Posts Tagged ‘Nature Conservancy’

Thursday, November 7, 2019

Local Group Awarded Multi-Year Invasives Contract

APIPP logoThe Nature Conservancy’s Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) will continue its efforts to protect the region from invasive species — one of the greatest environmental threats facing the Adirondacks — under a new, multi-year contract with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) funded through the Environmental Protection Fund. » Continue Reading.


Friday, September 27, 2019

Featured Trail: Village Trail, Boquet River Nature Preserve

willsboro village trail courtesy adirondack atlasThe Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy has opened a half-mile trail connecting Willsboro’s Main Street with the Boquet River Nature Preserve’s existing trail network.

The trail provides convenient access to the Conservancy’s 120-acre preserve, and gives a further boost to the village’s ongoing downtown revitalization. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, June 23, 2019

Adk Nature Conservancy Adds Seasonal Staff

Nature Conservancy seasonal staff courtesy John DiGiacomoThe Nature Conservancy’s Adirondack Chapter has announced one Adirondack conservation associate, two freshwater stream barrier assessment technicians, and one invasive species management steward have been added to their summer staff.

The Conservancy’s Adirondack Conservation Associate program gives motivated young professionals a start in conservation through on-the-job experience. In addition to tackling a specific lead project, the associate is expected to work across departments to gain interdisciplinary experience from professional staff in conservation science, fundraising, environmental stewardship, and communications. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 9, 2019

Student Veterans Help Cleanup 120-Acre Boquet Preserve

TNC PSC students The Adirondack Chapter of the Nature Conservancy joined forces with a group of student veterans from Paul Smith’s College recently to hang trail signs, clear trash and perform other tasks to get the Boquet River Nature Preserve ready for the season.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, April 21, 2019

Visiting A Floodplain Forest

floodplain Visiting a forest along one of our major rivers, such as the Connecticut River, in late spring, is like entering a special world. Big silver maples tower overhead, with arching branches and roots reaching deep underground. Cottonwoods up to five feet in diameter and vase-shaped American elms are scattered about. Scars on the upstream side of some tree trunks bear testament to the chunks of ice that crash through when the river floods every spring. Silt stains on the trunks and dead leaves, trash, and other debris caught in crotches of trees show the height of the floodwaters. Many trees cannot withstand flooding, but the species in this forest are flood-tolerant and thrive in the nutrient-rich sediments brought by floods. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, November 11, 2018

New Communications, Engagement Director at Nature Conservancy

The Nature Conservancy has announced David Conlan has been named the new Director of Communications and Community Engagement of the organization’s Adirondack Chapter in Keene Valley.

Conlan most recently served as the Director of Client Services at Adworkshop, a digital marketing agency based in Lake Placid. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 18, 2018

PROTECT to Honor The Nature Conservancy Saturday

Whallonsburg Grange HallProtect the Adirondacks is set to hold its annual membership meeting at The Grange in Whallonsburg on Saturday July 21st. The annual meeting includes the Conservation and Advocacy report, financial report, membership report, and election to the Board of Directors. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 5, 2018

New Adirondack Invasive Species Awareness Campaign Launched

keep invasives outThe Nature Conservancy’s Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is set to celebrate its 20th anniversary by launching a new public awareness campaign focused on the simple steps Adirondack residents and visitors can take to prevent invasive species from spreading into the places they love.

The “Keep Invasive Species Out” campaign is centered around a new logo and a website, KeepInvasiveSpeciesOut.com that provides an overview of the problem and offers simple, preventive solutions for limiting the likelihood of unintentionally spreading an invasive. Tips are given for specific outdoor activities, including hiking, camping, boating, fishing, hunting, mountain biking, horseback riding, gardening/landscaping, and farming. The site is designed to provide information quickly and easily, and serves as a complement to APIPP’s longstanding website, adkinvasives.com. » Continue Reading.


Monday, February 26, 2018

APIPP: No New Aquatic Invasives Found In 2017

Adirondack lakes surveyed since 2002 and number of aquatic invasive species documented in each. For the first time in a decade, no new Adirondack lakes were reported to be infested by aquatic invasive species (AIS) by the Nature Conservancy’s Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP).

Nearly 75% of Adirondack lakes surveyed by APIPP for aquatic invasives were found to be invasive-free. 12 species were found to be present in interior lakes. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Boquet River Preserve Expands To Include Makers Guild

the vacant store on State Route 22 in Willsboro that will be transformed into a makerspace The Nature Conservancy purchased an additional 10 acres in Willsboro, structuring the transaction to protect forestland, enhance outdoor recreation, and make it possible for Makers Guild Inc., a new nonprofit, to acquire a former grocery store building.

