Posts Tagged ‘salmon’

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Canal Schooner Celebrating Champlain Salmon

Lois McClure courtesy Lake Champlain MaritimeThe canal schooner Lois McClure, an 88′ full-scale replica based on shipwrecks of the mid-19th century discovered in Lake Champlain, takes to the water, starting this weekend.

In 2019, the Lois will celebrate the International Year of the Salmon, sharing the history, ecology, and conservation story of Atlantic salmon in the Champlain watershed. » Continue Reading.


Monday, June 17, 2019

History of Champlain Salmon Focus of Ti Exhibit

salmon courtesy Concordia UniversityThe Ticonderoga Historical Society has opened the exhibit “Salmon and People,” set to run through June 21, with a free public program on Friday, June 21 at the Hancock House, 6 Moses Circle, Ticonderoga. Provided by the Champlain Valley National Heritage Partnership, the exhibit celebrates 2019 as the “International Year of the Salmon.” » Continue Reading.


Saturday, June 30, 2018

Angling Tips: Help Trout and Salmon Beat the Heat

brown troutThis spring, trout and trout anglers have benefited from abundant rainfall and cool weather conditions that promote the growth and survival of trout and salmon. However, with the forecast for high temperatures this weekend through next week, it is important to remember that trout and salmon are coldwater sportfish that can experience serious physical stress whenever water temperatures climb above 70° Fahrenheit. Heat stressed fish often seek pockets of cold water created by upwelling groundwater, small feeder streams, or water released from deep reservoirs. These refuges allow trout to avoid or recover from potentially fatal levels of heat stress. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, September 16, 2017

Cornell’s History of Protecting Adirondack Fisheries

2016 Cornell Adirondack Fisheries Research Program Boat CrewI recently wrote about the impacts of acid rain, which results from burning fossil fuels, on Adirondack lakes and streams. But, did you know that Cornell University has been a leader in efforts to safeguard natural fisheries within the Adirondacks and to protect them from the damaging effects of acid rain, invasive species, and climate change for well-over half-a-century?

In fact, Cornell’s cold-water fishery research has historically focused on the Adirondack region. And just last year, the New York State College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell University (CALS) established a new faculty fellowship in fisheries and aquatic sciences, named for the late (and extremely-well-respected) Professor of Fishery Biology, Dr. Dwight A. Webster; the educator who laid the groundwork for what is now the Adirondack Fishery Research Program (AFRP). » Continue Reading.