the mountain villages to get help with recoveries, buried in the rubble. Aftershocks have been happening, which is keeping people out on the streets and in open parks (away from buildings.) Then closer to home, the southern United States ducked a bullet when Category 5 Hurricane Lee turned north. [It stayed] out over the ocean, when it could have slammed the coast a terrible blow. It went from a tropical storm to a Category 5 [hurricane] in less than 24 hours, then swerved north. The wind from this storm will batter the east coastline all the way up into the Canadian Maritime provinces all week, with high waves and strong undertow currents.

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Saturday, July 8, 2023

Wildlife sightings out west: Bears, bison, coyotes, mountain goats, moose, deer and elk

 

Coyote

Arrived back in the Adirondacks today [Monday, July 3] after two days of being driven from West Yellowstone to Webster (and another four hours to get home from there today.) Made a stop at the Remsen bog on the way here and some of the showy lady’s slippers were still out. [I] also stopped to check on some of my Loons along the way. Some were still sitting, and others had hatched their chicks and were on the water with their young. So, if you are out and about on the water and see a family of Loons, give them some space and take pictures with a long lens.

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Wednesday, May 31, 2023

DEC invites all to report ADK moose sightings

Moose

If you are planning a trip to the Adirondacks, there is a chance that you could see a moose. DEC requests that any moose observations be reported through the Moose Sighting Report Form on DEC’s website. DEC uses this information to monitor the relative abundance and distribution of New York’s moose population and identify areas where additional population assessments may be warranted.

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Sunday, February 12, 2023

New York’s moose population steady, possibly growing

 

Moose in winter in NY

Moose have been present in the northern portion of New York since the Pleistocene (period of time spanning about 2.6 million to 11,700 years ago). However, by as early as the 1860s overhunting and habitat degradation had eliminated moose from New York. In response, a handful of small-scale moose restoration efforts were undertaken between 1870 and 1902 by private landowners and the NYS Fish, Forest and Game Commission, but were not successful. Over the next eighty years there were periodic moose sightings, but it wasn’t until 1986 that DEC staff documented a small population of resident moose in the Adirondacks that may have immigrated from Vermont, Massachusetts, or Quebec. Around 2010, it was thought that the population that started with only 6-11 individuals had grown to many as 400.

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Tuesday, October 18, 2022

DEC: Deer & moose more active during breeding season, keep watchful eye on roadways

Deer and moose are on the move. During the months of October, November, and December—breeding season for deer and moose—they become more active and are more likely to enter public roadways. Two-thirds of crashes between deer and vehicles occur during this three-month span. Motorists should also be alert for moose on roadways in the Adirondacks and surrounding areas this time of year.

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Saturday, October 15, 2022

Congratulations to son, Jason, two-time World Grand Champion in Kuk Sool

The beautiful Hunter’s full moon is bright outside my window tonight [October 9] after a day of wind and rain showers that took lots of leaves off the trees. There was still lots of color in the sunny patches as I drove home from The Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation annual celebration at the Paul Smith’s VIC. Events were held indoors, as it was pouring outside most of the day. Coming home, I hit showers and then sunny patches along the way. I saw lots of shutter bugs out taking advantage of the sunny spots.

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Monday, June 27, 2022

Recent DEC Hunting and Trapping News

DEC Seeking Reports of Moose Sightings:

DEC asks the public to report moose sightings via an online form as part of ongoing efforts to monitor moose distribution across New York. While the Adirondacks are home to most New York moose, some live in the eastern part of the state along the Vermont and Massachusetts borders. Moose can also occasionally be found in southeastern New York and the Catskills, but these are usually individuals that have dispersed from other areas.

Moose are the largest land mammal in the state. In the summer, when most sightings occur, moose typically spend a lot of time in ponds and wetlands feeding on submerged aquatic plants. During the rest of the year in cooler weather, they browse on leaves, twigs, and buds of trees and shrubs. Favored browse species include willows, birches, maples, balsam fir, viburnums, aspen, and mountain ash. Bulls weigh up to 1,200 pounds and stand up to six feet tall at the shoulder. Cows weigh anywhere from 500 to 800 pounds and usually give birth to one or two calves in late May or early June.

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Tuesday, February 1, 2022

DEC and Partners Launch Adirondack Moose Research Project

mooseThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) today announced the start of a new moose research project in the Adirondack region. This winter, 14 moose were fitted with GPS collars as part of a multi-year project assessing moose health and population. To safely capture, collar, and monitor these animals, DEC partnered with researchers at the New York Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and the College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University, the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY ESF), and Native Range Capture Services.

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Saturday, October 30, 2021

Drivers Urged to Be Alert for Moose in the Adirondacks

mooseIf you’re traveling to an outdoor destination this weekend be on the lookout for moose on the move. This time of year, moose are wandering looking for mates, leading them to areas where they are not typically seen. While this improves the opportunities for people to enjoy sightings of a moose, it also increases the danger of colliding with one on the roadway.

Moose are most active at dawn and dusk, which are times of poor visibility. They are also especially difficult to see at night because of their dark brown to black coloring and their height – which puts their head and much of their body above vehicle headlights.

Take the following precautions to prevent moose-vehicle collisions:

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Tuesday, August 31, 2021

Indian Lake Moose Festival returns for 11th year

cow moose and calf

Indian Lake N.Y.  – The Great Adirondack Moose Festival, New York State’s first ever moose themed festival, offers visitors of all ages a fantastic Adirondack experience.  Held in Indian Lake, N.Y. in the center of the famous Adirondack Park, moose themed programs will abound the weekend of September 25 and 26, 2021. 

Visitors to the Indian Lake region for the Moose Festival will enjoy programs, games, contests, exhibitions, guided hikes, shopping – all in the theme of the Moose.  The half-ton mammal is making a come-back in the Adirondacks, so one may even spot one during the weekend. The Great Adirondack Moose Festival (GAMF) is sponsored by the Indian Lake Chamber of Commerce and a host of regional and local business sponsors.

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Monday, July 19, 2021

Report Moose Sightings to DEC

mooseDEC asks the public to report moose sightings online as part of ongoing efforts to monitor moose across New York. While the Adirondacks are home to most New York moose, some live in the eastern part of the state along the Vermont and Massachusetts borders. Moose can also occasionally be found in southeastern New York and the Catskills, but these are usually individuals that have dispersed from other areas. In 2020, the public submitted over 250 moose observations to DEC, and approximately 50 have been reported so far this year.

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