Posts Tagged ‘NYS DEC’

Wednesday, July 6, 2022

Rangers respond to ankle injury reports at Schroon Falls, Azure Mountain

forest ranger report

Town of Schroon
Essex County
Wilderness Rescue:
On July 2 at approximately 5 p.m., Forest Ranger Quinn responded to a report of a subject with a compound ankle fracture at Schroon Falls.

The North Hudson Fire Department, Schroon Lake Fire Department, and EMS helped Ranger Quinn carry the 46-year-old from Long Island to a waiting ambulance. Schroon Lake EMS transported the subject to Frontier Town, where a helicopter transported the subject to the hospital.

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Friday, July 1, 2022

Outdoor Conditions (7/1): Campers encouraged to use bear-resistant canisters

outdoor conditions logoThe following are only the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information web pages for a full list of notices, including seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

Last Week:

Silver Lake Wilderness: Working with our partners at the Adirondack Mtn Club, a volunteer trail crew recently helped close and relocate two primitive tent sites from the south shore of Woods Lake to the north shore. The objective of the project was to spread out use and improve camping opportunities for NPT thru-hikers. This project was part of a larger trail work effort that ADK Mtn Club organized on June 4, National Trails Day.

 

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Thursday, June 30, 2022

DEC seeks public input to address adverse impacts of informal trails on Catskill High Peaks

On June 29, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos announced that DEC is working to help protect natural resources by identifying management solutions to address the adverse impacts of the expansion of informal trail networks on Catskill High Peaks (over 3,500 feet) previously considered to be ‘trailless.’ Informal trails created over time are having an impact and consistent with the Catskill Strategic Planning Advisory Group’s (CAG) preliminary recommendations to address increased public use in the region, DEC is seeking public input in this preliminary stage of management plan development.

“DEC is conducting a multi-year monitoring effort that is already identifying management concerns on many of these Catskill High Peaks,” said Commissioner Seggos. “DEC will be working outside of the conventional unit management planning process to develop a single document that will outline intervention strategies to help address adverse impacts in multiple areas as quickly as possible. We will be providing a variety of opportunities for public participation, including a public information session in the fall once the 2022 field monitoring season is complete.”

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Wednesday, June 29, 2022

Hiker lost for days in Dix Range; hiker dies on Cascade

forest ranger report

Town of North Hudson
Essex County
Wilderness Rescue:
 On June 22 at 9 a.m., Ray Brook Dispatch requested Forest Ranger assistance in the Dix Range with the search for a 58-year-old from Singapore last heard from on June 19 at approximately 8 p.m. The hiker was communicating with his wife in Singapore while in New York for a week, but when she did not hear from him, she called for help.

Rangers found the subject’s rental car in the Elk Lake parking lot at 9:30 a.m. The subject signed in at the trail register but did not sign out. Rangers Lewis and Martin set up a search plan with the expectation the subject was off-trail. Nine additional Rangers joined the search along with New York State Police Aviation. At 2:50 p.m., Ranger Scott located the subject in a swampy area.

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Monday, June 27, 2022

Recent DEC Hunting and Trapping News

DEC Seeking Reports of Moose Sightings:

DEC asks the public to report moose sightings via an online form as part of ongoing efforts to monitor moose distribution across New York. While the Adirondacks are home to most New York moose, some live in the eastern part of the state along the Vermont and Massachusetts borders. Moose can also occasionally be found in southeastern New York and the Catskills, but these are usually individuals that have dispersed from other areas.

Moose are the largest land mammal in the state. In the summer, when most sightings occur, moose typically spend a lot of time in ponds and wetlands feeding on submerged aquatic plants. During the rest of the year in cooler weather, they browse on leaves, twigs, and buds of trees and shrubs. Favored browse species include willows, birches, maples, balsam fir, viburnums, aspen, and mountain ash. Bulls weigh up to 1,200 pounds and stand up to six feet tall at the shoulder. Cows weigh anywhere from 500 to 800 pounds and usually give birth to one or two calves in late May or early June.

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Saturday, June 25, 2022

ADK Park: Recent Environmental Conservation Police News

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s (DEC) Division of Law Enforcement enforces the 71 chapters of New York State’s Environmental Conservation Law (ECL), protecting fish and wildlife and preserving environmental quality across New York. In 1880, the first eight Game Protectors proudly began serving to protect the natural resources and people of New York State. In 2021, 282 Environmental Conservation Police Officers (ECOs) and Investigators across the state responded to 26,207 calls and worked on cases that resulted in 11,562 tickets or arrests for violations ranging from deer poaching to solid waste dumping, illegal mining, the black market pet trade, and excessive emissions violations.

