Posts Tagged ‘muddy trails’

Thursday, March 7, 2024

DEC Issues Spring Conditions Advisory for Adirondacks

Mud Season Muddy Trail Adirondacks (Adirondack Mountain CLub Photo)

Hikers Advised to Avoid High Elevation Trails Due to Unstable Spring Conditions

On March 6, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) urged outdoor recreationists to postpone high elevation activities due to unstable spring conditions. With one of the warmest winters on record, current conditions are typically encountered in late-March to mid-April. Recreationists are advised to prepare for thinner snowpack on trails, deteriorating and variable depth snow alongside and off-trail, poor quality ice, slippery trails, and high-water crossings. As snow and ice continue to melt at high elevations, steep trails can pose a serious danger to hikers.

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Friday, April 15, 2022

NYS DEC issues annual muddy trail advisory for Adirondacks

Mud Season Muddy Trail Adirondacks (Adirondack Mountain CLub Photo)

Hikers advised to temporarily avoid high elevation trails and prepare for variable conditions on low elevation trails.

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) today urged hikers to postpone hikes on Adirondack trails above 2,500 feet until high elevation trails have dried and hardened. DEC advises hikers on how to reduce negative impacts on all trails and help protect the natural resources throughout the Adirondacks during this time.

High elevation trails: Despite recent warm weather, high elevation trails above 2,500 feet are still covered in slowly melting ice and snow. These steep trails feature thin soils that become a mix of ice and mud as winter conditions melt and frost leaves the ground. The remaining compacted ice and snow on trails is rotten, slippery, and will not reliably support weight. “Monorails,” narrow strips of ice and compacted snow at the center of trails, are difficult to hike and the adjacent rotten snow is particularly prone to postholing.

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