In advance of the purchase, the Conservancy worked with the landowner — a commercial real estate broker — and the town zoning board to subdivide an 11-acre tract into two parcels, allowing for continued development in the town’s main travel corridor. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, December 2, 2017

New Book: Saving the Shawangunks

saving the shawangunksCarleton Mabee’s new book Saving the Shawangunk: The Struggle to Protect One of Earth’s Last Great Places (Black Dome Press, 2017) with foreword by Cara Lee of The Nature Conservancy takes a look at the grassroots fight to stop the construction of a 400-room hotel/conference center and 500 condominiums around Lake Minnewaska in New York State’s Shawangunk Mountains in the 1980s.

The authors argue that these efforts were a landmark victory for Hudson Valley environmentalists and became a blueprint for subsequent struggles to preserve open space against encroaching development. » Continue Reading.


Monday, November 20, 2017

LGLC Receives Grant from TNC, Dome Island Committee

lglc logoThe Lake George Land Conservancy (LGLC) has received a grant of $10,000 from The Nature Conservancy via its Dome Island Endowment, in support of the stewardship of Dome Island and other lands in the Lake George watershed.

The Nature Conservancy’s Dome Island Committee meets several times a year to review projects funded by past grants and advise future spending. Funds are sourced from an endowment that was created before John Apperson donated the 16-acre Dome Island in Bolton to The Nature Conservancy in 1956. John Apperson challenged The Nature Conservancy and the Lake George community to raise a $20,000 endowment to support stewardship of the property, which was to be protected in perpetuity.   » Continue Reading.


Monday, October 2, 2017

Critter Shelf for Adirondack Wildlife Pilot Project Underway

culvert critter shelf courtesy dotThe New York State Department of Transportation and The Nature Conservancy are piloting what is said to be the state’s first-ever “critter shelf” for wildlife. Installed this summer inside a large culvert under State Route 12, south of Boonville, in the Black River Valley, the suspended walkway provides a two-foot wide platform for wildlife to scurry through the culvert instead of crossing over the busy road. It is attached to one side of the corrugated steel culvert with brackets and cables.

While Route 12 is an important travel corridor, it can also be a dangerous obstacle for wildlife. Alternatively, wildlife attempting to cross also pose danger to drivers. The Route 12 culvert carries a stream that averages about three feet in depth under the road. The new shelf sits above water level so as not to impede flow, or compromise structural integrity. At 138 feet, it runs along the full length of the culvert and expands the potential for use by wildlife by providing dry passage for bobcats and other wildlife that don’t swim. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Peg Olsen to Lead TNC’s Adirondack Chapter

The Nature Conservancy has announced Peg Olsen as the Adirondack Chapter’s new director.  Olsen most recently served as The National Audubon Society’s Chief Conservation Officer and Atlantic Flyway Vice President, overseeing 23 state programs, including 46 nature centers, as well as international programs.

She is returning to The Nature Conservancy, where she worked from 1989 – 2003, holding various positions, including Eastern New York Chapter Director, overseeing a staff of 17, and Asia Pacific Region Deputy Director, managing operations with 185 staff across 14 times zones in China, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Micronesia, the Solomon Islands, Palau, Australia and the United States. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 13, 2017

New Adirondack Research On Invasive Phragmites

Lake Placid Wetland - Phragmites Management TimelapsePractitioners from the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) and researchers from Cornell University published the results of a seven-year study evaluating management of Phragmites australis (Phragmites), an aggressive wetland invasive plant, in the Adirondacks.

Published in the latest issue of Biological Invasions, “Management of invasive Phragmites australis in the Adirondacks: a cautionary tale about prospects of eradication,” documents broad success in controlling the species and suggests that over 70% of infestations within the interior Adirondacks will eventually be successfully eradicated, allowing native species to recolonize.

Since 2010, APIPP has managed 334 infestations of Phragmites in the interior Adirondacks. As of 2016, 212 of these managed sites have been documented as Phragmites-free; 104 have been documented as Phragmites-free for three consecutive years and are deemed eradicated. Researchers point to two primary reasons for this success: Small size of Phragmites infestations upon discovery (average size is less than one acre); and APIPP’s sustained early detection, rapid response, and monitoring efforts. » Continue Reading.