Posts Tagged ‘salamanders’

Thursday, April 22, 2021

Learn about Adirondack amphibians with naturalist Ed Kanze

close up of spotted salamanderJoin naturalist, author, and Adirondack guide Ed Kanze for a look at the amphibians that inhabit Adirondack Mountain woods and wetlands. This program will offer insights into the lives of amphibians and how to identify and gently interact with the ones you find. Ed will show photos of most of the frogs, toads, and salamanders that occur in the Adirondacks, and share his adventures in finding them. Ever met a mink frog or a spring salamander? Here is your chance to learn more about them.
This live, online program is free for Wild Center member households, and is available to others for $15 per household.
Thursday, April 29 @ 6:00 PM Eastern, via Zoom
Click here to register
(only 1 person need register per household)
After registering for this event, you will receive a confirmation with the Zoom link for joining.
With his wife and two teenagers, Ed Kanze lives on eighteen amphibian-rich acres along the Saranac River near Bloomingdale. A frog and salamander enthusiast since he was old enough to toddle, Ed has enjoyed and photographed amphibians widely in North America, Costa Rica, Australia, and New Zealand. He is the author of six books, including Adirondack: Life and Wildlife in the Wild, Wild East, writes the “Wild Side” column for each issue of Adirondack Explorer, and contributes frequently to Adirondack Life. He is a contributing editor at Bird Watcher’s Digest magazine.
Photo of spotted salamander by K.P. McFarland, vtecostudies.org/Almanack archive

Thursday, February 4, 2021

Amphibian Migrations & Road Crossings Training for Volunteers Feb. 10

salamanderOn rainy spring nights when weather conditions are right, large numbers of salamanders and frogs emerge from winter hibernation in the forest and make their way to woodland pools, where they’ll mate and lay eggs. Many migrating amphibians need to cross roads to reach these vernal pools. The Amphibian Migrations and Road Crossings Project enlists volunteers to find locations in the Hudson Valley where migrations cross roads; document weather and traffic conditions; record migrating amphibians; and help them across the road.

Are you interested in volunteering? The Amphibian Migrations & Road Crossings (AM&RC) Project is offering an online training program on Wednesday, February 10, 4:30 p.m. – 6 p.m. This session will serve as an introduction to new participants and a refresher for returning volunteers. If you’ve never attended an AM&RC training, we strongly encourage you to watch the recorded training modules on YouTube for more in-depth instruction and information, prior to the online program.

The training on February 10 will include:

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Tuesday, June 2, 2020

In search of spring salamanders

By Thompson Tomaszewski, Lead Naturalist, Paul Smith’s College VIC

Every resident of the Park marks the changing of the seasons in their own way. We all joke about the “12 seasons of the Adirondacks” that include second winter, false spring, mud season (followed by third winter) and so on as if we are bothered by the seasonality of our landscape, but that is far from the truth. Us blue-liners have come to terms with our seasonal lives, and find excitement in the signs of seasonal changes.

The call of spring peepers (Pseudacris crucifer) (pictured at left) is by far my favorite sound; no noise of any other critter compares. I could sit and listen for hours on end to their high pitched peeps. This, to me, is the song of spring in the Adirondacks.

Laced into this soprano song is the clucking call of the wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus). Their rough tune is starkly contrasted with that of their neighbor’s but is equally a part of this choir that I’ve come to know and yearn for each April.

This choir is my favorite for two reasons: 1) it’s pleasing to the ear, and 2) it means that salamanders are getting ready to move.

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