Drone Training – Oneida County

From June 2 to 5, members of DEC’s Division of Law Enforcement drone team, along with New York State Police and the Town of Colonie Police Department, presented at the 2022 New York State Technical Rescue Conference at the State Preparedness Training Center in Oriskany. ECOs presented on the critical role of drones during investigations. ECOs demonstrated scenario-based and hands-on drone training, ranging from hazmat responses and emergency operations, to structural collapse situations and flooded environments. This is the first time drones were a topic of discussion at the conference.

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Friday, June 24, 2022

Outdoor Conditions (6/24):Customizing a first aid kit

outdoor conditions logoThe following are only the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information web pages for a full list of notices, including seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

New This Week:

High Peaks Wilderness: Expect muddy conditions above 3,000 feet in elevation. Expect poor traction and slow progress on steep sections of trail with wet rock. Due to recent rains, high elevation water sources are available to replenish water supplies – bring and use proper filtration devices. Water crossings may be high and fast-moving.

Silver Lake Wilderness: Working with our partners at the Adirondack Mtn Club, a volunteer trail crew recently helped close and relocate two primitive tent sites from the south shore of Woods Lake to the north shore. The objective of the project was to spread out use and improve camping opportunities for NPT thru-hikers. This project was part of a larger trail work effort that ADK Mtn Club organized on June 4, National Trails Day.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 22, 2022

Rangers assist with wilderness searches, fire in Black Brook

forest ranger reportTown of North Elba
Essex County
Wilderness Search:
 On June 16 at 4:55 p.m., Forest Rangers Curcio, Lewis, and Praczkajlo responded to a report of a hiker with an ankle injury on Algonquin Peak. Rangers reached the 30-year-old subject from Virginia at 6:55 p.m. and splinted her injury.

Rangers then helped the subject down the mountain. The hiker reached her vehicle at 8:45 p.m.

Town of North Elba
Essex County
Wilderness Search:
 On June 16 at 7:50 p.m., Ray Brook Dispatch requested Forest Ranger assistance in the response to a 22-year-old from Pennsylvania who had suffered a head injury in Avalanche Pass.

By 9 p.m., Ranger Curcio made contact with the individual and her hiking group not far from Marcy Dam. Ranger Curcio assisted the group back to the trailhead and suggested the subject seek further medical attention. Resources were clear at 10:05 p.m.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 21, 2022

DEC announces 2022 ‘I BIRD NY’ challenges

Birder at Washington County Grasslands provided by DECOn June 17, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos announced the start of the 2022 “I BIRD NY” challenges for beginning and experienced birders. Two levels of challenges provide the opportunity to identify birds and learn about birdlife and offer a chance to win birding equipment. With the launch of many New York State Birding Trail segments this year, DEC will be increasing the chances of winning if participants find birds on a New York State Birding trail site.

“No matter where you live, birdwatching is a fun, easy, affordable activity that can be enjoyed by people of all ages, abilities, identities, and backgrounds,” said Commissioner Seggos. “This summer is a great time to start birding or take your birding skills to the next level by observing birds in the diverse variety of habitats and locations the New York State Birding Trail offers.”

New York State’s wide-ranging habitat types, from the Atlantic Ocean’s sandy beaches to majestic Catskill and Adirondack peaks, Great Lakes shorelines, and everything in between create a birder’s paradise that supports more than 450 different bird species throughout the year. New York offers a wide variety of options in Birding Trail locations with ongoing new sites being added, making it even easier for New Yorkers to get started with this fun activity.

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Monday, June 20, 2022

National Pollinator Week is June 20 – 26

Pollinator Week is June 20-26. It is an annual celebration in support of pollinator health, established and managed by Pollinator Partnership. This week is a prime time to raise awareness for pollinators and also to spread the word about what people can do in order to protect them. Those interested are encouraged to celebrate Pollinator Week get involved by taking part in a variety of activities such as planting for pollinators, hosting garden tours, participating in online bee and butterfly ID workshops, and more.

Fast facts from the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation:

  • Pollinators are essential to our environment, and they provide an ecological service for the reproduction of over 85% of the world’s flowering plants, including more than two-thirds of the world’s crop species.
  • The U.S. alone grows more than 100 crops that either need or benefit from pollinators.
  • The economic value of native pollinators is estimated at $3 billion per year in the U.S.
  • Pollinators are keystone species in most terrestrial ecosystems. Fruits and seeds derived from insect pollination are a major part of the diet of approximately 25% of all birds and of mammals.

