Posts Tagged ‘Rondaxe Fire Tower’

Saturday, March 9, 2024

Surveying the Adirondacks: An intriguing undertaking

Bald Eagle in a tree

After a couple short spurts of snow at the beginning of the week, it has been all downhill for the snow cover since then. With temperatures predicted above normal for the next few days, there will be very little snow left in the woods and [unstable] ice conditions on any lake. [Back] when I was trapping beavers with my partners in the Moose River Area, they would still be trapping into April with a snowmobile…but not anymore. This is surely giving the deer a break, and if it stays like this, the bears will be out checking bird feeders on their travels.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, September 9, 2023

Weathering a storm during Woodhull Mountain tower lighting

sunset from Woodhull Mountain fire tower

The folks in the Southeastern states of Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina are putting together their infrastructure and many homes that were flooded out (or damaged) with the wind and rain from Hurricane Idalia. It came through at the worst time. There was a full moon, causing the highest time for tides and storm surges of up to twelve feet. That hit areas in Florida where they were less than that above sea level.

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Friday, May 3, 2019

Featured Hike: Rondaxe Fire Tower, Bald Mountain

rondaxe fire tower trailBald Mountain (2,350 Feet) is located in the 16,028-acre Fulton Chain Wild Forest, which includes about 20 miles of marked foot trails.

This very popular short hike leads to a long ridge with views and the Rondaxe Fire Tower, which has been restored and can be climbed. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 16, 2018

High Usage At Bald Mountain’s Rondaxe Fire Tower Trail

rondaxe fire towerThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is reminding people to practice Leave No Trace Principles when visiting Bald Mountain’s Rondaxe Fire Tower in near Old Forge.

Leave No Trace Principles include: planning and being prepared for hiking; disposing of waste properly (pack it in, pack it out); leaving rocks, plants and other natural objects as you find them; and respecting wildlife, flora and fauna. » Continue Reading.



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