Posts Tagged ‘Noah John Rondeau’

Monday, August 15, 2016

Long Lake RondeauFest Line Up Set

grit n graceThe Town of Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department has announced the music line-up for the 5th annual RondeauFest Summer Music Fest in Long Lake, August 20th at the Mt. Sabattis Pavilion, 6 Pavilion Way, from 5 pm to 10 pm.

RondeauFest claims its name from Noah John Rondeau, a noted Adirondack hermit, who dwelled at Cold River Flow in the woods north of Long Lake off and on for over eighteen years from 1929 until 1950. Noah John Rondeau wrote in code, distanced himself from civilization and lived off the land through harsh winters. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, December 21, 2014

Exploring the Cold River Country

ADK Wilds for JohnAuthor William J. “Jay” O’Hern has once again shown himself to be a tireless researcher. While letters, journals and old newspapers and magazines are valuable to his work, Jay favors a more hands-on approach. A seasoned Adirondack adventurer himself, he has always preferred interviewing people with knowledge of his subjects. He likes to visit the places he writes about.

So it was that he and his wife Bette backpacked to the Cold River Valley for a trip that provides the framework for Adirondack Wilds: Exploring the Haunts of Noah John Rondeau (2014). Jay serves as a guide to who followed the same trails decades before. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, December 7, 2014

Adventures With Hermit Noah John Rondeau

The Hermit cover for JohnIn 1951, Dr. Roger D. Freeman found himself sharing a lean-to camp at Indian Falls in the Adirondack High Peaks of Essex County with none other than legendary Noah John Rondeau.

“I remember descending from Mt. Marcy to Indian Falls and I remember the rainstorm” that evening, said Doctor Freeman, who was taking a break from his studies at Colby-Swarthmore Summer School of Languages in Maine to traverse the Great Range in the Adirondacks. Freeman wished he had known the old woodsman he shared the shelter with was the famed Cold River hermit. “I didn’t learn that until much later,” he said. “He was friendly. He was an expert at building and keeping a fire going on a day when it rained.”

Freeman’s is just one of the stories in The Hermit and Us: Our Adventures with Noah John Rondeau (2014) by William J. O’Hern, which recalls the experiences of backpackers who visited Rondeau’s Cold River hermitage where he lived for over 30 years. » Continue Reading.


Friday, August 8, 2014

RondeauFest Scheduled For August 16th

Sons of Octomom 4The Town of Long Lake has announced the line up for the 3rd Annual RondeauFest Summer Music Event. The roster of acts include Alex Smith and the Mountain Sound, Terry Chaiken, Fade to Blues, Dogtown Cadillac and the Sons of Octomom. These regional Adirondack musicians will showcase a variety of music from rock, blues, country, mountain surf and folk. The event will be held August 16th from 4 to 10 pm at the Mt. Sabattis Pavilion in Long Lake.

Jennifer Raymond, formerly of Decadence, is the lead singer and band leader of Dogtown Cadillac. Jennifer calls Schroon Lake her hometown and country music her first love. Dogtown Cadillac features Tim Howe, Dickie Ogden and Archie Anderson from the South Glens Falls, and Albany area. » Continue Reading.


Monday, July 7, 2014

Search And Rescue Stories: Ranger Orville Betters

raquette fallsA striking old black and white photograph of a Forest Ranger posted on the NYSDEC Twitter feed recently caught my attention and captivated my imagination. The tweet read “Ranger w/pack basket putting up Canoe Carry Trail sign. Raquette Falls in the (Adirondacks) 1949.”

The ranger had a striking pose, wearing a Stetson, boots tightly laced half way to his knees. The ranger’s face was hidden from view, not surprising for a profession, that – especially then – toiled in the outdoors, their daily routine invisible to the public. I quickly tweeted back “Do you know who that is?”  Unfortunately no one did. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 16, 2011

Cracking Noah John Rondeau’s Code

On Saturday of Easter weekend, April 23, Dave Greene of Johnsburg and Syracuse will present a power point program in North Creek about how he broke the secret code of Noah John Rondeau (1883 to 1967), the Adirondack hermit who lived ten miles back in the wilderness for 30 years. Rondeau was sure no one would ever decipher his journals, which was written in a code simple enough for him to write in every day but which had some diabolical variations.

Like many hermits, Rondeau was very sociable and was well-loved by many mountain hikers and sportsmen who were glad to carry in food and other supplies for him in exchange for colorful stories and scratchy fiddling. They tried to avoid having to partake of his “everlasting stew”, however. Game wardens were definitely not welcome visitors.

At the age of 22, when Greene, just out of college, was living pretty much as a hermit himself at the foot of Crane Mt. in his family’s primitive cabin, he had time to focus on the puzzling “hen scratchings”. After just 22 hours of work, he had the gist of the code, though some problems and meanings of words remained mysterious. For a good description of Rondeau, the code and Greene’s work, see the February issue of the DEC Conservationist magazine, though the time frame given for breaking the code is not accurate.

The program, in which Greene will explain how he deciphered the code and also teach the audience how to do it , will be held at 7 p.m. in Tannery Pond Community Center, opposite the town hall/library on Main Street, North Creek. Donations will be accepted for the support of the Adirondack Lake Assessment Program (ALAP), a volunteer water monitoring project of Protect the Adirondacks, in partnership with the Adirondack Watershed Institute (AWI) of Paul Smiths College.

Photo courtesy Wikipedia.


Monday, November 16, 2009

Noah Rondeau: A Day in His Woods

Many an article and book is available describing the life of Noah Rondeau and his hermitage. Interactions with the few hikers who ventured into his area portrayed a favorable gentleman who loved the company of some people as well as his solitude. Pictures are worth a thousand words and attach emotion to the text. A walk to the site of the former hermitage, however, allows a person an even deeper perspective and appreciation for the “Last Adirondack Hermit” and his way of life. » Continue Reading.