Posts Tagged ‘NYS Conservation Council’

Sunday, June 6, 2021

Adirondack Council Recognizes DEC Commissioner Seggos

encon commissioner basil seggos holding picture

The Adirondack Council presented NYS Environmental Conservation Commissioner Basil Seggos with a framed photograph of the Adirondack Great Range on Wednesday as a token of its appreciation for the commissioner’s efforts to improve the management of visitors to and sustain the success of the High Peaks Wilderness Area and other popular destinations in the Adirondack Park.

“The commissioner and his DEC team have taken multiple important steps over the last year to improve the way the state is managing the flow of people and automobiles, address the negative impacts of overuse on visitor safety, natural resources, and wilderness, and provide new and improved access to the Adirondack Forest Preserve,” said Adirondack Council Executive Director William C. Janeway said. “We want to recognize the momentum he has established, applaud the state for starting to ramp up investments in a sustainable future for this national treasure we all love — and encourage continued progress.”

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 12, 2016

Conservation Council Report On 2016 Legislative Action

NYS CapitolThe 2016 New York State Legislative regular session has ended.

According to a statement issued by the New York State Conservation Council, “the 2016 session ended with very little legislation of concern to the sportsmen reaching the floor of both houses of the legislature for an actual vote.”  The Conservation Council recently highlighted the following Adirondack related bills in an e-mail sent to the organization’s supporters. » Continue Reading.


Monday, May 16, 2016

Conservation Council President On Managing ‘Forever Wild’ Lands

Wilderness around Fulton Chain from Castle Rock above Blue Mountain Lake

At a recent meeting I attended with other sportsmen, outdoor advocates and various environmental professionals, the topic of balance among the concerns of our lands and forests, wildlife, and people was being discussed.

From the perspective of the New York State Conservation Council, there is nearly a complete loss of balance on state lands in the Adirondacks because of an overbearing philosophy within the forest preserve, the forever wild philosophy, and wilderness and wild forest classifications. Thus the carrying capacity for song birds, wild game and other species in the Adirondacks is severely lacking. » Continue Reading.


Monday, April 25, 2016

Proposed Law Would Allow Trapping Of Adirondack Coyotes With Cable Snares

A Cable Restraint Caught Coyote in MissouriLegislation is now pending in the New York State Legislature to allow the use of cable snares, also known as cable restraint devices, to trap coyotes in the northern hunting zone, which includes the Adirondacks. The New York State Conservation Council has been actively lobbying for the bill’s passage.

The Senate Environmental Conservation Committee has reported bill S2953-C, sponsored by Senator Robert Ortt (R,C,I – North Tonawanda), and it is on the floor calendar. Assembly companion bill A9462-A, sponsored by Assemblyman William Magee (D-Nelson), is currently pending in the Assembly Environmental Conservation Committee. » Continue Reading.


Monday, November 24, 2014

Monroe, Siy Push Mandatory Park-wide Boat Inspections

5a4Local governments, lake and landowners associations, sportsmen and environmental protection organizations want to see Lake George’s program of mandatory inspections of trailered boats adopted throughout the Adirondack Park.

According to Fred Monroe, a Warren County Supervisor, and Eric Siy, the executive director of The Fund for Lake George, who convened a meeting of Adirondack Park stakeholders in Chestertown earlier this month, prevention is the only way to protect Adirondack lakes from invasive species and preserve an economy based on recreation.

“What were once the mainstays of the Adirondack economy, such as forestry and mining, are either gone or disappearing,” said Monroe.  “What’s left is tourism, which is so clearly tied to the health of the waters. If we lose the waters, we have nothing.” » Continue Reading.