Posts Tagged ‘Paddling’

Monday, December 3, 2018

New Book On Adirondack Guideboats Published

adirondack guideboat bookThe life’s work of Stephen Sulavik, The Adirondack Guideboat: Its Origins, Its Builders and Their Boats (Bauhan Publishing, 2018) provides a heavily illustrated history of the iconic Adirondack guideboat.

Stephen Sulavik was a pulmonary surgeon fascinated by the guideboats. Upon his death, his book was shepherded to publication by his friend and former Chairman of the Board of the Adirondack Museum, Robert Worth. He enlisted the help of historian Edward “Ted” Comstock and guideboat builder and expert Christopher Woodward to revise and complete the project. » Continue Reading.


Monday, November 12, 2018

Northern Forest Canoe Trail Online Auction Underway

NFCT Stewardship Crew MembersThe Northern Forest Canoe Trail’s 14th annual Online Auction kicked off November 1st, offering paddling enthusiasts a variety of outdoor-related items and experiences to bid on.

The auction is a fundraiser for the Northern Forest Canoe Trail, a nonprofit organization that manages the 740-mile water trail between Old Forge and Fort Kent, Maine. The nonprofit provides stewardship along the trail and promotes paddling in the Northern Forest region » Continue Reading.


Friday, November 2, 2018

Featured Paddle: Kunjamuk River, Speculator

kunjamuk river paddleThe village of Speculator hand launch site on the Sacandaga River is located at the Sacandaga River Community Park in Speculator (the ball field parking area).

Paddlers can access paddle routes on both the Sacandaga River and Kunjamuk River. The Kunjamuk Hand Launch on the Pine Lakes Road provides paddlers direct access to the Kunjamuk River. » Continue Reading.


Friday, September 28, 2018

Featured Hike: Rock Lake Trail, Blue Mountain Lake

rock lake trailRock Lake Trail, part of the Blue Mountain Wild Forest, extends 0.8 miles from the trailhead on State Route 28/30 to the shore of Rock Lake, dropping only 80 feet in elevation in that distance. Rock Lake is not only scenic, but provides paddling and fishing opportunities as well. The lake contains brook trout, smallmouth bass, and panfish. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, September 27, 2018

Current Adirondack Outdoor Recreation Conditions (Sept 27)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled each Thursday afternoon and fully updated by Friday afternoon.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Add a comment below, or send your observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com.

Learn and practice the seven Leave No Trace principles. Carry out what you have carried in. Do not leave gear, food, or other items at lean-tos and campsites. Do not litter. Take the free online Leave No Trace course here.

BE PREPARED! Start slow, gain experience. Always carry proper safety equipment – including plenty of food, water, flashlights, space blanket, emergency whistle, first aid kit, fire making tools, extra clothing layers and socks, and a map and compass – inform someone of your itinerary, and be prepared to spend an unplanned night in the woods in cold temperatures. Just before entering the backcountry or launching a boat check the National Weather Service watches, warnings, and advisories here. Follow Adirondack weather forecasts at Burlington and Albany and consult the High Elevation, Recreation, or Lake Champlain forecasts.

SEPTEMBER 27, 2018 – SPECIAL NOTICES » Continue Reading.


Friday, September 21, 2018

Featured Paddle: Essex Chain Lakes

Essex Chain Lakes MapThe Essex Chain Lakes Complex contains 18 water bodies totaling 785 acres that range in size from 3-acre Chub Pond to 216-acre Third Lake. Paddlers can carry their canoe or kayak 0.25 miles to Deer Pond from the Deer Pond Parking Area at the end of the Cornell/Deer Pond Road. The 0.5-mile carry from Deer Pond to Third Lake is located directly across the pond on its southern shore.

Once in Third Lake, paddlers can access Second Lake by water and from there travel to First Lake using a 0.1-mile carry trail. On the northern shore of First Lake near its western end is the 0.4-mile carry to Grassy Pond. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, September 20, 2018

Current Adirondack Outdoor Recreation Conditions (Sept 20)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled each Thursday afternoon and fully updated by Friday afternoon.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Add a comment below, or send your observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com.

Learn and practice the seven Leave No Trace principles. Carry out what you have carried in. Do not leave gear, food, or other items at lean-tos and campsites. Do not litter. Take the free online Leave No Trace course here.

BE PREPARED! Start slow, gain experience. Always carry proper safety equipment – including plenty of food, water, flashlights, space blanket, emergency whistle, first aid kit, fire making tools, extra clothing layers and socks, and a map and compass – inform someone of your itinerary, and be prepared to spend an unplanned night in the woods in cold temperatures. Just before entering the backcountry or launching a boat check the National Weather Service watches, warnings, and advisories here. Follow Adirondack weather forecasts at Burlington and Albany and consult the High Elevation, Recreation, or Lake Champlain forecasts.

SEPTEMBER 20, 2018 – SPECIAL NOTICES » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Lorraine Duvall: Weller Pond Protests and Quiet Waters

Weller Pond canoe inAs an advocate for quiet waters, on August 18, 2018, I joined with 36 canoes and guide boats on a Canoe-In to Weller Pond and Little Weller Pond to lobby for no motors on these pristine bodies of water (cul-de-sacs of the Saranac Chain of Lakes.) As we paddled toward the channel to Weller Pond nine powerboats lined the shore of nearby Hungry Bay. We chanted “All we want is 2%: You have 98,” referencing the amount of the waters open to motors on these lakes. The entire 17.5- mile route from Lower Saranac to Upper Saranac Lake allows for the unlimited use of motorboats.

