Posts Tagged ‘photography’

Monday, September 24, 2018

Overflow Crowd Prompts Spirit Photos Program Encore

Victorian Spirit PhotographyAn overflow crowd for the Ticonderoga Historical Society’s program “Victorian Spirit Photography” has resulted in an additional program being scheduled for Friday, October 5 at 7 pm.

“Victorian Spirit Photography” proved so popular that a number of those who wished to attend were unable to get into the program room last Friday evening. The additional presentation will allow attendees to make seat reservations by phone, e-mail or via Facebook.

As before, O’Connor promises a couple of “surprises” during the program and invites both the living and “otherworldly” to attend. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, April 15, 2018

“Wild Jess” Elliott: Setting the Record Straight

camp elliottJessie Elliott was a unique figure in the history of the Beaver River country in the west central Adirondacks. Visitors to the tiny settlement of Beaver River are still told she went to prison for her role in the bootlegging that was rampant in the lumberjack days of the early 1920s. She is listed among the “lawless ladies” in Niki Kourofsky’s recent book, Adirondack Outlaws. Pat Thompson’s memoir about life in Beaver River claims Jessie rode her steed through the settlement with her long hair flowing and a pistol in a holster on her belt. More fantastic stories about Jessie can be found in Bill Donnelly’s Short History of Beaver River where she is described, among other things, as a good-looking Calamity Jane, a bootlegger, and a prostitute. The truth underlying the legends reveals a much more complex and interesting wilderness woman. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, February 1, 2018

Photo Contest: Dramatic Adirondack Skies

The Adirondack Explorer‘s next “Views of the Park” photo contest takes a look upward for dramatic sky photos.

Post your photos to Facebook and Instagram using the hashtag #adkexplorerpix.

Explorer staff will choose their favorite photos to be included on the Adirondack Explorer website and highlighted in the bimonthly magazine. If yours is chosen, you’ll receive a free one-year subscription to the Explorer.

Don’t worry, you don’t need to be a professional. Just get out your phone and snap a pic. Or send one from a previous year.

Plus a People’s Choice

We will post our favorite few photos to Facebook and let readers vote for a “People’s Choice” to be recognized in the magazine.

And thank you to all who sent in photos for the last contest: “Winter views.” We loved them all so much it was hard to choose. Check out the final five winners.


Saturday, January 20, 2018

Stoddard As Art Photographer

stoddard photography“Water and Light,” a selection of images from Seneca Ray Stoddard’s Lake George portfolio exhibited at the Chapman Historical Museum last summer, has been reimagined as a new, ground-breaking book on Stoddard’s photography.

The 160-page volume, featuring 150 images selected and reproduced by Chapman director Tim Weidner, includes interpretive and biographical essays by Joseph Cutshall-King, the historian who led the Chapman when the Museum acquired its Stoddard collection from Maitland De Sormo in 1977. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, December 23, 2017

New Stoddard Book of Lake George Photos

water and light book coverThe Chapman Historical Museum in Glens Falls has just published Water & Light: S.R. Stoddard’s Lake George, a new work on the photography of Seneca Ray Stoddard.

The 160-page book features 150 of Stoddard’s photos, as well as some samples of his painting, sketches and cartography.

As a 19th century American photographer, S. R. Stoddard is often ranked with William Henry Jackson and Carlton Watkins, and the quality of his photographic compositions is compared with many of the Hudson River School painters. It is estimated Stoddard took some ten thousand images in the Adirondack Mountains alone. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Photo Contest Looking For Winter Scenes

Just when we thought we were destined for another warm winter, we’ve gotten some snow — and ice. Perfect timing for the Adirondack Explorer’s next Views of the Park photo contest. We’re looking for your photos of winter scenes in the Adirondacks.

Post your photos to Facebook and Instagram using the hashtag #adkexplorerpix  » Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 3, 2017

Nancie Battaglia Photography in Elizabethtown

Heart Lake, autumn reflectionsThe Adirondack History Museum will continue its summer lecture series with “Photographing the Adirondacks” with Nancie Battaglia on August 10th.

From the pages of Adirondack Life and the Adirondack Explorer to worldwide editions of Sports Illustrated, to the New York Times and National Geographic, Battaglia’s visual stories capture human interest features, breaking news, peak action sports and striking scenery. An active outdoor enthusiast, she is an ADK 46er twice. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 3, 2017

Mark Bowie: ‘Night over the Northeast’ Photography at Chapman

mark bowie photoPhotographer Mark Bowie will present an illustrated talk, “Night over the Northeast,” on Tuesday, August 8 at 7 pm at the Chapman Museum in Glens Falls.

