Posts Tagged ‘Northville-Placid Trail’

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Some Strange News About Wildlife

This is a day for strange wildlife stories.

First I read in the Adirondack Daily Enterprise that hiker on the Northville-Placid Trail stabbed a bear that had been following her. The bear took off; she’s all right. Read the story here.

Then I read on the Times Union’s website that a bull moose had wandered into a backyard in Halfmoon, a suburb of Albany. State officials tranquilized the animal and planned to release it in the southern Adirondacks. Read the story here.

Finally, the Associated Press reports that a deer in Ellenburg jumped through one window of a moving vehicle and out the other. Unfortunately, things did not end well for the deer. Read the story here.

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Chainsaw Training on Sunday Near Albany

The Northville-Placid Trail Chapter of Adirondack Mountain Club is sponsoring a NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) approved 3-hour chain saw safety course on Sunday, April 29th, from noon to 3pm in Colonie, near Albany. This is the course that is required as a minimum chain saw training to obtain a chain saw certification for chain saw use on state land. This is for trail stewards and other trail workers who have chain saws and want to use them during the chain saw window from April 1 to May 24th each year.

the training will be held at the Littles Lake cabin in Colonie, at the south west corner of Route 377 (Van Rensselaer Blvd) and Route 378. Participants should bring their chain saws and safety equipment. The training will include outside hands on training. The cost is $30 and participants will receive a certificate of training to provide to the DEC forester for your section along with your first aid, blood borne pathogens and cpr certifications (not being provided at this course) that are needed for chain saw use on state land.

If you plan on attending contact Tom Wemett, Chair of the NPTrail Chapter at [email protected], or call 518-524-8875.


Kid next to water
Tuesday, December 13, 2011

Phil Brown: Rename West Canada Lake Wilderness

The West Canada Lake Wilderness deserves our respect. It is the second-largest officially designated Wilderness Area in the Adirondack Park (after the High Peaks Wilderness). As such, it’s a place where you can wander for days without seeing another soul.

This magnificent region encompasses 171,308 acres, with elevations ranging from 1,390 to 3,899 feet (on Snowy Mountain). It boasts 163 lakes and ponds and is the source of three major rivers (Indian River, Cedar River, and, naturally, West Canada Creek). The Northville-Placid Trail cuts through the heart of tract. All told, there are sixty-seven miles of trails and sixteen lean-tos. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, September 13, 2011

After Irene: Paddling The New Duck Hole

A few days after Hurricane Irene, I hiked to Duck Hole to see how the place looked after the breach of the old logging dam. Although the pond lost most of its water, there were streams running through the resultant mudflats and a pool remained at the base of the waterfall on east shore.

Earlier in the year, I had carried my canoe to Duck Hole and had a ball paddling around and admiring views of High Peaks. Now I wondered if anyone would ever want to bring a canoe to Duck Hole again.

Well, someone already has: Adirondack guide Joe Hackett. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, September 8, 2011

Some High Peaks Areas Reopen, NPT Trail Warning

The NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and the Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK) have reopened access to several High Peaks wilderness areas and facilities. The Eastern Zone of the High Peaks Wilderness and the Giant Mountain Wilderness have reopened, although the Dix Mountain Wilderness and several area trails remain closed. ADK has reopened the Adirondak Loj and Wilderness Campground at Heart Lake and the Johns Brook Lodge in the Johns Brook Valley.

Roads to those facilities were among several that were washed out when the remnants of Tropical Storm Irene slammed into the eastern slopes of the Adirondacks causing widespread damage and destruction, especially along the Ausable and Bouquet Rivers, into the Keene Valley, and the High Peaks. State Route 73 is now open between Lake Placid and Keene Valley, and may be accessed by taking Route 9N from Elizabethtown. Route 73 remains closed between the Hamlet of Keene Valley and the Route 9 intersection, but is expected to open by next weekend. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, September 1, 2011

Conditions Report From The Northville-Placid Trail

What follows is a guest post by Tom Wemmet Chair of the Northville-Placid Trail (NPT) Chapter of Adirondack Mountain Club and the webmaster for www.nptrail.org which features the latest trail conditions, hike planning help, and more. The Almanack asked Tom to tell us what he knows about conditions on the Northville-Placid Trail following this week’s storm.

Well, hurricane Irene certainly left her mark on the Adirondacks as roads, bridges and trails have been washed away and closed in many areas of the Eastern High Peaks. Irene also left her mark on the Northville-Placid Trail as part of the Duck Hole Dam breached with the result that Duck Hole Pond is dewatering. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 2, 2011

Northville-Placid Trail ADK Chapter Established

The newest chapter of the Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK) will focus on enhancing and promoting the Northville-Placid Trail (NPT).

The NPT, which stretches 133 miles through some of the wildest and most remote parts of the Adirondack Park, was the first trail project undertaken by ADK after it was formed in 1922. In November, Tom Wemett, a self-described “NPT fanatic,” launched a new Web site devoted to the trail. Tom also circulated a petition to create a new ADK chapter to help protect, preserve and promote the trail and to raise money to enhance and maintain it. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, February 13, 2011

Proposed ADK Chapter to Focus on Northville-Placid Trail

The Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK) may soon have a new chapter devoted to enhancing and promoting the celebrated Northville-Placid Trail (NPT).

The NPT, which stretches 133 miles through some of the wildest and most remote parts of the Adirondack Park, was the first trail project undertaken by the Adirondack Mountain Club after it was formed in 1922. In November, Tom Wemett, ADK Trails Committee member and a self-described “NPT fanatic,” launched a new website devoted to the Northville-Placid Trail. According to Wemett, the site has been very successful and well received by hikers as well as ADK and Department of Environmental Conservation staff. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 24, 2010

A New Website For The Northville Placid Trail

The Northville-Placid Trail Subcommittee of the Adirondack Mountain Club’s Trails Committee has announced the creation of a new website devoted to the Northville-Placid Trail (NPT).

The NPT, which stretches 133 miles through some of the wildest and most remote parts of the Adirondack Park, was the first project undertaken by the Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK) after it was formed in 1922. ADK publishes “Adirondack Trails: Northville-Placid Trail,” the definitive guide to the trail, which includes a detailed topographical map of the NPT. The website was developed by Tom Wemett, chair of the Northville-Placid Trail Subcommittee and a self-described “NPT fanatic.” » Continue Reading.


Saturday, September 5, 2009

8-Mile Reroute of Northville-Placid Trail Complete

A reroute of the Northville Placid Trail has been completed by Adirondack Mountain Club professional trail crews (under contract with DEC) to move the trail off Cedar River Road and into the Blue Ridge Wilderness; the trail has been constructed, marked, and is now open for public use. Although others are planned, this is the first of the DEC’s road-to-trail projects to be implemented on the Northville-Placid Trail.

Previously, the trail followed the Cedar River Road for 6.6 miles between Wakely Dam and the former McCane’s Resort in the Town of Indian Lake, Hamilton County. The new trail section – eliminating all but 0.7 miles of road walking – passes through old growth forest of sugar maple, yellow birch, hemlock and red spruce. » Continue Reading.



Kid next to water

Wait, before you go,

sign up for news updates from the Adirondack Almanack!