Posts Tagged ‘Pollinator Week’

Thursday, June 24, 2021

Pollinator Week Article Collection

In recognition of Pollinator Week, we’ve compiled a selection of articles about pollinating birds and insects and the important roles they play.

National Pollinator Week: Who are the pollinators?

An article from last years pollinator week by Jackie Woodcock. Jackie show cases a few insects, birds, flowers, and lizards, explaining how each organism plays a roll in the pollination process.

National Pollinator Week 2020

Another article from last year’s pollinator week by the Adirondack Almanack, meant to highlight the critical importance of pollinators to biodiversity, food supply, and the economy.

Celebrate Spring by Planting Natives for Pollinator

An article from pollinator week 2019, while the sale advertised within is no longer going on, the information on planting and growing pollinator gardens is still valuable.

Creating Backyard Habitat for Pollinators

In this 2018 article, the Adirondack Pollinator Project presented two lectures by Kim Eierman, and environmental horticulturist specializing in ecological landscapes and native plants. The lectures are no longer available but the article still contains valuable information.

Wild Pollinators and Crop Viability

In this article by Richard Gast, he explains in depth the process of pollination and its uses. The article also provides more information from the Northeast Pollinator Partnership.

10 Ways You Can Help Pollinators

In this article from 2020, Jackie Woodcock explains the trouble that pollinators find themselves in, and 10 ways that you can be of assistance to them.

More to explore:

 

 


Tuesday, June 22, 2021

Calling all junior gardeners

This summer, AdkAction’s Mobile Pollinator Garden Trailer, or “Pollinator-Mobile,” will travel around the Adirondacks, helping plant eleven community pollinator gardens as part of their hands-on pollinator conservation efforts – and Mountain Lake PBS is bee-yond excited to get in on the action!

Join us on Friday, June 25th anytime from 2 to 4 PM! Kids can lend a hand and plant pollinator-friendly wildflowers in the garden, and then take home a seed packet to start their very own! Everyone leaves with a PBS KIDS activity bag and book to keep the fun and learning going at home.

Click here for information and to register


Monday, June 21, 2021

Flight of the Pollinators

For over a month now, pollinators here in the mountains have been working their life keeping magic.  Each of these winged creatures participating in the cycle of life of the flora that covers the forest floors and meadows.  The first pollinators to appear as Spring rolls in, are the mason and carpenter bees who are able to withstand the cooler temperatures followed by bumble bees and then the smaller breeds of solitary, ground dwelling bees which includes polyester bees among many.

In Lepidoptera land, moths that have overwintered in the Adirondacks emerge from their cocoons as well as butterflies that are able to withstand the slowly warming temperatures have made their winged displays known.  The eastern tiger swallowtail (pictured here) is one of the first butterflies to soar the fields and roadsides.  They are not alone, the checkered and mustard whites, orange and clouded sulfurs and some skippers join them.  Some of the migrating butterflies have began to arrive back to the mountains beginning the first week of May, so you may have observed white and red admirals, northern crescents and common blues and whites with monarchs to arrive here by the end of this month.

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Sunday, June 20, 2021

Celebrate Pollinator Week with Activities in the Adirondacks

pollinator gardenAdkAction’s Adirondack Pollinator Project is pleased to announce the annual celebration of Pollinator Week, June 21-27, recognizing the invaluable role pollinators play in supporting biodiversity, food availability, and the economy.

An estimated one third of all foods and beverages is dependent on pollinators. In New York State alone, $350 million per year is accrued in services provided by bees and other pollinators. The work of pollinators ensures full harvests of crops and contributes to healthy plants everywhere. Vital pollinator populations are declining due to pesticide use, disease and parasite problems, and loss of food and nesting habitat.

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