Posts Tagged ‘NYS DEC’

Tuesday, August 16, 2022

Woman injured by horse, a biker suffers concussion on Lewis County trails

forest ranger reportTown of Watson
Lewis County
Mountain Bike Accident:
 On Aug. 8 at 3:30 p.m., Forest Ranger Evans responded to a call for a mountain biker who suffered a concussion on the Otter Creek Horse Trail approximately one-half mile from the trailhead. When Ranger Evans reached the 54-year-old from Pennsylvania, the subject was complaining of injuries to his knees and elbows and had no memory of what happened.

The subject’s party indicated that he had hit a maple syrup line causing his ejection from the bike. Ranger Evans provided first aid and did a spinal assessment. Ranger Hanno, ECO Jarecki, and Martinsburg Fire helped transport the subject to a Lewis County Search and Rescue ambulance. Resources were clear at 5 p.m.

 

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Sunday, August 14, 2022

DEC to Open Wildlife Management Areas from Aug. 16 to 31

dec logoOn Monday, August 8, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced the annual opening to the public of otherwise restricted Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) in Jefferson and St. Lawrence counties from Tuesday, Aug. 16, to Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2022. During the 16-day open house, Upper and Lower Lakes and Wilson Hill WMAs in St. Lawrence County, including the posted refuge or wetland restricted areas, will be open to visitors each day from sunrise to sunset. Perch River WMA in Jefferson County will also be open to visitors with one exception-Perch Lake will be open daily from noon to sunset.

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Friday, August 12, 2022

Outdoor Conditions (8/12): Limited water sources for High Peaks hikers due to heat, low rainfall

outdoor conditions logoThe following are only the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for a full list of notices, including seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

NEW THIS WEEK:

High Peaks Wilderness: Due to heat and low rainfall across the High Peaks, hikers and backpackers should not assume all water sources are available for obtaining drinking water from, including those on the Great Range trail, water along the Giant/ Rocky Peak traverse, and along the Sun Mountain loop.

Siamese Ponds Wilderness: The 35ft bridge over the Botheration Pond outlet on the Botheration Pond Loop Trail has been replaced with a brand new bridge.

Lake George Wild Forest: Palmer Pond trailhead parking lot will be closed Monday, August 8 – Tuesday, August 16 for a culvert replacement. To allow space for equipment and materials, please do not park in the parking lot or along the access road.

LAST WEEK:

Pharaoh Lake Wilderness: A bridge on the Pharaoh Lake Trail from the Pharaoh Lake Road trailhead is out. Hikers should be prepared for an open water crossing.

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Tuesday, August 9, 2022

Rangers respond to lean-to fire on Alger Island, wildland fire east of Pharaoh Lake

forest ranger reportTown of Indian Lake
Hamilton County
Wilderness Rescue:
 On July 28 at 8 p.m., Forest Rangers Miller, Nally, and Thompson responded to a report of a hiker lost on OK Slip Falls. Cell phone coordinates put the 37-year-old from Corinth near Whortleberry Pond, approximately two miles west of OK Slip Falls. After checking the trail register and confirming he was planning to hike OK Slip Falls, Rangers started searching trails in that area.

Ranger Thompson found fresh tracks on a trail heading towards Whortleberry Pond. At 11 p.m. Rangers made voice contact with the hiker who took a wrong trail early in the hike and became turned around. When it was dark, he stopped, built a fire, and called for help. At 11:40 p.m., Rangers located the subject in good condition and walked with him to the trailhead. Resources were clear at 2:07 a.m.

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Monday, August 8, 2022

ADK Park: Recent Environmental Conservation Police News

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s (DEC) Division of Law Enforcement enforces the 71 chapters of New York State’s Environmental Conservation Law (ECL), protecting fish and wildlife and preserving environmental quality across New York. In 1880, the first eight Game Protectors proudly began serving to protect the natural resources and people of New York State.

In 2021, 282 Environmental Conservation Police Officers (ECOs) and Investigators across the state responded to 26,207 calls and worked on cases that resulted in 11,562 tickets or arrests for violations ranging from deer poaching to solid waste dumping, illegal mining, the black market pet trade, and excessive emissions violations.