The motor-boaters held signs urging that Weller be kept open to them. After hearing about the Canoe-In, they had sponsored an advertisement in the Adirondack Daily Enterprise on August 11 encouraging “Motorboat owners and boat enthusiasts to come and show your support in preserving and protecting our rights on the water.” » Continue Reading.


Friday, August 24, 2018

Cold Water Shock: A Mysterious Lake George Tragedy

The combined stories of Alma Gatti and Jerry Walker reveal two offspring any parent would be proud to claim as their own. Their young lives were filled with activities and accomplishments, suggesting a promising future ahead.

Jerry (Cuthbert Orton Walker Jr.), an Arkansas native, spent most of his childhood in Little Rock. He attended the University of Washington in Seattle in the early 1940s, and roomed with three friends while working as a furniture-store clerk. Life was interrupted by World War II, and beginning as an army private barely a month after the attack on Pearl Harbor, he spent 30 months in Europe, the Pacific, and the Middle East. His service ended in 1946 as a first lieutenant whose awards included the Philippines Liberation Medal and the Bronze Star. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 23, 2018

Adirondack Forest Ranger Report: Two Searches, Two Rescues

DEC Forest RangerNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents in the Adirondacks. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the Adirondack backcountry.

What follows is a report, prepared by DEC, of recent missions carried out by Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 14, 2018

20 Years After Canoe-In for Wilderness at Little Tupper Lake

Motorless lakes protest courtesy Nancie BattagliaWednesday marks the 20th anniversary of the Canoe-In for Wilderness on Little Tupper Lake. On August 15, 1998, over 300 people in over 200 canoes, kayaks, guide-boats, rowboats, and one small sailboat, rallied on the sloping lawns of the Whitney Headquarters on the shore of Little Tupper Lake and then paddled out onto the lake in a massive flotilla in the Canoe-In for Wilderness at Little Tupper Lake.

This event was the biggest environmental rally in a very challenging and divisive time in Adirondack Park history. Those who gathered that day were unabashed in their support for a Wilderness classification for the newly purchased Little Tupper Lake. A number of important motorless waters were created in the years after the Canoe-In for Wilderness. In 1998, there had not been a major piece of land classified as Wilderness since the late 1980s when the Blue Ridge and West Canada Lake Wilderness Areas were expanded around Cedar River Flow. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 5, 2018

Canoe-In for Motorless Weller Pond Planned

weller ponds mapProtect the Adirondacks is hosting a Canoe-In for Motorless Waters on Weller Pond on Saturday, August 18, 2018. PROTECT is aiming to get 100 canoes and kayaks in a flotilla of protest calling for state action to make Weller Pond and Little Weller Pond motorless waters.

The protest is starting at 10 am. People who plan to attend should register online. Boat rentals are available in the area.

“Weller Pond and Little Weller Pond should be managed by the State of New York as a quiet waters area, made off-limits to motorized watercraft and only accessible by non-motorized vessels. These ponds should be managed by state agencies as a quiet and beautiful refuge and respite among the heavily motorized and extremely popular Saranac Lakes Chain,” Peter Bauer, executive director of Protect the Adirondacks, said in an announcement sent to the press.

PROTECT issued the following list of reasons why the Weller Ponds should be motorless: » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 27, 2018

Shingle Shanty Paddling Case Headed To Trial

Phil Brown canoes Shingle Shanty Brook in 2009 Eight years after landowners sued him, outgoing Adirondack Explorer Editor Phil Brown will stand trial in August in a case that could clarify paddlers’ rights in the Adirondacks and perhaps the state.

Brown was sued for trespass in 2010 after canoeing through land owned by the Brandreth Park Association and the affiliated Friends of Thayer Lake. The disputed waterway — Mud Pond, Mud Pond Outlet, and a part of Shingle Shanty Brook — connects two pieces of the state-owned William C. Whitney Wilderness. » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 20, 2018

Featured Paddles: Saranac River, Saranac Lake, Moose Pond

saranac river paddlerThe Saranac River offers a calm, winding river with views of the High Peaks, great for a half-day paddle meandering along Route 3 towards Bloomingdale. It flows along the western and northern borders of the McKenzie Mountain Wilderness.

Put-ins are located at the Saranac River Hand Launch or the Pine Street Hand Launch in Saranac Lake. A second car can be parked at the Moose Pond trail head on Route 3 near Bloomingdale. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 12, 2018

Farm, Canoe Tours Set For Camp Santanoni’s 125th Anniversary

santanoni main campGreat Camp Santanoni, a National Historic Landmark and New York State Historic Area in Newcomb, is celebrating its 125th anniversary this summer with special events.

This weekend, the Friends of Camp Santanoni will host hourly tours at the historic farm. In August, the Friends are collaborating with Cloudsplitter Outfitters in Newcomb to offer canoe tours on Newcomb Lake.

Santanoni Farm Days, on July 14-15, will focus on the history of the 200-acre gentleman farm that once operated in this remote wilderness setting. Tours will be held at 11, 12, 1, 2, and 3 both days to explore the farm’s buildings and landscapes. No registration is required. The farm area is a one-mile hike from the Gate Lodge off NY-28N. » Continue Reading.