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Saturday, June 18, 2022

DEC, State Parks Announce 2022 Outdoor Photo Contest

hiker finds a moment of solitude on Giant Mountain during a busy weekendOn June 16, the state’s Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (State Parks) and Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced the launch of the 2022 Outdoor Photo Contest to highlight the best of New York’s natural beauty and special destinations among New York’s state campgrounds and parklands. The online contest runs for four months–through mid-October–with the winning images to be featured in statewide digital and print campaigns.

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Friday, June 17, 2022

Outdoor conditions (6/17): Hypothermia, a Year-Round Risk

outdoor conditions logoThe following are the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for comprehensive and up-to-date information on seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

NEW THIS WEEK:

Ferris Lake Wild Forest: Powley Road is open. All washouts have been repaired.

Speculator Tree Farm and Perkins Clearing: All roads and campsites are now open to the public. Old Military Road has been repaired and the Pillsbury Mountain Fire Tower parking area is open.

Flatrock Mountain Conservation Easement: The area south of Flatrock Mountain, including the gated logging road, will be temporarily closed to public access for timber harvesting by the landowner.

LAST WEEK:

Muddy Trails Advisory: DEC has lifted the Muddy Trails Advisory for trails above 2,500 feet in elevation. Some trails may still be muddy, especially at higher elevations. Please help reduce trail widening and erosion by walking through mud instead of around it.

Saranac Lakes Wild Forest: The access road to Saint Germain and Meadow Ponds has been repaired and is open.

 

General Notices

Visit the main Adirondack Backcountry Information page for more trip-planning resources, including travel information, weather resources, and seasonally-specific information about Adirondack recreation.

Know Before You Go (06/16): Be prepared for cooler temperatures this weekend. Daytime highs on Saturday are only expected to reach the mid-50s in places, with Sunday highs creeping into the mid-60s. Temperatures on mountain summits will be significantly colder, with high elevations approaching freezing. Dress in layers and bring rain gear. Take caution as stream, river, and other water crossings may swell following rain. Continue to pack bug spray, bug nets, and other methods of protecting from bites, as well as sun protection. Plan on arriving at your destination early and have several back-up plans in place in case parking at your desired location is full.

Check the Weather: Check the forecast for your destination and pack and plan accordingly. Check the National Weather Service Northern Adirondacks and Southern Adirondacks Mountain Point Forecasts for select summit forecasts. Check both daytime and nighttime temperatures and remember that temperatures will drop as you gain elevation.

Fire Danger: Check the fire rating map.

Water Conditions: Water levels throughout the Adirondack region are generally average for this time of year, with select waterways measuring slightly above or slightly below average. Check the USGS Current Water Data for New York for stream flow of selected waters. Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs aka lifejackets) are strongly recommended to be worn.

Hiking with Dogs: Dogs hiking in warm temperatures are at risk of experiencing heat exhaustion and death. If your dog does collapse, quickly move to create shade for the dog and cool their feet and stomach – this is the most effective way to help an overheated dog. The best way to protect your pet is to leave them at home.

Ticks: Wear light-colored clothing with a tight weave to spot ticks easily. Wear enclosed shoes, long pants, and a long-sleeved shirt. Tuck pant legs into socks or boots and shirt into pants. Check clothes and any exposed skin frequently for ticks while outdoors. Consider using insect repellent. Stay on cleared, well-traveled trails and walk in the center of trails. Avoid dense woods and bushy areas. Additional tips for tick prevention.

Bear Canisters Required: NYSDEC requires the use of bear-resistant canisters by overnight users in the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness between April 1 and November 30. NYSDEC encourages campers to use bear-resistant canisters throughout the Adirondack backcountry. Bear canisters should be used to store all food, food garbage, toiletries, and other items with a scent. Canisters should be stored a minimum of 100ft from tents, lean-tos, and cooking sites and kept closed whenever they are not being accessed. Learn more about bear canisters and avoiding human-bear conflicts.

Adirondack Rock Climbing Closures: DEC closes certain rock climbing routes in the Adirondacks to protect nesting peregrine falcons. For a full list of closures, visit Adirondack Rock Climbing Route Closures. Once peregrine nest sites are determined, climbing routes that will not disturb nesting will be reopened. Routes that remain closed will reopen after the young have fledged. Thank you for your cooperation. For more information please contact the Bureau of Wildlife at (518) 623-1240.

Adirondack Mountain Reserve: Parking reservations will be required May 1 through Oct. 31 for single-day and overnight access to the parking lot, trailheads, and trails located on the privately owned, 7,000-acre AMR property in the town of Keene in the High Peaks region. For a list of frequently asked questions and to register, visit AMR’s website.

