Posts Tagged ‘NYSSA’

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Moose River Plains Multi-use Community Connector Opened

Seventh Lake Mountain Multiple use Trail (Moose River Plains Connector)The 12.8-mile Seventh Lake Mountain Multiple Use Trail (the Moose River Plains Connector) between the communities of Inlet and Raquette Lake through the Moose River Plains Wild Forest in Hamilton County is now open for public use.

The trail will provide a four season trail connection (including snowmobiles and mountain bikes) between the communities of Raquette Lake in the Town of Long Lake to the towns of Indian Lake and Inlet. The new trail connects with the existing Moose River Plains Wild Forest trail system which connects to Newcomb in Essex County and Old Forge in Herkimer County. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Discussion: What Is Snowmobiling’s Economic Impact?

A number of debates in the Adirondacks revolve around snowmobiling, including opening long-closed backcountry roads to sleds, expanding trail networks or routing connector trials on state lands, and shared use of trails. Snowmobilers often cite their positive economic impact as a reason to expand the approximately 800 miles of groomed snowmobile trails on state land.

A new study of the 2010 – 2011 snowmobiling season commissioned by the New York State Snowmobile Association and undertaken by the SUNY Potsdam Institute for Applied Research, offers some insight. It concludes that snowmobiling statewide contributes more than $428.5 million annually in direct spending, but much of that money is spent in Adirondack feeder markets on sleds, trailers, maintenance, and equipment.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, October 6, 2011

New Online Snowmobile Trails Map Available

The New York State Snomobile Association (NYSSA) has partnered with JIMAPCO, makers of road maps and mapping software, to provide snowmobilers with an online snowmobile trail guide. The online map was derived from the trail information provided by the NYS Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. The map includes all corridor and secondary trails funded through the NYS Snowmobile Trail Fund that have been mapped by GPS so far. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 26, 2011

Snowmobilers Select New Trails Coordinator

The New York State Snowmobile Association (NYSSA) has announced the selection of James E. Rolf of Rome, NY as their new statewide Trails Coordinator. Jim Rolf will be following Dave Perkins, the first and only NYSSA Trails Coordinator.

“Jim Rolf brings a great deal of snowmobiling experience to the Trails coordinator position,” Perkins said. “He has worked with many groups for the benefit of trails, has experience dealing with trails along the canal corridor, and is knowledgeable about snowmobile issues in the Adirondack Park.” » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 9, 2011

Adk Snowmobile Trails Conference, Stewards Sought

The New York State Snowmobile Association (NYSSA) will be holding the 4th Annual Adirondack Park Snowmobile Trail Conference at the Adirondack Hotel in Long Lake on Sunday, April 10th From 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM.

This year conference will focus on the several new Unit Management Plans (UMP) that have been approved and those in the works. Once approved by the Adirondack Park Agency (APA), plans for trail improvements can begin. Additional topics will be the status of Adirondack easements, Recreation Plans, and the new Trail Stewards program. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 30, 2011

NYS Snowmobile Association: Zero Alcohol

At the height of the snowmobile season, the New York State Snowmobile Association reminds riders that many snowmobile-related incidents would be prevented if every rider made the smart choice for Zero Alcohol. NYSSA endorses the Zero Alcohol program, which urges every snowmobiler to take personal responsibility for choosing to be 100% alcohol-free prior to and during any snowmobile ride.

The Zero Alcohol Campaign is delivering this message to snowmobilers across North America. Zero Alcohol encourages every snowmobiler to set an example to all riding companions to practice Zero Alcohol as part of their own regular safe riding habit.

“We are very confident that many snowmobilers have seen the Zero Alcohol message and that most are making the smart choice to ride alcohol-free,” said NYSSA President Gary Broderick. “Unfortunately, a few riders still don’t get it and our sympathies are with their loved ones who have to live with the tragic consequences of a bad decision. At this sad time, we strongly urge the families and friends of all snowmobilers to remind their loved ones to choose Zero Alcohol. ”

Although Zero Alcohol is not a legal requirement, the NYSSA community points out that unlike driving an automobile on engineered roads, snowmobiling is an inherently risky, off road activity that occurs in a natural setting. Consequently, operating a snowmobile requires peak concentration and reactions at all times. Even a small amount of alcohol can cause tragedy. Studies show that impairment starts from the first drink and that a person with a Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) of .08% is 11 times more likely to get killed while driving a car than at the .00% BAC recommended by the Zero Alcohol Campaign. Operating a snowmobile is even more challenging than driving a car.



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