Based on his ongoing project to photograph the landscapes of New York and New England at night, Bowie will share the thought processes and techniques used to produce spectacular nocturnal images of the region’s mountains, woods, waters, villages and coastlines. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, July 22, 2017

William Henry Jackson’s Early Adirondack Color Postcards

1902 Jackson ADK carryOne of the greatest landscape photographers during the latter half of the Nineteenth Century was William Henry Jackson (April 4, 1843 – June 30, 1942). A native son of the Adirondacks Jackson was born in Keeseville, New York to George Jackson and Harriet Allen. Harriet was a talented water-colorist and William inherited her artistic flair. His first job as an artist in 1858 was a re-toucher for a photography studio in Troy New York.

In 1866 after serving in the Civil War, Jackson boarded a Union Pacific train to the end of the line in Omaha, Nebraska. There he entered the photography business. The Union Pacific gave him a commission in 1869 to document the scenery along their routes for promotional purposes. It was this work that was discovered by Ferdinand Hayden who invited Jackson on the 1870 U.S. government survey (predecessor of the U.S. Geologic Survey) of the Yellowstone River and Rocky Mountains. He was also on the 1871 Hayden Geologic Survey which led to the creation of Yellowstone as America’s first National Park. It was Jackson’s images that played an important role in convincing Congress to establish the Park in 1872. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Unique Adirondack Heilman Photography Program at Chapman July 25th

the adirondacks season by seasonOn Tuesday, July 25, at 7 pm, the Chapman Museum will host a program and book signing with photographer Carl Heilman II, who will discuss his book The Adirondacks: Season by Season.

In 2015, for an Adirondack Life project, Carl Heilman photographed a single dramatic Adirondack scene throughout the entire year. Beginning with a pre-dawn hike on a brisk mid-January morning, and ending with a unique clouds motion sequence on Dec 30, he hiked the mile and a half, and 1,500 feet of elevation up the Giant Mountain Ridge trail 35 times to photograph the changes in each of the 12 months. Carl also shot video and time lapse sequences to convey the feeling of being there at this single location over a year’s time.  » Continue Reading.


Monday, July 17, 2017

Photo Contest: Show Us Views From Moderate Mountaintops

The Adirondack Explorer‘s next “Views of the Park” photo contest is focusing on everyone’s favorite type of photo: from the summit of a mountaintop.

And in light of the ongoing problem of overcrowding in the high peaks region, we’re asking you to post photos from the mountains you’ve hiked that are “Under 4,000” feet, or outside the forty-six high peaks.

Post your photos to Facebook and Instagram using the hashtag #adkexplorerpix. » Continue Reading.


Monday, June 12, 2017

History Museum Exhibit Explores High Peaks Photography

A Sense of Place ShowThe Adirondack History Museum opened for its 2017 season with a reception celebrating its new art show, “A Sense of Place: Photography of the High Peaks Region.”

“Our way of seeing and being in the Adirondacks has changed in many ways since the early days of settling and visiting the region. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries photography was about documenting progress and presence. Photographers today are seeking silence and solitude,” Exhibit Curator Dan Keegan said in statement sent to the press.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Photo Contest: Adirondack Paddles

Don’t forget to dig out those photos of paddling from previous years or get out in your vessel and snap a new one and submit it for our Adirondack Explorer Views of the Park photo contest. Details here. » Continue Reading.


Monday, May 8, 2017

Paddle Pics Next Up For Adirondack Explorer Photo Contest

The ice is gone, the air is warm and the bugs aren’t out yet: Time to hit the water!

The Adirondack Explorer is continuing its Views of the Park photo contest with the theme “Out for a Paddle” — whichever kind of paddling you do, wherever you do it (as long as it’s in the Adirondacks). Post your photos to Facebook and Instagram using the hashtag #adkexplorerpix

Explorer staff will choose their favorite photos to be included on the Adirondack Explorer website and highlighted in the bimonthly magazine. If yours is chosen, you’ll receive a free one-year subscription to the Explorer. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, May 3, 2017

A New Stoddard Mini Exhibit at Chapman Museum

Travelers on the porch at the Halfway House, 1870. The Chapman Historical Museum has opened a new mini-exhibit of Seneca Ray Stoddard photographs. Featured are images of the stage coach trip that visitors in the 1870s experienced from the train station in Glens Falls to the Fort William Henry Hotel at the south end of Lake George. In addition to the Halfway House, highlights include the tollhouse in French Mountain, Bloody Pond, Col. Ephraim Williams’ monument, and the grounds of the hotel. » Continue Reading.