Safety & Education

Spring is in full swing. Whether you’re going for a hike, a bike, a paddle, or fishing, Hike Smart NY can help you prepare with a list of 10 essentials, guidance on what to wear, and tips for planning your trip with safety and sustainability in mind.

Hypothermia: A Year-Round Risk

Hypothermia during warm weather months happens more often than one may think. Hypothermia occurs when your body’s core temperature drops. Signs of hypothermia include:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion or drowsiness
  • Confusion
  • Loss of feeling and dexterity in your extremities
  • A negative change in attitude
  • Slurred, slowed speech

Hypothermia can happen to anyone not prepared both physically and with the proper gear, including plenty of water and food. It may be a warm day, but when you begin to sweat and the temperature decreases as you gain elevation, your body temperature can drop quickly. This combined with dehydration can make you more susceptible to hypothermia.

To avoid hypothermia:

  • Keep hydrated and snack often. Hydration and food will keep you balanced and your electrolytes in check. Don’t forget that salty snack.
  • Bring layers and stay dry. Wet clothing will cause your body temperature to drop faster as the air becomes cooler. Change out of wet clothing. Layering will help keep you warm on summits and when you’re resting or descending the mountain. A lot of heat is lost through the head, so bring a hat.
  • Always be prepared. Always pack the ten essentials. Check the weather before you go, including summit forecasts, and pack for unpredictable weather. Leave your plans with someone.

Leave No Trace™

Follow the Seven Principles of Leave No Trace to maintain minimal impact on the environment and the natural resources of the Adirondacks. Use proper trail etiquette to ensure an enjoyable experience for yourself and others and tread lightly!

Protect Rare Species

The Adirondacks are home to rare and unique plant species that can only be found on our highest peaks. Of the six-million Adirondack acres, only 40 contain this elusive alpine vegetation. Alpine vegetation comes in all shapes, sizes, and colors, from vibrant purple flowers speckling the mountain to small clumps of grass poking out between the rocks. Located on the summits of 19 separate mountains, these species can only be found in the Adirondacks, making them very special and important to protect.

The plants found in our alpine areas are amazing, but they’re also extremely fragile. Here are some helpful tips you can use to help conserve Adirondack alpine vegetation:

  • Stay on marked trails or durable surfaces to avoid trampling delicate species.
  • Take lots of pictures, but never pick any of the plants that you encounter.
  • Familiarize yourself with alpine species and know which to be cautious around.
  • Take extra care when hiking, and never camp above 3,500 feet in elevation.

Wednesday, June 15, 2022

NYS DEC: June 15 marks beginning of Black Bass Open Season

Today New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos announced that the open (harvest) season for largemouth and smallmouth bass, collectively known as black bass, begins Wednesday, June 15, and runs through November 30.

The June 15 opener is now the standard opening date for these species, replacing the third Saturday in June. For most of the state, a catch-and-release season exists from Dec. 1 through June 14. Special fishing regulations exist for some waters as outlined in the current fishing regulations guide and should be closely reviewed before heading out to fish.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 15, 2022

Memorial held for Forest Ranger Captain Christopher Kostoss

forest ranger report

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents statewide. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations, and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured, or distressed people from across New York State.

Town of Wilmington
Essex County
End of Watch:
 On June 9, hundreds of people paid their respects at a memorial for Forest Ranger Captain Christopher Kostoss. Captain Kostoss died by suicide on May 31. He served as a Ranger for 23 years and was involved in countless search and rescue missions.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, June 10, 2022

ADK Park: Recent Environmental Conservation Police News

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s (DEC) Division of Law Enforcement enforces the 71 chapters of New York State’s Environmental Conservation Law (ECL), protecting fish and wildlife and preserving environmental quality across New York. In 1880, the first eight Game Protectors proudly began serving to protect the natural resources and people of New York State.

In 2021, 282 Environmental Conservation Police Officers (ECOs) and Investigators across the state responded to 26,207 calls and worked on cases that resulted in 11,562 tickets or arrests for violations ranging from deer poaching to solid waste dumping, illegal mining, the black market pet trade, and excessive emissions violations.

Sacandaga Training – Fulton County
On May 26, ECOs participated in a multi-agency training exercise on the Great Sacandaga Lake in Fulton County. Training participants included more than 90 first responders staged at the Hudson River Black River Regulating District. New York State Police and law enforcement from Fulton, Saratoga, Montgomery, and Hamilton counties participated in the training, including dive teams, fire, EMS, emergency management, district attorneys, and the Fulton County Coroner.

» Continue Reading.



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