Posts Tagged ‘NYS DOH’

Monday, May 29, 2023

New Yorkers encouraged to report harmful algal blooms through online notification system

A cyanobacteria bloom can be seen on the southern shore of Mirror Lake.

On May 26, the New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Health (DOH) reminded New Yorkers to learn about and be aware of harmful algal blooms, or “HABs,” as the 2023 HABs notification season starts. DEC’s New York Harmful Algal Bloom System (NYHABS) is now active and allows the public and trained citizens to send reports of HABs to DEC electronically via a simple, user- and mobile phone-friendly form.

“As summer begins, we encourage New Yorkers to be on the lookout for HABs, which can impact New York’s lakes and waterways and pose a potential public health risk,” said DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos. “Working closely with DOH and local partners in communities statewide, DEC continues to make significant investments to prevent excess nutrients and other contaminants from contributing to these potentially toxic blooms and is actively working to help New Yorkers understand how to identify and report HABs, as well as keep themselves, their families, and pets out of harm’s way.”

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 4, 2020

Your help needed in obtaining water quality reports

Collecting water quality data from Fawn Lake(Calling all citizen scientists! The following is from Water Line, a weekly newsletter by Adirondack Explorer water reporter Ry Rivard.)

Late last year, I began requesting documents from the state of New York to help me understand who around the Adirondacks may be drinking potentially unsafe water.

While larger communities in the state of New York post their annual drinking water quality reports online, not all smaller communities do this.

New York is notoriously slow in responding to requests for public records. To give state officials the benefit of the doubt, it’s a big state and a lot of people want to know things about it. The other explanation is that government officials like to control information, particularly information that might scare people or make themselves look bad.

» Continue Reading.



Wait! Before you go:

Catch up on all your Adirondack
news, delivered weekly to your inbox