 

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Friday, August 5, 2022

Outdoor Conditions (8/5): Hikers should be aware of open water crossing on Pharaoh Lake Trail

outdoor conditions logoThe following are only the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for a full list of notices, including seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

NEW THIS WEEK:

Pharaoh Lake Wilderness: A bridge on the Pharaoh Lake Trail from the Pharaoh Lake Road trailhead is out. Hikers should be prepared for an open water crossing.

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Tuesday, August 2, 2022

Rangers locate murder suspect in Tupper Lake, search all-night for man and four children found in a Herkimer County drainage

forest ranger reportTown of Caroga
Fulton County
Wheeled Litter Training:
 On July 25, Forest Ranger Lieutenant Kerr and Rangers Nally and Thompson provided wheeled litter training at the Caroga Lake Volunteer Fire Department’s monthly meeting.

Rangers demonstrated how to package a patient into a litter and, with the use of Speculator Fire Department’s litter wheel, Rangers instructed attendees on its installation, use, and rescue application. Fire department members practiced using the wheel on uneven terrain and steep slopes while Rangers demonstrated simple litter belay techniques.

Caroga Lake Fire Department and surrounding mutual aid departments are frequently called upon to assist in wilderness search and rescues in Fulton and Hamilton counties. Continued training and becoming familiar with equipment helps keep personnel prepared for technical wilderness rescues and maintains critical interagency relationships for emergency response in the backcountry.

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Friday, July 29, 2022

Outdoor Conditions (7/29): Staying Hydrated, Recognizing Signs of Heat-Related Illness

outdoor conditions logoThe following are only the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for a full list of notices, including seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

New This Week:

Santa Clara Conservation Easement: The southern spur off the CP3 route loop is currently closed to motorized users. Due to a logging operation on the property, users accessing the easement should reduce speed and exercise caution both on the Brown Track Road and on the easement roads in that area. Anglers are advised not to use the northern of the 2 fishing sites on the CP3 route as trucks will be crossing that bridge regularly.

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Tuesday, July 26, 2022

Rangers assist lost, dehydrated hikers in Essex, Franklin Counties, hiker suffering a seizure near Flowed Lands Lake

forest ranger reportTown of North Elba
Essex County
Wilderness Rescue: On July 20 at 7:15 a.m., Northern Frontier Camp of Indian Lake contacted Ray Brook Dispatch to report a 17-year-old camper having a seizure near the Flowed Lands Lake. The camper from Delaware was attempting to hike 22 High Peaks in approximately one week. Forest Rangers Evans and Martin responded with the Lake Colden caretaker.

The caretaker reached the subject at the Herbert Brook lean-to and brought them to the Lake Colden Outpost for possible aviation evacuation. At 10:38 a.m., New York State Police (NYSP) Aviation landed at Lake Colden where Rangers helped the subject into the helicopter, which brought the camper to the hospital for further treatment.

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Monday, July 25, 2022

DEC Proposes Improvements to State’s Forest Tax Law Program

dec logo

Public Comment Period on Proposed New and Improved Regulations Now through September 19; Two Virtual Public Comment Hearings Scheduled for September 13

On July 13, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos announced proposed changes to the implementing regulations for Real Property Tax Law Section 480a, also known as the Forest Tax Law. The comprehensive overhaul of these nearly 50-year-old regulations will lessen the administrative burden on participating forest landowners, help DEC promote compliance with requirements in place, and maintain and improve sustainable timber management on enrolled lands.

“The Forest Tax Law Program provides private forest landowners a significant real property tax reduction on enrolled forest lands in exchange for managing their timber resource for the long-term with the support of professional foresters,” said Commissioner Seggos. “Privately owned forests make up to 74 percent of the total forest land area in New York, and healthy, well-managed forests are essential for supporting our economy, protecting water and air quality, providing wildlife habitat, and improving forest carbon storage and sequestration, supporting the State’s climate efforts.”

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Monday, July 25, 2022

DEC seeks public’s help reporting Asian Longhorned Beetle sightings

Adult Asian Longhorned Beetles (ALB) are active from late July through September. The ALB (Anoplophora glabripennis) is an invasive wood-boring insect that feeds on a variety of hardwoods including maple, birch, elm, ash, poplar, horsechestnut, and willow, among others.

Native to China and Korea, the beetles are approximately 1.5 inches long and shiny black, with white spots on their wing cases. They have black and white antennae that can be up to twice as long as their body. (They should not be confused with the native white-spotted pine sawyer, which has a distinctive white spot on their back, below their head.)

If they are in your neighborhood, it’s possible one will end up in your pool. The more “eyes” we have looking for infestations, the better chance of finding new ones early and eliminating them. ALB attacks and kills hardwoods, and they emerge from infested trees in the late summer to find a new host.

The DEC invites pool owners to check filters for the invasive insect regularly and submit a report if any are found. YOU are the key to keeping our forests free of ALB.

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Friday, July 22, 2022

Outdoor Conditions (7/22): Temporary Lake Placid Ironman road closures may affect travel to popular trailheads

outdoor conditions logoThe following are only the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for a full list of notices, including seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

NEW THIS WEEK

Lake Placid Ironman: The Lake Placid Ironman is this Sunday, July 24. Lane and road closures along the course may affect travel to popular trailheads in the Lake Placid, Keene, and Wilmington regions. Temporary road closures will begin at 5 a.m. Check the race course to see how your travel may be affected and make alternate trip plans if necessary.

Adirondack Rock Climbing: DEC closes certain rock climbing routes in the Adirondacks to protect nesting peregrine falcons. Once peregrine nest sites are determined, climbing routes that will not disturb nesting are reopened. Routes that remain closed reopen after the young have fledged. As of 07/19/22, all rock climbing routes are open. Thank you for your cooperation.

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Thursday, July 21, 2022

ADK Park: Environmental Conservation Police News

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s (DEC) Division of Law Enforcement enforces the 71 chapters of New York State’s Environmental Conservation Law (ECL), protecting fish and wildlife and preserving environmental quality across New York.

In 1880, the first eight Game Protectors proudly began serving to protect the natural resources and people of New York State.

In 2021, 282 Environmental Conservation Police Officers (ECOs) and Investigators across the state responded to 26,207 calls and worked on cases that resulted in 11,562 tickets or arrests for violations ranging from deer poaching to solid waste dumping, illegal mining, the black market pet trade, and excessive emissions violations.

All Hooked Up – St. Lawrence County
On July 4, ECO Atwood responded to a call about a small goose with a fishing lure stuck in its foot in the town of Colton.

 

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Wednesday, July 20, 2022

Rangers assist lost and injured hikers, rafting guide who suffered heart attack near Blue Ledges Beach

forest ranger reportTown of North Hudson
Essex County
Wilderness Rescue:
 On July 11 at 9:40 p.m., Forest Rangers Arnold and Quinn responded to help two hikers stranded on the East Mill Flow Trail. The 21- and 17-year-olds misjudged the distance from their campsite to Round Pond from Sharp Bridge Campground, and couldn’t find their way back in the dark. The pair from Mineville called 911, but the call dropped before they could share information.

At 10:35 p.m., Ranger Quinn located the subjects one mile from the campground. Rangers provided headlamps and helped the hikers back to the campground. Resources were clear at 11:25 p.m.

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Wednesday, July 20, 2022

DEC Seeks Citizen Scientists to Help Monitor Turkey Productivity

wild turkey - femaleNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos today encouraged New Yorkers to take part in the State’s annual survey of wild turkeys, a valuable tool that helps DEC determine the productivity of turkey populations statewide.

“Citizen scientists provide important data that helps our biologists examine how factors such as weather, predation, and habitat conditions during the breeding and brood-rearing seasons impact turkey survival,” Commissioner Seggos said. “Without the assistance of our volunteers, the task of monitoring turkey populations statewide would be far more difficult, and we encourage participation this summer to help enhance our knowledge of turkeys in New York.”

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